Courses Taught by Staff

BIOSTAT449: Topics In Biostatistics

  • Graduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Statistics 401 or permission of instructor
  • Description: This course will make use of case studies to discuss problems and applications of biostatistics. Topics will include cohort and case control studies, survival analysis with applications in clinical trials, evaluation of diagnostic tests, and statistical genetics. The course will conclude with a survey of areas of current biostatistical research.
  • This course is cross-listed with Statistics 449 in the Literature, Science and the Arts department.

BIOSTAT511: Computer Packages

  • Graduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Enrollment in OJOC/CRDSA program
  • Description: An introduction to statistical computer packages in both network and microcomputer environments. Data organization and file management are also discussed.
  • Learning Objectives: Master basic statistical procedures on data sets using SAS and R, and to interpret the output results.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT511
Concentration Competencies that BIOSTAT511 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
BIOSTAT Clinical Research Design and Statistical Analysis MS Use statistical software to apply statistical methods and techniques BIOSTAT511

BIOSTAT605: Intro to SAS Statistical Programming

  • Graduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff Welch, Kathy
  • Prerequisites: One course in introductory statistics; Co-requisite Biostat 601 or equivalent or Perm. Instr
  • Description: This course provides incoming master's students in biostatistics with basic experience in SAS programming for data set creation and manipulation, an introduction to SAS macros, and SAS matrix manipulation.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT605

BIOSTAT810: Approaches to the Responsible Practice of Biostatistics

  • Graduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course will cover a series of topics that encompass Responsible Conduct of Research and Scholarship (RCRS) as defined by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), as well as focus upon the written and oral communication skills necessary for effective collaboration with public health investigators.
  • Course Goals: (1)To cover the following topics of Responsible Conduct of Research and Scholarship (RCRS): a)Research and Academic Misconduct - Fraud and Financial g) Research and Scholarship in Society and in the Global Workplace (2)To help students develop oral and written communication skills necessary for interaction with non-quantitative audiences. (3)To help students develop oral and written communication skills necessary for interaction with quantitative audiences.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT810

BIOSTAT820: Readings in Biostatistics

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Students assigned special topics for literature study under guidance of individual faculty members. May be elected more than once. Enrollment limited to biostatistics majors.

BIOSTAT990: Dissertation/Pre-Candidacy

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: (1-8 Full term, 1-4 Half term)
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted to status as a candidate.

BIOSTAT995: Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Admission to Doctoral Program(1-8 Full term, 1-4 Half term)
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student who has been admitted to status as a candidate.

EHS550: Introduction to Occupational and Environmental Health

  • Graduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Not offered 2019-2020
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status or Senior Standing
  • Description: Discussion of the basic concepts of occupational and environmental hygiene; recognition and evaluation of chemical,physical and biological hazards; the human environment; control hierarchies, strategies and technologies; personal protection; criteria and standards; the international dimension; and ethical issues. The course provides basic underpinnings of the nature of theory and practice in occupational and environmental hygiene, and thus provides a structural framework for thinking about the field, identifying linkages between disciplines and specialties, and providing a platform for more advanced study in the individual areas listed. The course is offered as a three-credit course in both the regular term and in the OJ/OC format.

EHS556: Occupational Ergonomics

  • Graduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Offered every other year
  • Last offered Fall 2018
  • Not offered 2019-2020
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Principles, concepts and procedures concerned with worker performance, health and safety. Topics include: biomechanics, job safety, anthropometry, work physiology, psychophysics, work stations, tools, work procedures, work standards, Musculoskeletal disorders, noise, vibration, heat stress and the analysis and design of work.
Concentration Competencies that EHS556 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Industrial Hygiene MPH Explain the physiological, toxicological, and/or biomechanical interactions of physical, chemical, biological, mechanical, and ergonomic agents, factors, and/or stressors found in the workplace with the human body EHS602, EHS556
EHS Industrial Hygiene MS Explain the physiological, toxicological, and/or biomechanical interactions of physical, chemical, biological, mechanical, and ergonomic agents, factors, and/or stressors found in the workplace with the human body EHS603, EHS556, EHS602

EHS578: Practical Projects

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Practical Projects in the application of theory and principles of Environmental Health Sciences in public health settings. Course requirements include an approved practical work experience related to Environmental Health Sciences in consultation with a faculty advisor. May be elected more than once. Enrollment limited to Environmental Health Sciences majors with at least two full terms of prior registration.

EHS588: Environmental Law (SNRE 475)

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Introduces students to Environmental Law and the impact of the legal process on decisions that affect the environment. Topics include common law tort actions, toxic tort actions, statutory controls of pollution and other environmentally harmful activities. Additional areas include administrative agency structure and performance, Constitutional rights to environmental quality and more.

