Fall Courses

BIOSTAT501 Introduction to Biostatistics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Braun, Thomas
  • Prerequisites: SPH MPH or permission of instructor
  • Description: Statistical methods and principles necessary for understanding and interpreting data used in public health and policy evaluation and formation. Topics include descriptive statistics, graphical data summary, sampling, statistical comparison of groups, correlation, and regression. Students will learn via lecture, group discussions, critical reading of published research, and analysis of data.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT501

BIOSTAT521 Applied Biostatistics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Zawistowski, Matt
  • Prerequisites: Calculus
  • Description: Fundamental statistical concepts related to the practice of public health: descriptive statistics; probability; sampling; statistical distributions; estimation; hypothesis testing; chi-square tests; simple and multiple linear regression; one-way ANOVA. . Taught at a more advanced mathematical level than Biostat 503. Use of the computer in statistical analysis.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT521

BIOSTAT523 Statistical Methods in Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Zhou, Xiang
  • Prerequisites: EPID501 or EPID601 or EPID600; AND BIOSTAT522
  • Description: Statistical methods commonly used in environmental epidemiology. Emphasis on choosing appropriate statistical methods and subsequent interpretation. Topics include probability, measures of association and risk, sample size calculations, SMR and PMR analysis, logistic regression and survival analysis.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT523

BIOSTAT600 Introduction to Biostatistics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Sanchez, Brisa Welch, Kathy
  • Prerequisites: Admission to a degree program in Biostatistics
  • Description: The purpose of this course is to review basic applied statistical concepts and tools and to introduce the SPH computer network and statistical software.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT600

BIOSTAT601 Probability and Distribution Theory

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Wang, Lu
  • Prerequisites: Three terms of calculus
  • Description: Fundamental probability and distribution theory needed for statistical inference. Probability, discrete and continuous distributions, expectation, generating functions, limit theorems, transformations, sampling theory.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT601

BIOSTAT605 Intro to SAS Statistical Programming

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff Welch, Kathy
  • Prerequisites: One course in introductory statistics; Co-requisite Biostat 601 or equivalent or Perm. Instr
  • Description: This course provides incoming master's students in biostatistics with basic experience in SAS programming for data set creation and manipulation, an introduction to SAS macros, and SAS matrix manipulation.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT605

BIOSTAT606 Introduction to Biocomputing

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Boehnke, Michael L Grant, Barry Jiang, Hui Kang, Hyun Min Kidd, Jeff Kitzman, Jacob Mills, Ryan Sartor, Maureen
  • Prerequisites: Graduate Standing
  • Description: This short course introduces basic computational environments and tools to graduate students with limited prior experience. It will provide an introduction to UNIX systems, software compilation / installation, cluster job management as well as data formats, management, and visualization. A brief introduction to scripting programming languages will also be presented.
  • Course Goals: Students enrolled in the class will develop skills to accelerate their research in computational research environments. Topics will include an intensive introduction to (a) UNIX systems and software management, (b) data processing and simple programming, (c) data formats and visualization, and (d) software version and cluster control. This training will provide a computational foundation that will allow students to focus on the theoretical and biological aspects of their research.
  • Competencies: After completing this class, students are expected to be able to attain the following competencies: Core Competencies: -Navigate and organize UNIX files and folders -Compile and install software in UNIX environments -Understand basic programming data structures and processes -Create simple scripts to manage and analyze data -Utilize and apply popular file formats to modern large-scale data sets -Apply proper visualization tools and strategies to view data -Utilize software versioning technologies for documenting and organizing software -Utilize high-throughput computing clusters for parallel data processing
  • This course is cross-listed with Biostat 606 = HG 606 = Bioinfo 606.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT606

BIOSTAT610 Readings in Biostatistics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s):
  • Prerequisites: One of Biostat 503, Biostat 524, Biostat 553 or Biostat 601/Biostat 602
  • Description: Independent study in a special topic under the guidance of a faculty member. May be elected more than once. Enrollment is limited to biostatistics majors.

