Courses Taught by Andrew Ault

EHS574: Environmental Chemistry

  • Graduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Ault, Andrew
  • Prerequisites: General Chemistry (2 terms), additional courses in Organic Chemistry, Analytical, or Physical Chemistry are advised; Undergraduates may enroll with instructor consent.
  • Description: Environmental chemistry is the study of natural processes in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere, as well as how mankind alters these systems. Natural cycles in the environment, perturbations due to human activity, steps being taken to mitigate these effects, and the impacts on human health and climate will be covered.
  • This course is cross-listed with CHEM474, CHEM574.

EHS640: Environmental Chemistry Laboratory

  • Graduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Ault, Andrew
  • Not offered 2018-2019
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: Measuring concentrations of and changes to environmental pollutants in air, water, soil, and consumer products is central to understanding the impact of the environment on human health. This laboratory course will explore sampling methods and measurement techniques, which are important when considering different exposure to pollutants in the environment.
  • Course Goals: Students will gain hands-on experience with study design, laboratory measurements, monitoring equipment and sophisticated instrumentation. Students will sample both in the laboratory and the ambient environment as part of this experiential course to gain practical experience at environmental measurements.
  • Competencies: - Execute study design and planning for sampling in the ambient environment. - Conduct air and water sampling with a range of environmental monitoring equipment. - Carry out spatiotemporal analysis of pollutants over different spatial scales. - Be able to follow laboratory safety procedures and best safety practices relevant to an environmental workplace. - Be able to prepare of technical material regarding air, water, and consumer product sampling, through figure, tables, and written reports. - Be able to present and defend experimental data from environmental sampling to peers and instructor.
  • Learning Objectives: - Train students in hands-on operation of a range of methods and instrumentation used in air quality, water quality, and consumer products testing. - Teach students to develop sampling plans and approaches to study design. - Provide students practical experience with conducting research in a laboratory setting. - Explore the challenges and decisions that must be made when conducting ambient sampling, particularly in a restricted time window. - Gain experience transforming data from instrument outputs to presentable technical material.

EHS688: Professional Development in Environmental Health Sciences I

  • Graduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 0.5 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Ault, Andrew
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course is designed to introduce students to the Department of Environmental Health Sciences, resources available in School of Public Health and the broader University of Michigan environment, to prepare students for their internship experience, and to introduce students to different types of careers in environmental health.

EHS689: Professional Development in Environmental Health Sciences II

  • Graduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 0.5 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Ault, Andrew
  • Prerequisites: Second year EHS MPH student
  • Description: This course is designed to connect training in EHS with the practical and complex challenges associated with working in professional organizations. As the second professional development course of the EHS Master of Public Health program, EHS 689 concludes and integrates the summer field experience with academic concepts.
  • Course Goals: The overall objective is to prepare students for a career in EHS, and to foster professional development. To achieve this goal, students taking this class are expected to learn about the following: -To enhance student skills in synthesizing, translating, and communicating environmental health-related information, data, and experiences -To provide students with the opportunity to learn from and interact with EHS professionals across the subdisciplines in EHS -To familiarize students with career resources that are available in EHS, the School of Public Health, and the University of Michigan -To prepare students to successfully obtain an EHS position upon graduation
  • Competencies: The overall expectation is that students will be able to use the knowledge and skills gained in this course to prepare for an EHS career in a multidisciplinary setting, and to integrate knowledge, skills, and abilities gained through academic coursework with practical, hands-on experience gained through the field experience. Specifically, students who complete this class are expected to be able to do the following: -Demonstrate effective written and oral skills for communicating with different audiences in the context of professional public health activities -Apply evidence-based principles and the scientific knowledge base to critical evaluation and decision-making in public health

EHS874: Aerosol Chemistry Physics and Impacts

  • Graduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Ault, Andrew
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: Aerosols have global implications for human health and climate, but are challenging to understand due to their complex physical and chemical properties that determine their behavior in the atmosphere. This course will explore be divided into three major sections: aerosol physics, aerosol chemistry, and aerosol impacts.
  • Course Goals: - Learn about how to describe particles and particle populations through different physical properties: particle diameters, concentrations, morphology, and size distributions - Describe particle motion under different flow regimes, such as turbulent or laminar, through the use of Reynolds numbers, Stokes' Law, electrical fields, and Brownian motion. - Explore processes that modify particle physical properties, including: condensation, evaporation, and coagulation. - Describe the chemical composition of aerosols and the sources, heterogeneous reactions, and other processes that modify aerosol composition. - Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of different characterization methods for aerosols, including: gravimetric analysis, electron microscopy, light scattering, mass spectrometry, and spectroscopy. - Explore the impacts of atmospheric particles on health through inhalation and climate through light scattering or cloud formation.
  • Competencies: - Develop the ability to interconvert between different types of particle diameter and utilize particle size distributions to describe particle populations. - Be able to mathematically solve for aerosol motion and losses in different types of flow. - Understand how to solve for particle modification in different chemical environments. - Gain the ability to make informed decisions about which characterization technique is appropriate for different applications. - Be able to explain the impacts of aerosols on health and climate and the benefits and challenges of different actions, such as regulation, to mitigate aerosol effects.