EHS651: Occupational Health, Safety and Environmental Program Management

  • Graduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Offered every other year
  • Last offered Winter 2019
  • Not offered 2019-2020
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course introduces future leaders of plant and corporate level occupational health, safety and environmental programs to the breadth of functions and activities routinely performed by OHSE managers. Among the topics discussed are: OHSE organization structure and staffing, management systems, program content and metrics, budgeting, risk management, incident investigation and management, emergency preparedness and response, regulatory compliance, legal systems, health and safety culture, and prevention through design processes.
  • Course Goals: Students who have taken this course are expected to achieve a set of learning objectives by acquiring knowledge about key concepts, principles, ideas and facts. In addition, they are expected to acquire a set of competencies reflecting skills relevant to the practice of occupational and environmental health. The following tables summarize these expectations.
  • Learning Objectives: Students will gain a fundamental understanding of: (1) How OHSE programs are typically organized, the roles and responsibilities of OHSE managers, and expectations of other OHSE stakeholders in the organization. (2) Challenges associated with managing personnel and processes, including dealing with ethical issues, setting goals and measuring performance, hiring and training professionals, and managing consultants. (3) Financial aspects of program management, such as risk management and insurance, budgeting, workers compensation, and legal liability for both corporate activities and products. (4) Incident investigation and management, as well as emergency planning and response management. (5) Regulatory rulemaking, inspections, and compliance management processes.
Concentration Competencies that EHS651 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Industrial Hygiene MPH Describe the relevance of business and managerial practices to workplace health and safety EHS651

EHS670: Applications in Environmental Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: EPID 601, EPID 655, EHS 656
  • Description: Students will complete an independent reseach project under faculty supervision. Students will apply epidemiological and statistical methods to the analysis of data from epidemiological, exposure assessment or laboratory studies. This course focuses on the conduct of independent research and sceintfic writing under faculty guidance. Course must be elected for 3 credits. This course is the final course of three, in which students plan their field experience (EHS 659), complete their field experience and present a poster to the department (EHS 600), then conduct data analyses and prepare a research report (EHS 670). It is part of the Capstone experience for Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Students.

EHS697: Readings

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr
  • Description: Supervised study/review of a selected topic in environmental health, occupational health, nutrition and/or toxicology. May be elected more than once for a maximum of six credits.

EHS698: Research

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Original research investigation of a special topic in environmental health, occupational health, nutrition and/or toxicology. May be elected more than once for a maximum of six credits.

EHS699: Master's Thesis

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm of Thesis Advisor
  • Description: This course shall be elected by students enrolled in Master's degree programs that require a formal written thesis as a condition of program completion. The thesis shall be defended in front of the student's thesis committee. The course grade will reflect the student's accomplishments relative to the thesis and its defense. The course is to be elected only once.

EHS796: Special Topics in Environmental Health Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Lecture, seminars and readings selected on a current or emerging topic or theme in the environmental health sciences. The specific material and format will vary by semester and instructor.
Concentration Competencies that EHS796 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Environmental Health Promotion and Policy MPH Analyze policies addressing environmental health issues EHS796

EHS899: Advanced Research

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Original investigations of a specific topic in environmental health, occupational health, nutrition and/or toxicology. Designed for doctoral students performing research prior to passing their qualifying exam. May be elected more than once.

EHS990: Dissertation/Pre-Candidacy

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to status as candidate.

EHS995: Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students who have been admitted to status as candidate.

EPID299: Independent Research for Undergraduates

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Students do an independent microbiology research project under the supervision of afaculty member in the Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology program.
  • Course Goals: To teach students how to carry out scientific research in microbiology.
  • Learning Objectives: Students learn both specific laboratory techniques and in general how to carryout independent research.

EPID399: Independent Research for Undergraduates

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr. and at least Junior status
  • Description: Students do an independent microbiology research project under the supervision of a faculty member in the Hospital & Molecular Epidemiology program.

EPID565: Research in Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Offered every year
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Investigation of a selected problem planned and carried out by each student. Pertinent literature, investigational approaches, and progress in the investigations are discussed in seminars. May be taken more than once for up to six credits. Usually taken first for one credit. This is the Capstone Course for Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology Students.

EPID604: Applications of Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
  • Description: Application of epidemiological methods and concepts to analysis of data from epidemiological, clinical or laboratory studies. Introduction to independent research and scientific writing under faculty guidance.
  • Syllabus for EPID604

EPID624: Readings in Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Review of literature on selected subjects under guidance of individual faculty members and through scheduled seminars at which reports are presented. May be elected more than once.

EPID702: Bayesian Perspectives in Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Summer term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff Little, Roderick
  • Last offered Summer 2016
  • Prerequisites: courses in basic statistics and standard regression
  • Description: This course provides an introduction to Bayesian methods in epidemiology. Topics include: contrasting the Bayesian and classical approaches to hypothesis testing and interval estimation; strengths and weaknesses of the two paradigms, and when they give similar and dissimilar answers; objective and subjective Bayes; calibrated Bayes, a conceptual approach that combines Bayesian and frequentist ideas; computational tools, including Markov Chain Monte Carlo. the Bayesian approach to some important problems in epidemiology: contingency tables, diagnostic testing, comparison of means, regression, hierarchical models, measurement error, and analysis of data from common study designs.
  • Course Goals: The Bayesian approach to some important problems in epidemiology: contingency tables, diagnostic testing, comparison of means, regression, hierarchical models, measurement error, and analysis of data from common study designs.