BIOSTAT615 Statistical Computing

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Kang, Jian
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: A survey of key algorithms for statistical computing and its applications in Biostatistics. The course will cover fundamental computational techniques for dynamic programming, sorting, and searching, as well statistical methods for random number generation, numerical integration, function optimization, Markov-Chain Monte Carlo, and the E-M algorithm. Enables students to understand numerical results produced by a computer and to implement their own statistical methods.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT615

BIOSTAT619 Clinical Trials

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Murray, Susan
  • Prerequisites: Biostatistics 601 and Biostatistics 651
  • Description: This course is designed for individuals with a strong quantitative background who are interested in the statistical design and analysis aspects of clinical trials and the interface between statistics and policy in this area
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT619

BIOSTAT650 Applied Statistics I: Linear Regression

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Banerjee, Mousumi
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT601
  • Description: Graphical methods, simple and multiple linear regression; simple, partial and multiple correlation; estimation; hypothesis testing, model building and diagnosis; introduction to nonparametric regression; introduction to smoothing methods (e.g., lowess) The course will include applications to real data.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT650

BIOSTAT653 Applied Statistics III: Longitudinal Analysis

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Wu, Zhenke
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT650 and concurrent enrollment in BIOSTAT651
  • Description: This course provides an overview of statistical models and methodologies for analyzing repeated measures/longitudinal data. The course covers general linear models and linear mixed models for analyzing correlated continuous data, as well as marginal (i.e. GEE), conditional (i.e. generalized linear mixed model) and transition models for analyzing correlated discrete data.
  • Competencies: Students are expected to achieve the following competencies: (1) understand the statistical methods used to analyze correlated and longitudinal data in a variety of settings and with a variety of outcome variables; (2) become well-versed in the application of core statistical techniques in analyzing repeated measures identifying an appropriate design and selecting the statistical methods required to analyze the data; (3) master software (e.g. SAS procedures) to perform longitudinal analyses; (4) develop the knowledge to interpret and communicate the clinical and scientific meaning of the results to both statisticians and clinicians/scientists.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT653

BIOSTAT666 Statistical Models and Numerical Methods in Human Genetics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Lee, Seunggeun
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 602 or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Introduction to current statistical methods used in human genetics. Topics will include sampling designs in human genetics, gene frequency estimation, the coalescent method for simulation of DNA sequences, linkage analysis, tests of association, detection of errors in genetic data, and the multi-factorial model. The course will include a simple overview of genetic data and terminology and will proceed with a review of numerical techniques frequently employed in human genetics.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT666

BIOSTAT675 Survival Time Analysis

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Li, Yi
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 602 and Biostat 650
  • Description: Concepts and methods for analyzing survival time data obtained from following individuals until occurrence of an event or their loss to follow-up. Survival time models, clinical life tables, survival distributions, mathematical and graphical methods for evaluating goodness of fit, comparison of treatment groups, regression models, proportional hazards models, censoring mechanisms.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT675

BIOSTAT680 Applications of Stochastic Processes I

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Wen, William
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 601 and Math 450 or equiv
  • Description: Conditional distributions, probability generating functions, convolutions, discrete and continuous parameter, Markov chains, medical and health related applications.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT680

BIOSTAT682 Applied Bayesian Inference

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Kang, Jian
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 602, Biostat 650 and Biostat 651
  • Description: Introduction to Bayesian Inference. Bayesian large sample inference, relationship with maximum likelihood. Choice of model, including prior distribution. Bayesian approaches to regression generalized linear models, categorical data, and hierarchical models. Empirical Bayes methods. Comparison with frequentist methods. Bayesian computational methods. Assessment of sensitivity to model assumptions. Emphasis on biomedical applications.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT682

