Courses Taught by Justin Colacino

EHS602 Essentials of Toxicology

  • Graduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Colacino, Justin
  • Description: This course examines basic concepts of occupational and environmental toxicology, including uptake, distribution, metabolic conversion, and elimination of toxic agents, as well as the fundamental models used to describe the interaction of xenobiotic agents with biological systems. The course focuses on the application of these concepts to the assessment of exposures, estimates for risk of disease, establishment of appropriate limits on exposures and ambient levels of toxic materials/agents, and understanding and prevention of mortality and morbidity resulting from environmental exposure to toxic substances through a case study format.
  • Syllabus for EHS602

NUTR657 Nutrition, the Environment, and Cancer

  • Graduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Zick, Suzanna; Colacino, Justin;
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 502 or 522 or equivalent; EPID 503 or equivalent; and PHYSIO 502 or equivalent
  • Description: A large amount of research indicates that dietary and environmental factors impact the development and recurrence of various types of cancer. This course will survey both classic and emerging literature relevant to this topic in a structured discussion and journal club format.
  • Course Goals: The course will provide students with an opportunity to critically examine and discuss methodological issues around study design and analysis, to understand key concepts of, and to explore the biological mechanisms underlying the associations between diet, the environment, and cancer.,The course will provide students with an opportunity to critically examine and discuss methodological issues around study design and analysis, to understand key concepts of, and to explore the biological mechanisms underlying the associations between diet, the environment, and cancer.
  • Competencies: 1.) Identify sources of bias in nutrition and cancer research and anticipate their potential effects on estimates of association 2.) Weight evidence of the relationship between diet and cancer according to the relative methodological strength of scientific reports 3.) Understand the effects of timing, frequency, duration, and magnitude of exposure to nutrients and environmental exposures on the development of cancer. 4.) Link indicators used in epidemiological and clinical studies with the underlying biological processes they intend to measure. 5.) Integrate evidence from different sources into conceptual frames on nutrition, the environment, and cancer topics. 6.) Understand different strategies for analysis of epidemiological and clinical data in nutrition, the environment, and cancer research. 7.) Envision potential "next steps" to follow (what should be the next study) to build a complete conceptual frame on given cancer and nutrition or cancer and the environment topics.,1.) Identify sources of bias in nutrition and cancer research and anticipate their potential effects on estimates of association 2.) Weight evidence of the relationship between diet and cancer according to the relative methodological strength of scientific reports 3.) Understand the effects of timing, frequency, duration, and magnitude of exposure to nutrients and environmental exposures on the development of cancer. 4.) Link indicators used in epidemiological and clinical studies with the underlying biological processes they intend to measure. 5.) Integrate evidence from different sources into conceptual frames on nutrition, the environment, and cancer topics. 6.) Understand different strategies for analysis of epidemiological and clinical data in nutrition, the environment, and cancer research. 7.) Envision potential "next steps" to follow (what should be the next study) to build a complete conceptual frame on given cancer and nutrition or cancer and the environment topics.

PUBHLTH610 Introduction to Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Colacino, Justin
  • Description: This course is intended to serve as an introduction to the major issues of public health in the United States, although issues of global health will be considered as well. We will examine environmental, social and ethnic determinants of public health, and how they may be altered.
  • Course Goals: 1)Introduce the major issues of public health with a primary focus on public health 2)Discuss environmental, social and ethnic determinants of public health and prevention for chronic and infectious diseases. 3)Examine some of the key public health issues facing the U.S. and world, what determines them, and how they may be altered.
  • Competencies: 1. Students will be able to explain what public health is, what distinguishes it from other health sciences, and what unique contributions it has to make to the health of the public. 2. Students will be able to identify the principle determinants of health and disease, including the determinants of, and explanations for, inequalities in the health of groups differentiated by race, ethnicity, and economic status. 3. Students will understand when and why governments should intervene in matters pertaining to health of the public and when they should not. 4. Students will be able to identify the principle social and behavioral determinants of health and demonstrate how they influence the most important current behavior-related health problems. 5. Students will be able to identify the principle environmental determinants of health and describe the major environmental health issues of the present time. 6. Students will be able to identify critical issues in global health.