EPID708: Machine Learning for Epidemiologic Analysis in the Era of Big Data

  • Graduate level
  • Summer term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Summer 2016
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: Introductory course in statistics as well as courses or working knowledge of basic regressions (linear, logistic, etc.). Having some background in the programming language R preferred.
  • Description: Course focuses on advances in machine learning and its application to causal inference and prediction via Targeted Learning, which allows the use of machine learning algorithms for prediction and estimating so-called causal parameters, such as average treatment effects, optimal treatment regimes, etc. We will discuss implementation via cloud computing.
  • Course Goals: -A basic understanding of causal inference, including structural causal models, definition of causal parameters via counterfactual distributions, and ways to establish identifiability from observed data. -Familiarity and ability to implement machine learning, specifically the concepts of SuperLearning and the power of cross-validation in data-adaptive estimation. -Ability to apply machine learning algorithms to prediction problems and estimate and derive inference for the resulting fit. -Ability to use the fits of machine learning algorithms to estimate causal effects using simple substitution estimators. -Ability to apply Targeted Learning approaches (e.g., targeted maximum likelihood estimation) to estimate, using machine learning, a priori specified treatment effects as well as general variable importance measures. -A basic understanding of how to use parallel computing and large computer clusters to be able to estimate using computer intensive algorithms on large (Big Data) data sets. -How the general methodology applies to goals of Precision Medicine.

EPID712: Epidemiology of Oral Diseases and their Role in General Health

  • Graduate level
  • Summer term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: Participants in this course will learn about the measurement and epidemiology of oral diseases and their extensive impact on quality of life. The course will illustrate the use of epidemiologic approaches to describe oral manifestations of systemic diseases and systemic manifestations of oral diseases as well as the financial and human costs of dental care. The need for patient-centered, interprofessional collaboration approaches will be discussed. The course will emphasize the evaluation of population and clinical scientific evidence in oral health epidemiology.

EPID719: Quantitative Methods in Genetic Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Summer term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward Staff
  • Prerequisites: EPID 701 or EPID 503 or EPID 600 or EPID 601 AND EPID 709 or BIOSTAT 501 or BIOSTAT 521
  • Description: This course familiarizes students with methods and principles of genetic and epigenetic epidemiology. The course integrates concepts in human genetics, population genetics, epidemiology and biostatistics. The course will emphasize applications of existing methods. Topics to be included are population genetics, gene-environment interaction, genetic and epigenetic association studies, and social epigenomics.

EPID720: Applied Mediation Analysis

  • Graduate level
  • Summer term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: The course will approach concepts and methods for mediation from the perspective of the counterfactual framework. Mediation analysis quantifies the extent to which the effect of an exposure on some outcome is mediated through a particular intermediate and the extent to which it is direct or through other pathways. Definitions, identification results and statistical techniques related to mediation analysis will be covered. The course will clarify the assumptions required for the estimation of direct and indirect effect and will extend the approach to mediation typically employed in epidemiology and the social sciences to settings with interactions, non-linearities, and time-varying exposures. Prerequisite: Familiarity with regression analysis and potential outcomes.
  • Course Goals: Upon successful completion of this course, you should be able to: • Explain when traditional methods for mediation fail • Define the concepts about mediation from causal inference • Conduct regression methods for mediation and interpret results of such analyses.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. To understand the assumptions of a counterfactual frame in formulating mediation analyses questions 2. To identify different types of causal effects (e.g. total, direct, indirect) and their mathematical relations with each other 3. To correctly specify regression models in conducting mediation analyses 2. To master the use of statistical software code to conduct mediation analyses and the interpretation of output

EPID721: APPLIED SENSITIVITY ANALYSES IN EPIDEMIOLOGY

  • Graduate level
  • Summer term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Introductory epidemiology. Introductory biostatistics or introduction to generalized linear models. Working knowledge of a general statistical software like SAS, Stata or R
  • Advisory Prerequisites: An introductory course on causal inference (e.g. EPID 780) is highly recommended
  • Description: This course introduces how to think about and conduct sensitivity analyses for uncontrolled confounding, selection bias and measurement error in epidemiologic studies. The course will demonstrate the intuition behind the separate and combined consequences of these sources of bias on estimating and inferring causal effects. It will provide practical quantitative skills for assessing the sensitivity of analytical results to these biases in order to aid credible causal modeling and inference using empirical epidemiologic studies
  • Course Goals: 1. Learn to articulate the different of impact of uncontrolled confounding, selection bias and measurement error separately and in combination. 2. Learn to depict visually these sources of bias and understand their impact using causal diagrams. 3. Learn to conduct quantitative bias analyses including multiple-bias modeling. 4. Learn to reason about and obtain bias parameters for sensitivity analyses. 5. Learn to apply and interpret probabilistic sensitivity analyses in epidemiologic studies.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Learn to articulate the different of impact of uncontrolled confounding, selection bias and measurement error separately and in combination. 2. Learn to depict visually these sources of bias and understand their impact using causal diagrams. 3. Learn to conduct quantitative bias analyses including multiple-bias modeling. 4. Learn to reason about and obtain bias parameters for sensitivity analyses. 5. Learn to apply and interpret probabilistic sensitivity analyses in epidemiologic studies.

EPID722: Medical Product Epidemiology and Global Regulation

  • Graduate level
  • Summer term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course addresses the use and effects of medical products -These products are regulated worldwide. These regulatory requirements have stimulated the need for data and varied studies on very large populations to establish the safety of the products and the concomitant conditions that help determine their safety and effectiveness.