BIOSTAT685 Elements of Nonparametric Statistics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Zhang, Min
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 602 or STAT 511, and Biostat 650 or Perm. Instr
  • Description: First half covers theory and applications of rank and randomization tests: sampling and randomization models, randomization t-test, Wilcoxon rank sum and signed rank tests, Kruskal-Wallis test, asymptotic result under randomization, relative efficiency; second half covers theory and applications of nonparametric regression: smoothing methods, including kernel estimators, local linear regression, smoothing splines, and regression splines, methods for choosing the smoothing parameter, including unbiased risk estimation and cross-validation, introduction to additive models.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT685

BIOSTAT698 Modern Statistical Methods in Epidemiologic Studies

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Berrocal, Veronica Park, Sung Kyun
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: EPID600, BIOSTAT522 and BIOSTAT523 for epid students; BIOSTAT650, BIOSTAT651 for biostat students
  • Description: The goal of this pilot course is to create an interdisciplinary educational experience for Ph.D. students in Epidemiology (also available as an optional elective for Masters students in Biostatistics) through a uniquely designed course that contains lectures on advanced biostatistical methods, but places them in the context of epidemiological applications.
  • Course Goals: Students enrolled in the class will learn about cutting edge statistical methods in these four contemporary topics that arise frequently in the present scientific context. These four topics are: (a) Modern techniques for model building and variable selection; (b) Methods for analyzing longitudinal data; (c) Spatial regression methods; (d) Methods for studies of interaction/effect modification. The course will equip the new generation epidemiologists with state-of-the-art statistical methods in these domains, and teach them the craft of translating a practical problem into mathematical equations. However, the entire theoretical learning process will be placed in the context of sophisticated modeling of data from large complex studies with a focused problem to solve. Data for the projects will come from two studies that Professors Park and Mendes de Leon are involved with: the Normative Aging Study (NAS) and the Chicago Health and Aging Project (CHAP).
  • Competencies: After completing this class, students are expected to be able to attain the following competencies: Core Competencies: -Describe preferred methodological alternatives to commonly used statistical methods when assumptions are not met. -Distinguish among the different measurement scales and the implications for selection of statistical methods to be used based on these distinctions. -Apply descriptive techniques commonly used to summarize public health data. -Apply common statistical methods for inference. -Apply descriptive and inferential methodologies according to the type of study design for answering a particular research question. -Interpret results of statistical analyses found in public health studies. Biostatistics Competencies: -Develop knowledge to communicate and collaborate effectively with scientists in a variety of health-related disciplines to which biostatistics are applied (e.g. public health, medicine, genetics, biology; psychology; economics; management and policy). -Become well-versed in the application of core statistical techniques (biostatistical inference, linear regression, generalized linear models, nonparametric statistical methods, linear mixed models) and 4-5 selected statistical specialization techniques. -Select appropriate techniques and apply them to the processing of data from health studies. -Interpret the results of statistical analysis and convert them into a language understandable to the broad statistical community. -Develop written and oral presentation skills and other scientific reporting skills, based on statistical analyses for public health, medical and basic scientists and educated lay audiences Epidemiology Competencies: -Employ state-of-the-art statistical and other quantitative methods in the analysis of epidemiologic data. -Demonstrate a thorough understanding of causal inference, sources of bias, and methods to improve the validity of epidemiologic studies. -Understand the principles and methods of data-collection and data-processing procedures in the design and conduct of epidemiologic research, with sound knowledge of measurement validity and reliability, data quality control, data management, documentation, and security
  • This course is cross-listed with EPID815.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT698

BIOSTAT800 Seminar in Biostatistics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 0.5 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Han, Peisong
  • Prerequisites: Graduate level Biostatistics students only
  • Description: Presentations and discussions of current consulting and research problems. Enrollment limited to biostatistics majors. Students must attend 2/3 of all seminars offered during the semester to receive credit. Maximum credit is 0.5 per semester. No more than 1 credit total allowed. May only be taken a maximum of 2 semesters.

