Courses Taught by Andrew Jones

NUTR555 Foundations of Sustainable Food Systems

  • Graduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Jones, Andrew
  • Prerequisites: None.
  • Description: This course teaches about food systems through interdisciplinary, experiential learning and dialogue-based inquiry. In addition to learning how to bridge worldviews and apply systems thinking, students will study the unique perspectives of public health nutritionists involved in addressing complex food systems problems.
  • Course Goals: During this course, students will: 1) study the characteristics, outcomes, objectives and values of different contemporary food systems in the Global North and South; 2) analyze and critique peer-reviewed literature examining the processes and outcomes of food systems models through an interdisciplinary lens; 3) practice communicating ideas about food systems in oral presentations to peers in a group setting; 4) participate as a member of a multidisciplinary team; 5) engage with food systems stakeholders in classroom and field settings; and 6) explore their own and others' diverse values and viewpoints about food systems based on supporting evidence.
  • Competencies: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) describe key concepts across disciplines and perspectives related to sustainable food systems; 2) evaluate assumptions and values about food systems that underpin one's own thinking and that of others; 3) apply and synthesize scientific evidence in support of arguments that address food systems research questions; 4) analyze and critically evaluate food systems research results for evidence-based assessments and ethical decision-making; 5) communicate clearly and effectively about food systems through writing and oral presentations in a professional setting of diverse peers; and 6) engage in respectful dialogue, collaborative teamwork, and problem-solving with those of differing viewpoints and backgrounds.

NUTR633 Evaluation of Global Nutrition Programs

  • Graduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Jones, Andrew
  • Description: This course will provide students with an understanding of the principles of program evaluation with an emphasis on global nutrition programs. The course will create a space for discussion and practice in which knowledge can be applied to current global nutrition issues through research and critical analysis.
  • Course Goals: By the end of this course students are expected to be able to: 1) identify key principles related to the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of global nutrition interventions; 2) apply and synthesize these principles to develop a global nutrition intervention as well as a comprehensive, field-ready monitoring and evaluation plan; 3) formulate evaluation research questions based on a review of scientific literature; 4) develop an analysis plan for and analyze data from a publicly available global nutrition data set; 5) analyze evaluation research results published in a peer-reviewed document through the critical application of evidence-based evaluation principles; 6) communicate project narratives and research findings clearly, concisely and confidently in oral presentations to a group of peers in a professional setting; 7) lead and collaborate effectively as a member of a multidisciplinary team; 8) communicate in a professional manner with a "client" organization and identify how evaluation data would serve their needs; 9) conduct key informant interviews with stakeholders from a "client" organization; 10) engage in respectful classroom and online discussions with peers using scientific evidence to communicate and support diverse viewpoints.
  • Competencies: Upon completion of this course, students will have acquired experience in the following competencies: 1) understand key concepts and programs across the landscape of current global nutrition issues and interventions (aligned with Certificate in Global Health: Competency #1); 2) develop an appropriate global nutrition intervention and a plan for the monitoring and evaluation of the intervention (aligned with Certificate in Global Health: Competency #5); 3) apply epidemiological principles to the analysis of a quantitative data set in the public domain (aligned with Certificate in Global Health: Competency #3); 4) analyze and critically evaluate research results for making evidence-based policy recommendations; 5) communicate clearly and effectively in a professional setting of peers; 6) engage in respectful dialogue and collaborative teamwork with those of differing viewpoints and backgrounds.

NUTR644 Global Food Systems Policy

  • Graduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Jones, Andrew
  • Prerequisites: None.
  • Description: This course will explore the process of developing policies in low- and middle-income countries that are targeted at altering the nature and functioning of food systems. We will assess policy contexts, stakeholders' priorities, the translation of policies into programs, and the impacts of policies on nutrition and health outcomes.
  • Course Goals: During this course, students will: 1) read and critically analyze food systems policy analysis and policy case studies; 2) practice communicating critical analysis of research and policies through formal presentations; 3) facilitate in-class discussion amongst peers; 4) practice designing and developing policy case studies that involve critical analysis of the policy process; 5) practice receiving constructive feedback from peers and incorporating it into theoretical thinking and writing; and 6) provide respectful and thoughtful feedback to their peers.
  • Competencies: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) understand definitions, concepts, and principles related to the policy process, the formation of food systems policies globally, and their impacts on nutritional outcomes relevant to public health; 2) analyze and critically evaluate food systems policies; 3) apply and synthesize evidence to design and develop policy recommendations for food systems change that have direct relevance to public health nutrition; 4) communicate clearly and effectively through oral presentations and discussions with diverse peers; and 5) engage in respectful dialogue with those of differing viewpoints and backgrounds.
  • Syllabus for NUTR644

NUTR796 Special Topics in Nutritional Sciences