EPID743: Applied Linear Regression

  • Graduate level
  • Summer term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Summer 2016
  • Prerequisites: Intro Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Perm. Instr
  • Description: This course is an introduction to the most powerful analysis technique in statistics: linear regression. This course discusses the applications of linear regression models to medical research and public health data. We will focus on the two major goals of linear models: (1) Explanation: the estimation of associations, and (2) Prediction: the use of models to predict subject outcomes, as with diagnostic tests. Specific topics include graphical exploratory data analysis, assumptions behind simple and multiple linear regression, use of categorical explanatory variables, identification of appropriate transformations of explanatory and/or outcome variables, assessment of predictor/outcome associations through hypothesis testing, identification of confounding and effect modification, assessment of model fit, and model selection techniques.

EPID762: Analysis of Complex Sample Survey Data

  • Graduate level
  • Summer term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: . A first course in survey sampling or research methods and a basic understanding of sampling concepts such as stratification, cluster sampling and weighting is required.
  • Description: This course will present a practical overview of modern techniques for analyzing survey data in a way that accounts for the complex features of the sample design that gave rise to the sample of units that was ultimately surveyed

EPID780: APPLIED EPIDEMIOLOGIC ANALYSIS FOR CAUSAL INFERENCE

  • Graduate level
  • Summer term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: EPID 701 or EPID 503 or EPID 600 or EPID 601 AND EPID 709 or BIOSTAT 501 or BIOSTAT 521
  • Description: This course focuses on regression models of potential outcomes for the estimation of causal parameters in epidemiologic research. One day of theoretical background will be followed by 4 days of lectures on a range of techniques along with a computer laboratory portion in the afternoons comprised of hands-on exercises using the Stata statistical software package (V13 or higher). Techniques covered include propensity score matching, inverse probability weighting for confounder control and for censoring, marginal structural models, the parametric g-formula, and some introduction to econometric techniques such as differences-in-differences. Emphasis is on understanding the causal models, generating analysis with software code, and interpreting the resulting estimates. Prerequisites: Students should have at least one basic epidemiology course and some background in Stata, along with a working knowledge of regression and other standard statistical methodology common in basic epidemiological analysis

EPID793: Complex Systems Modeling for Public Health Research

  • Graduate level
  • Summer term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Summer 2016
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course will provide an introduction to two major complex systems science modeling techniques with wide applicability to public health. We will cover an introductory overview of complex systems modeling in general, and systems dynamics and agent-based modeling in particular. We will discuss model applications, best practices, and more advanced practical topics such as team-building, computation, funding, and publication. We will provide extensive hands-on lab experience during each section of the course. At the completion of the course the student will be able to explain current and potential future roles of complex systems science in public health, describe the respective advantages/disadvantages of each method covered, and will be expected to produce a draft proposal for applying one of the two system science methods to a particular problem. Students will become informed consumers of complex systems research, will be prepared to actively participate in interdisciplinary teams using the modeling techniques, and will be well positioned to incorporate systems science methods into their own research. Prerequisite: Relevant background in public health.

EPID799: Qualitative Methods for Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Summer term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Summer 2016
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course provides an overview of qualitative research methods that can complement and enhance epidemiologic studies. It is useful for epidemiologists interested in understanding the social, cultural and behavioral aspects of public health issues within communities. Students will learn how to integrate qualitative methods into epidemiology research and how to select appropriate qualitative methods. Sessions will cover: principles of qualitative research, study design, participant recruitment, data collection methods (interviews, group discussion, and observation), writing and presenting qualitative research and assessing research quality. The course uses participatory learning activities to build core skills. The course is valuable for public health professionals, staff at government and non-government agencies focusing on health and disease, graduate students and researchers. Skills learnt in this course will be valuable for conducting epidemiology research and evaluating qualitative research components in funding proposals, projects and publications.
  • Course Goals: Students will learn how to integrate qualitative methods into epidemiology research and how to select appropriate qualitative methods. Sessions will cover: principles of qualitative research, study design, participant recruitment, data collection methods (interviews, group discussion, and observation), writing and presenting qualitative research and assessing research quality. The course uses participatory learning activities to build core skills.

EPID891: Advanced Readings in Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Students will review assigned readings on the epidemiology or natural history of specific infections or chronic diseases or on host or environmental factors associated with disease, or on epidemiological methods and their application. May be elected more than once

EPID990: Dissertation Research/Pre-Candidate

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: For students who have NOT reached candidacy yet.

EPID995: Dissertation Research/Candidate

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student who has been admitted to status as a candidate

HBEHED578: Practical Projects

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Practical projects in the application of theory and principles of Health Behavior and Health Education to individual and community-based public health settings. Course requirements include an approved practical project related to Health Behavior and Health Education in consultation with a faculty advisor. THE EXPERIENCE IS REPORTED IN AN INTEGRATIVE PAPER DEMONSTRATING THE SCIENTIFIC APPLICATION OF HBHE THEORIES AND PRINCIPLES TO THE PRACTICAL PROJECT. May be elected more than once. Enrollment limited to Health Behavior and Health Education majors with at least two full terms of prior registration.