BIOSTAT801 Advanced Inference I

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Tsodikov, Alexander
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 601, Biostat 602, and MATH 451 or equivalent
  • Description: This is the first course of the sequence that covers advanced topics in probability theory, theory of point estimation, theory of hypothesis testing, and related large sample theory. This sequence replaces STAT 610/611 as biostatistics Ph.D. requirements.
  • Course Goals: The goal of the sequence is to provide broad and deep theoretical training to Biostatistics Ph.D. students. Such training is essential for success in their thesis research and their future career.
  • Competencies: The following competencies under Appendix 2.6.c in ``University of Michigan School of Public Health Self-Study -- Appendices" for Biostatistics PhD students are met: 2. Statistical techniques a. Advanced Mathematical Statistics b. Generalized Linear and Mixed Models c. Advanced Biostatistical Inference d. Stochastic Processes j. Bioinformatics and analysis of high-throughput biological data k. Survival analysis m. Bayesian inference techniques n. Nonparametric statistical methods 3. Mathematical foundation The graduate must acquire mathematical proficiency to be able to pursue theoretical development of statistical methods to address the needs of Biostatistical Inference.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT801

BIOSTAT803 Biostatistics in Cancer Seminar

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Taylor, Jeremy
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: The purpose of this class is to describe biostatistical research that is occuring in collaboration with cancer researchers, and to provide exposure to the field of cancer research. Activities inlcude seminars on statistical methods in cancer; presentations of cancer research; presentations of articles from statistical literature; discussion of cancer clinical tiral protocals and grant proposals; and visits to research laboratories. Students formally in the training program are expected to enroll in this course every semester. The course is open to students not participating in the training grant. It is open to both PhD and Masters students.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT803

BIOSTAT810 Approaches to the Responsible Practice of Biostatistics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course will cover a series of topics that encompass Responsible Conduct of Research and Scholarship (RCRS) as defined by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), as well as focus upon the written and oral communication skills necessary for effective collaboration with public health investigators.
  • Course Goals: (1)To cover the following topics of Responsible Conduct of Research and Scholarship (RCRS): a)Research and Academic Misconduct - Fraud and Financial g) Research and Scholarship in Society and in the Global Workplace (2)To help students develop oral and written communication skills necessary for interaction with non-quantitative audiences. (3)To help students develop oral and written communication skills necessary for interaction with quantitative audiences.
  • Competencies: Core Competencies:(a)Demonstrate effective written and oral skills for communicating with different audiences in the context of professional public health activities; (b)Articulate an achievable mission"" and vision; (c)Demonstrate team building" negotiation" and conflict-management skills; (d)Appreciate the importance of working collaboratively with diverse communities and constituencies (e.g." researchers practitioners agencies" and organizations). Biostatistics Competencies:(a)Describe the roles biostatistics serves in the discipline of public health;(b)Develop written and oral presentations based on statistical analyses for both public health professionals and educated lay audiences;(c)Interpret results of statistical analyses found in public health studies.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT810

BIOSTAT820 Readings in Biostatistics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Students assigned special topics for literature study under guidance of individual faculty members. May be elected more than once. Enrollment limited to biostatistics majors.

BIOSTAT830 Advanced Topics in Biostatistics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Little, Roderick Wang, Lu
  • Prerequisites: course/instructor dependent
  • Description: Advanced training in biostatistical methods primarily for doctoral students. Format will include lectures, readings, presentations and discussions in an area of special interest to students and faculty, such as stopping rules and interim analysis in clinical trials, conditional and unconditional inference and ancillarity, or nonparametric regression.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT830

BIOSTAT990 Dissertation/Pre-Candidacy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: (1-8 Full term, 1-4 Half term)
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted to status as a candidate.

BIOSTAT995 Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Admission to Doctoral Program(1-8 Full term, 1-4 Half term)
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student who has been admitted to status as a candidate.

EHS500 Principles of Environmental Health Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Neitzel, Richard
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course provides a broad overview of some of the most important and current challenges to human health from environmental and occupational risk factors while teaching the basic knowledge and multi-disciplinary skills used to assess, control, and prevent them. We will address specific threats, such as outdoor and indoor air pollution, toxic metals, pesticides, radiation and occupational stressors; analyze impacts on specific diseases and injuries, such as cardiovascular disease, asthma, cancer, musculoskeletal injuries and impaired child development;; and introduce emerging threats, such as the hormone-mimicing potential of plastic chemicals and the impact of global climate change on heat-related mortality and shifting patterns of infectious disease. Emphasis will also be given to understanding the worsening environmental health impacts of industrialization on developing countries, the effects of globalization, such as the growing movement of hazardous industries, products, and wastes across borders. and the rise of the environmental justice movement. The course fulfills the MPH core competency in environmental health and is also open to students in LSA and other UM graduate schools. A basic understanding (high school level) of human biology and chemistry is recommended.
  • Syllabus for EHS500

EHS510 Responsible Conduct in Research and Scholarship

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Batterman, Stuart
  • Description: Responsible Conduct in Research and Scholarship --- This course provides training in 8 modules: (1) Research and Academic Misconduct; (2) Intellectual Property; (3) Responsible Authorship and Publications; (4) Human Subject Research and IRBs; (5) Animal Use and Care; (6) Mentor/Mentee Relationships; (7) Conflict of interest; and (8) Research and Scholarship in Society and the Global Marketplace.
  • Course Goals: The course has two primary goals: 1. To provide MPH, MS, and PhD students, as well as postdoctoral fellows, in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences with comprehensive training in the responsible conduct of research and scholarship. 2. To fulfill the NIH and NSF mandates for individual and institutional grant holders to trainall personnel supported by these awards in RCRS practices.
  • Competencies: To understand and follow the highest standards of integrity and professional conduct in eight key areas: 1. Research and Academic Misconduct - Fraud, Fabrication, and Plagiarism 2. Intellectual Property - Data Storage and Ownership 3. Responsible Authorship and Publications - Peer Review 4. Human Subjects Research and IRBs 5. Animal Use and Care - Laboratory Safety and Responsibilities 6. Mentor/Mentee Relationships 7. Conflict of Interest - Personal, Professional, and Financial 8. Research and Scholarship in Society and in the Global Workplace
  • Learning Objectives: Responsible Conduct in Research and Scholarship --- This course provides training in 8 modules: (1) Research and Academic Misconduct; (2) Intellectual Property; (3) Responsible Authorship and Publications; (4) Human Subject Research and IRBs; (5) Animal Use and Care; (6) Mentor/Mentee Relationships; (7) Conflict of interest; and (8) Research and Scholarship in Society and the Global Marketplace.

EHS550 Introduction to Occupational and Environmental Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status or Senior Standing
  • Description: Discussion of the basic concepts of occupational and environmental hygiene; recognition and evaluation of chemical,physical and biological hazards; the human environment; control hierarchies, strategies and technologies; personal protection; criteria and standards; the international dimension; and ethical issues. The course provides basic underpinnings of the nature of theory and practice in occupational and environmental hygiene, and thus provides a structural framework for thinking about the field, identifying linkages between disciplines and specialties, and providing a platform for more advanced study in the individual areas listed. The course is offered as a three-credit course in both the regular term and in the OJ/OC format.

EHS570 Water Quality Management

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Xi, Chuanwu
  • Description: Principles of science and engineering used in the evaluation and control of water quality. Includes current legislation, types of pollution, sources and nature of pollution, introduction to water quality management practices, water supply and treatment, hydrologic concepts, effects of waste discharge on receiving waters, lake management, and water quality criteria and standards.