HBEHED608: Integrative Seminar on Healthy Cities

  • Graduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course will fulfill the "Integrative Seminar" requirement for the Healthy Cities Graduate Certificate. The course combines public health, public policy, and built environment perspectives within one classroom. Classes are organized around guest speakers from various disciplines who will discuss the significance of interdisciplinary approaches to addressing urban health issues.
  • Course Goals: The integrative seminar is designed to combine perspectives from public health, public policy, and the built environment within a single classroom. Professionals working in these three fields have different ways of understanding the world, use different terminology to describe the phenomenon of interest, use different standards of evidence, and frame the scope of the problem in different ways. Students learn about these different approaches through the required coursework. Then, in the integrative seminar, the certificate students come together as a cohort to explore these differences and build cross-disciplinary understanding. To facilitate this process, class sessions are organized around a guest speaker series. Speakers from a variety of disciplines meet with the students to discuss the benefits and challenges of using interdisciplinary collaborations to address public health in urban contexts.
  • Learning Objectives: ·Explain effects of environmental factors on a population's health. ·Explain the social, political and economic determinants of health and how they contribute to population health and health inequities.
  • This course is cross-listed with URP 612 002 in the Urban Planning department.

HBEHED625: Research in Health Behavior

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Inst.
  • Description: Individual work on a problem in the area of health behavior relevant to program effectiveness in public health, under the tutorial guidance of an appropriate staff member. Regular conferences are arranged to discuss research designs, proposed problem solutions, methods for data collection and analysis. The investigation is reported in a paper, which may be submitted for publication. May be elected more than once.

HBEHED644: Readings in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Review of literature on selected topics in health behavior, health education or related areas under guidance of faculty member. Critical analysis; written and oral reports. May be taken more than once for a total not to exceed 6 credit hours.

HBEHED675: Culminating Seminar in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course complements the HBHE MPH core curriculum by assisting students with integrating their overall learning experience in the program via a series of culminating assignments. These are designed to support students in the process of reflecting on their internship and translating that knowledge into a professional presentation for relevant audiences. They also guide students in the successful completion of the Integrated Learning Experience.
  • Course Goals: The activities in this course help students: Consider, define and integrate learning from their internship experiences. Select appropriate communication strategies and tailor content to relevant audiences. Write in an organized, logical and professional manner. Integrate core skills from the HBHE MPH curriculum, including interpreting data, applying theory, examining health inequities and specifying approaches to understanding and addressing important public health issues in the completion of a culminating assignment.
  • Learning Objectives: This course does not substantially cover material related to Foundational Learning Objectives.

HBEHED710: Special MPH Topics in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: Master's level seminar designed to provide an extensive review of a number of substantive and methods and skill areas in health behavior and health education. Readings, discussion and assignments are organized around issues of mutual interest to faculty and students. Reviews and reports on topics required in the areas selected. May be elected more than once.

HBEHED900: Research in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 2-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Research work undertaken by doctoral students in collaboration with faculty advisers, including participation in on-going departmental research activities. Open only to doctoral students in Health Behavior and Health Education. May be elected more than once.

HBEHED990: Dissertation/Pre-Candidate

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Half Term (IIIA or IIIB, 1-4 credits) Election for dissertation work by doctoral students in Health Behavior and Health Education who are not yet admitted to status as a candidate.

HBEHED995: Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Half Term (IIIA or IIIB, 1-4 credits) Election for dissertation work by doctoral students admitted to status as candidate.

HMP603: Organization and Management of Healthcare Systems

  • Graduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: HMP Masters Standing or Perm Instr
  • Description: This course is one of two HMP courses that fulfills the organization theory/management degree requirement. These courses provide knowledge of the theories of organizations, the use of leadership, management processes, and organizational structures and outcomes. Specific topics include governance, strategic management and marketing, human resources management, and process improvement. This course is designed for future managers and leaders of health care organizations and those who expect to have extensive involvement with them from the perspective of buyers, insurers, or policy makers. The course provides students with knowledge about how the best health care provider organizations deliver high quality, cost effective health care, how they respond to their environment, and how they reach and implement decisions about future activities.
Concentration Competencies that HMP603 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
HMP MPH Develop strategies to continually improve the long-term success and viability of an organization, based on an analysis of the business, demographic, ethno-cultural, political, and regulatory implications of decisions HMP603, HMP604

HMP604: Organization and Management of Health Advocacy and Community-Based Non-profits

  • Graduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: HMP Graduate Standing or PI
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course is one of two HMP courses that fulfills the organization theory/management degree requirement. These courses provide knowledge of the theories of organizations, the use of leadership, management processes, and organizational structures and outcomes. Specific topics include governance, strategic management and marketing, human resources management, and process improvement. Nonprofit advocacy and community-based organizations face unique challenges related to their mission and ownership, including a greater need to motivate employees through culture and to integrate volunteers into the workforce and to manage complex stakeholder relations within communities. All this must be done with scarce resources and frequently, small budgets and workforces. This course includes analysis of the goals, environmental conditions and organizational structures of nonprofit health organizations, including a variety of smaller (and largely, non-medical) community-based nonprofits. Examples of the best managerial practices for these types of organizations and of commonly known NGOs and other nonprofits are used throughout the course.
  • Syllabus for HMP604
Concentration Competencies that HMP604 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
HMP MPH Develop strategies to continually improve the long-term success and viability of an organization, based on an analysis of the business, demographic, ethno-cultural, political, and regulatory implications of decisions HMP603, HMP604

HMP630: Business of Biology

  • Graduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • This course is cross-listed with BA 518 in the Business Administration department.