EHS572 Environmental Impact Assessment (NRE 514)

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Batterman, Stuart
  • Prerequisites: EHS 574, Grad Status
  • Description: A comprehensive framework for predicting and evaluating environmental impacts is presented. The course emphasizes the theory, application, integration and evaluation of models simulating transport and fate of contaminants in air, surface and ground water, and soil. Case studies and computer exercises demonstrate contemporary exposure and health risk assessment problems.
  • This course is cross-listed with NRE514 in the NRE department.
  • Syllabus for EHS572

EHS574 Environmental Chemistry

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Ault, Andrew
  • Prerequisites: General Chemistry (2 terms), additional courses in Organic Chemistry, Analytical, or Physical Chemistry are advised; Undergraduates may enroll with instructor consent.
  • Description: Environmental chemistry is the study of natural processes in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere, as well as how mankind alters these systems. Natural cycles in the environment, perturbations due to human activity, steps being taken to mitigate these effects, and the impacts on human health and climate will be covered.
  • This course is cross-listed with CHEM474, CHEM574.

EHS578 Practical Projects

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Practical Projects in the application of theory and principles of Environmental Health Sciences in public health settings. Course requirements include an approved practical work experience related to Environmental Health Sciences in consultation with a faculty advisor. May be elected more than once. Enrollment limited to Environmental Health Sciences majors with at least two full terms of prior registration.

EHS581 Principles of Radiological Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s):
  • Offered every other year
  • Last offered Fall 2016
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: Calculus
  • Description: Broad principles and practices of radiological health for environmental and occupational health generalists. Basic physics, measurement, control of radiation sources and bioeffects, risks, and control policies. Lectures and demonstrations.

EHS588 Environmental Law (SNRE 475)

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Introduces students to Environmental Law and the impact of the legal process on decisions that affect the environment. Topics include common law tort actions, toxic tort actions, statutory controls of pollution and other environmentally harmful activities. Additional areas include administrative agency structure and performance, Constitutional rights to environmental quality and more.

EHS601 Exposure Science and Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Meeker, John Dvonch, Tim
  • Description: This course will convey the basic concepts of occupational and environmental exposure science: the fundamental and practical aspects of assessing and controlling exposures to hazardous agents, broadly defined, encountered in occupational, residential, and ambient environments. The course is designed to provide the knowledge and skills necessary to assess exposure, and understand how upstream processes create risks for health. Major topics include: the regulatory landscape; prevention and sustainability (by design); recognition and evaluation of the various pathways and routes of exposure to chemical, physical, and biological hazards; air, water, soil, surface, food, and consumer product contamination; control hierarchies, strategies, and technologies, criteria, and standards; the international dimension; and ethical issues.

EHS602 Essentials of Toxicology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Colacino, Justin
  • Description: This course examines basic concepts of occupational and environmental toxicology, including uptake, distribution, metabolic conversion, and elimination of toxic agents, as well as the fundamental models used to describe the interaction of xenobiotic agents with biological systems. The course focuses on the application of these concepts to the assessment of exposures, estimates for risk of disease, establishment of appropriate limits on exposures and ambient levels of toxic materials/agents, and understanding and prevention of mortality and morbidity resulting from environmental exposure to toxic substances through a case study format.
  • Syllabus for EHS602

EHS604 Professional Perspectives in Environmental Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Jolliet, Olivier
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status, Completion of approved internship, research or practical experience
  • Description: This project-oriented course provides the student the opportunity to integrate academic principles, practical skills and concepts in environmental health as related to the broader scope of public health. Students will carry out a 2 credit hour applied group project, having to synthesize their acquired knowledge from different courses and subplans to address real world problems. Students will provide oral presentation (intermediary and final) and written reports on the conducted project. This culminating capstone course will be elected during the professional students last fall term in residence.
  • Course Goals: At the end of the course students are expected to be able to: G1) formulate an addressable problem from an ill-posed question; G2) propose plausible solutions to challenges in areas within and outside your expertise; G3) function effectively as a member of a multi-faceted team; G4) lead a diverse group of people in addressing new challenges; and G5) communicate effectively with colleagues.
  • Competencies: Students taking this class are expected on its completion to be able to: C1) formulate an addressable problem from an ill-posed question; C2) develop plausible solutions to challenges in areas within and outside their expertise; C3) function as an effective member of a multi-disciplinary and multi-expertise team; C4) demonstrate effective written and oral skills for communicating with different audiences in the context of professional public health activities; C5) demonstrate team building and conflict management skills; C6) apply evidence-based principles and the scientific knowledge base to critical evaluation and addressing of public health problems; C7) appreciate the importance of working collaboratively with diverse communities agencies and organizations.