HMP640: Program Evaluation in Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff Shih, Shu-Fang
  • Not offered 2019-2020
  • Prerequisites: grad status
  • Description: The Purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the fundamentals of evaluation and research as applied to public health programs, policies and other types of interventions. The course covers impact, outcomes, process and participatory evaluation, and a number of research designs common in public health evaluation research, Students will gain skills in framing evaluation questions. In addition, students will gain skills needed to understand and critique published evaluation literature, and skills in measurement/data collection strategies. Class format includes lecture, discussion articles, and small group exercises. For final project, students will design and write and evaluation plan in the format of a proposal for funding.

HMP646: Leadership Development

  • Graduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff Killaly, Catherine
  • Not offered 2019-2020
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Reviews theoretical foundations and models of leadership. Fosters students' insight into their leadership potential, experiences, and skills. Uses self-assessment exercises, guest speakers, role-plays, and other activities to stimulate student learning. Students are expected to have developed their own comprehensive leadership and career development plan by the end of the course.

HMP648: Evaluation & Research Methods for Health informatics and Learning Systems

  • Graduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff Friedman, Charles
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course provides a foundational introduction to empirical methods, both quantitative and qualitative, that are applicable to health informatics and learning health systems, and that support both evaluation and research studies.
  • This course is cross-listed with HMP 648 in the LHS660/SI648 department.

HMP652: Health Law

  • Graduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: HMP 600, 601
  • Description: The purpose of this course is to introduce public health students, especially those interested in health administration and management, to the legal issues they are likely to face in managing a health care organization. The goals of the course are for students to understand generally: the functions of and interaction between courts, legislatures, regulators; the role of the courts in health policy and health care delivery; how to recognize legal issues and communicate with attorneys; how law will affect students as strategic thinkers in health care positions; how to apply basic tort and contract principles; and how to apply basic corporate law and antitrust principles. Specific topics will vary, but will usually include: liability; health care institutions as corporations; antitrust; tax exemption; privacy and confidentiality; regulatory oversight of health care systems, including quality of care; legal requirements for access to health care; nondiscrimination; and general employment issues. This class can be taken as an elective or in fulfillment of the law/politics requirement.
  • Syllabus for HMP652

HMP653: Law and Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: The purposes of this course are to examine the legal context of the relationship between the individual and the community, and to understand public health regulation in the context of a market-driven system. The goals of the course are for students to understand generally: constitutional authority and limits on governmental intervention in public health (i.e., individual rights vs. society's rights); the functions of and interactions between courts, legislatures, and regulators; how law will affect students as strategic thinkers in public health positions; how to recognize legal issues and communicate with attorneys; and the process of public health regulation and potential legal barriers to public health intervention strategies. Specific topics will vary, but will usually include: the nature and scope of public health authority; constitutional constraints on public health initiatives; tobacco control; youth violence; injury prevention; the spread of communicable disease; and regulating environmental risk. This class can be taken as an elective, in fulfillment of the law/politics requirement, or as a BIC requirement.
  • Syllabus for HMP653
Concentration Competencies that HMP653 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
HMP MPH Use legal reasoning as a tool for analysis, communication, strategy and planning HMP653

HMP669: Database Systems and Internet Applications in Health Care

  • Graduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Not offered 2019-2020
  • Prerequisites: Grad status
  • Description: This course covers relation database theory and database-web systems with applications to health care. The students are expected to develop a working knowledge of design, implementation, administration and maintenance of small to medium relational database systems. The students will also be exposed to current technology for deployment, use and administration of relational databases through the Internet.
  • Syllabus for HMP669

HMP680: Special Topics in Health Management and Policy

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: Lecture, seminars and readings selected on a current or emerging topic or theme in health, management and policy. The specific material and format will vary by semester and instructor.
  • Course Goals: Will vary by topic and instructor.

HMP690: Readings in Health Management and Policy

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status and Perm Instr
  • Description: Directed readings or research on selected topics and problems relevant to health management and policy. May be elected more than once.

HMP694: MS-HSR Thesis Analysis and Presentation

  • Graduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Not offered 2019-2020
  • Prerequisites: MS-HSR second year degree status
  • Description: The student will produce a thesis, based on independent research (with guidance and mentoring from HMP faculty), to be completed in the second year. The thesis must present original research, as opposed to a literature review or some sort of "thought piece" or opinion statement. The research can involve analysis of primary or secondary data, and the analysis involved can be either qualitative or quantitative. The only requirement is that the thesis involve some sort of data analysis to answer one or more research questions of interest to health services or health policy research.

HMP833: Research Topics in Sociology and Health Care Organization

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: HMP doctoral students or P.I.
  • Description: HSOP Program requirements. A topic in sociology and health care organization-policy is selected each term for detailed critical, theoretical, and methodological analysis leading to development, in class, of propositions aimed at advancing scientific status of the area of inquiry. Analysis and development of content follows logic of the research paradigm. Required of students with a sociology cognate in the doctoral program in Health Services Organization and Policy

HMP835: Research Practicum

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 3-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: HMP 809, Perm Instr
  • Description: The purpose of this course is to allow each student, early in his or her doctoral career, to gain experience in the actual performance of health services research. The experience will enable students to build sound research skills and to gain knowledge of the nature of inquiry in their discipline as well as in the field of health services research. Each student in the HSOP program is expected to elect a total of 6 credits in HMP 835.
Concentration Competencies that HMP835 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
HMP Health Services Organization and Policy PhD Critically evaluate the prior literature in health services organization and policy, including motivation, theory, data quality, methods, results, conclusions, and policy recommendations HMP803-806, HMP802, HMP835
HMP Health Services Organization and Policy PhD Develop research questions grounded in theory to expand knowledge about health services organization and policy HMP803-806, HMP802, HMP835
HMP Health Services Organization and Policy PhD Create a rigorous study design to test the research questions posed and to understand the strengths and limitations of that study design HMP826, HMP809, HMP835, HMP809
HMP Health Services Organization and Policy PhD Apply advanced quantitative and/or qualitative methods appropriate for health services organization and policy research appropriately in one's own research HMP826, HMP835
HMP Health Services Organization and Policy PhD Disseminate rigorous research findings through clear, persuasive written and oral communication to both peers and non-technical audiences. HMP826, HMP835

HMP990: Dissertation/Precandidates

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to status as candidate.

HMP995: Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students admitted as candidates

NUTR578: Practical Projects

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Practical Projects is the application of theory and principles of Nutritional Sciences to individual community-based public health settings. Course requirements include an approved practical project related to Nutritional Sciences in consultation with a faculty advisor. The experience is documented in an integrative paper demonstrating the scientific application of NS theories and principles to the practical project. May be elected more than once. Enrollment is limited to NS students with at least two full terms completed prior to registration.
  • Course Goals: To provide students with the opportunity to apply theory and principles of Nutritional Sciences to individual community-based public health settings.

NUTR697: Readings in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Supervised study/review of a selected topic in nutritional sciences. May be elected more than once for a maximum of six credits.

NUTR698: Research in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Original research investigation of a special topic in nutritional sciences.

NUTR699: Masters Thesis in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm of Thesis Advisor
  • Description: This course shall be elected by students enrolled in Master's degree programs that require a formal written thesis as a condition of program completion. The thesis shall be defended in front of the student's thesis committee. The course grade will reflect the student's accomplishments relative to the thesis and its defense. The course is to be elected only once.

NUTR796: Special Topics in Nutritional Sciences

NUTR899: Advanced Research in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Must be a PhD student in Nutritional Sciences
  • Description: Original investigations of a specific research topic in Nutritional Sciences. Designed for doctoral students performing research prior to passing their qualifying exams. Students will complete two separate rotations with faculty members for a minimum of 1 credit each. This course may be elected more than once.
  • Course Goals: Expose PhD students to Nutritional Sciences research opportunities in order to assist students in exploring interest areas and a dissertation topic.

NUTR990: Dissertation Research/Pre-Candidate

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Nutritional Sciences Doctoral Student
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to status as a candidate.
Concentration Competencies that NUTR990 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition PhD Create a rigorous study design to test a research question based on a critical evaluation of prior literature NUTR990, NUTR995, NUTR830
NUTR Nutritional Interventions PhD Create a rigorous intervention study design to test a research question based on a critical evaluation of prior literature NUTR990, NUTR995, Preliminary Exam

NUTR995: Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Nutritional Sciences Doctoral Student
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student who has been admitted to status as a candidate
Concentration Competencies that NUTR995 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition PhD Create a rigorous study design to test a research question based on a critical evaluation of prior literature NUTR990, NUTR995, NUTR830
NUTR Nutritional Interventions PhD Create a rigorous intervention study design to test a research question based on a critical evaluation of prior literature NUTR990, NUTR995, Preliminary Exam

PUBHLTH411: Making Change: Experiential Learning in Effective Public Health Policy Advocacy

  • Undergraduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Martin, Jenifer Staff
  • Not offered 2019-2020
  • Prerequisites: No enforced prereq. This course is a corequisite to PUBHLTH 410 - students who elect this course must also be enrolled in PUBHLTH 410.
  • Description: In this course, students will apply knowledge obtained in Professor Wolfson's course to a current state policy issue pending in Lansing. Students will gain strong written and verbal communication skills by developing an advocacy strategy, preparing written materials, and meeting with policymakers in Lansing to advance their policy goal.
  • Course Goals: Provide experiential skill-building in executing advocacy strategies that advance public health goals and policies to policy and other decision makers.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Appraise the political landscape and stakeholders that are important for making policy change on a given public health topic. 2. Apply principles of policy-making, policy change theory, and policy advocacy to real life public health problems. 3. Effectively advocate for public health change at the local, state and federal level. 4. Develop strong written and verbal communication skills. 5. Define and frame public health problems in such a way that inspires policy change. 6. Analyze the legislative, administrative and judicial intervention points for policymaking and identify where to effectively target advocacy efforts. 7. Identify and evaluate advocacy strategies, such as coalition building, grassroots engagement, and paid and earned media outreach, in order to create specific advocacy campaigns. 8. Develop personal and communication skills to effectively translate and advocate for public health improvements to policymakers, the press and the public.

PUBHLTH477: Readings in Public Health

  • Undergraduate level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Youatt, Emily Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Review of literature or directed readings on selected topic related to one or more areas of public health.
  • Course Goals: The goals of this course are to: 1. Introduce students to peer-reviewed literature in public health 2. Improve students' ability to locate, use, evaluate, and synthesize public health information
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of the term, students should be able to find and appropriately interpret and critically evaluate the findings in peer-reviewed scientific literature.

PUBHLTH478: Practical Projects in Public Health

  • Undergraduate level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff Youatt, Emily
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Practical projects allows undergraduate students to explore community-based public health settings. Project must be related to public health practice and developed in consultation with a faculty advisor. Students will write an integrative paper analyzing the organization's role in the public health system and critically reflecting on their experience.
  • Course Goals: To provide students an opportunity to engage with local-level public health professionals and organizations that engage in public health practice.
  • Learning Objectives: As part of this course students will consider the following concepts: 1. Health promotion at a population level 2. Community dynamics and the cultural context in which public health professionals work 3. Organizational structure and dynamics, including the organization's role in the public health system 4. How to operate professionally in a public health organization (including but not limited to: personal work ethic, professionalism, teamwork, and leadership)

PUBHLTH481: Public Health Practice and Professionalism

  • Undergraduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Youatt, Emily Staff
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH 200
  • Advisory Prerequisites: PUBHLTH 381 or PUBHLTH 382 or PUBHLTH 383
  • Description: Students will apply their knowledge and skills to address current public health challenges. Professional development and engagement with public health agencies will prepare students to work in the field.
  • Course Goals: PUBHLTH 481 is an introduction to public health practice that will foster creative and systematic thinking through experiential learning that prepares students to work collaboratively with government agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and community partners, addressing current public health challenges.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of the course students should (be able to): 1. Explain what public health practice is and distinguish it from public health research; 2. Integrate knowledge with theory and practice to propose solutions to current public health challenges (esp. those that impact population health and contribute to health disparities); 3. Describe public health infrastructure, including the systems, competencies, frameworks, relationships, and resources that enable public health agencies to perform their core functions and essential services; 4. Assess community health needs, identifying key problems and assets, and create a conceptual framework that informs decision making; 5. Prioritize working with communities, agencies and other stakeholders in culturally appropriate ways; 6. Engage in cross-disciplinary, team-based discussion and project design; 7. Collect high quality data to analyze, evaluate and disseminate as public health information via appropriate channels; 8. Develop a strategy to promote health - from broad policy to direct intervention - that accounts for available resources, stakeholder interests, and community needs; 9. Describe a process for evaluation that assesses and improves the quality of a public health strategy and determines its effectiveness; 10. Exhibit professionalism and an ability to think critically while communicating and practicing public health; 11. Recognize the importance of public health work that is performed outside of an academic setting, and how learning in this context contributes to professional advancement in the field.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH481

PUBHLTH615: Public Health in Action: National

  • Graduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: An intensive course to prepare students for a culminating week-long practice-based experience designed to address existing and emerging public health priorities as defined by the respective communities and their academic partners. Students will be engaged directly with communities and exposed to the contextual, cultural, political and economic factors impacting health.
  • Course Goals: Course Goal: To provide an action-based experience for public health graduate students to address 'real time' public health issues in vulnerable communities. Course Objectives: 1.Provide students with the opportunity to develop and apply theoretical and practical skills to current public health issues impacting the well being of communities. 2.Actively engage and immerse students as partners in surfacing information, data and solutions in response to the today's public health challenges. 3.Strengthen student understanding of how public health science and practice can be used to meaningfully address complex population health issues in communities. 4.Develop skills in working with and in diverse communities.

PUBHLTH616: Public Health in Action: International

  • Graduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Permission by Instructor
  • Description: An intensive course to prepare students for a culminating week-long international practice-based experience designed to address existing and emerging public health priorities as defined by the respective communities and their academic partners. Students will be engaged directly and exposed to the contextual, cultural, political and economic factors impacting health.
  • Course Goals: Provide students with hands-on applied learning through direct involvement in population health research.

PUBHLTH741: Interdisciplinary Problem Solving

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Advisory Prerequisites: graduate standing
  • Description: "Interdisciplinary Problem Solving" is a course offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). Through a team-based, experiential, and interdisciplinary learning model, small groups of U-M graduate and professional students work with faculty to explore and offer solutions to emerging, complex problems.
  • Course Goals: Will vary term to term
  • Learning Objectives: Will vary term to term
  • This course is cross-listed with LAW741/PUBPOL710/SW741 in the Law School, Public Policy, Social Work department.

PUBHLTH796: Special Topics in Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-5 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course will be used by faculty members to teach special or emerging topics related to Public Health. The specific material and format will vary by semester and instructor.
  • Course Goals: Will vary by topic and instructor.
  • Learning Objectives: Will vary by topic and instructor.