EHS616 Introduction to Toxicological Pathology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Bergin, Ingrid
  • Prerequisites: Physiology and EHS 511 or equivalent.
  • Description: This course will provide and introduction to the histologic damage produced by chemical toxicants. A combination of lectures, student-led discussions and slide-reading sessions will be used to integrate concepts of toxicological mechanism, physiology and pathologic outcome. Emphasis will be place on molecular methods and mechanisms used for the diagnosis and investigative toxicological pathology. The pathology associated with chemicals that damage the major organ systems of humans and mammals will be discussed. During the two credit hours of didactic class presentations student will lead discussions on the pathologic effects of chemicals on cells, tissues and organs and the pathophysiologic outcome. This course is intended for advanced graduate students in the life sciences.

EHS622 Mechanisms of Developmental Toxicology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Harris, Craig
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status, Biochem 515 or equiv
  • Description: Integration and analysis of scientific information to enhance understanding and elucidate biochemical and molecular mechanisms in developmental toxicology. Course emphasis is on student discussions of the theoretical and practical aspects of embryology as related to biochemical, physiological and molecular mechanisms of embryotoxicity based on readings from the scientific literature.

EHS623 Mechanisms of Reproductive Toxicology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Loch Caruso, Rita
  • Last offered Fall 2016
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status, Biochemistry, Physiology
  • Description: Analysis and integration of scientific information to enhance understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms of reproductive toxicity. Emphasis is on student discussion of theoretical and practical aspects of mechanistic studies based on assigned reading from the scientific literature.

EHS640 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Ault, Andrew
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: Measuring concentrations of and changes to environmental pollutants in air, water, soil, and consumer products is central to understanding the impact of the environment on human health. This laboratory course will explore sampling methods and measurement techniques, which are important when considering different exposure to pollutants in the environment.
  • Course Goals: Students will gain hands-on experience with study design, laboratory measurements, monitoring equipment and sophisticated instrumentation. Students will sample both in the laboratory and the ambient environment as part of this experiential course to gain practical experience at environmental measurements.
  • Competencies: - Execute study design and planning for sampling in the ambient environment. - Conduct air and water sampling with a range of environmental monitoring equipment. - Carry out spatiotemporal analysis of pollutants over different spatial scales. - Be able to follow laboratory safety procedures and best safety practices relevant to an environmental workplace. - Be able to prepare of technical material regarding air, water, and consumer product sampling, through figure, tables, and written reports. - Be able to present and defend experimental data from environmental sampling to peers and instructor.
  • Learning Objectives: - Train students in hands-on operation of a range of methods and instrumentation used in air quality, water quality, and consumer products testing. - Teach students to develop sampling plans and approaches to study design. - Provide students practical experience with conducting research in a laboratory setting. - Explore the challenges and decisions that must be made when conducting ambient sampling, particularly in a restricted time window. - Gain experience transforming data from instrument outputs to presentable technical material.

EHS652 Evaluation of Chemical Hazards

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Zellers, Edward
  • Offered every year
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: Previous or concurrent enrollment in biostatistics course
  • Description: Concepts and techniques related to the evaluation of occupational exposures to gases, vapors, and aerosols. Emphasis on operating mechanisms and practical aspects of industrial hygiene air-monitoring equipment, characterizing exposure distributions, and developing sampling strategies. Lectures, laboratory exercises, demonstrations, problems, technical reports, and reading. Primarily for students in occupational health and safety.

EHS658 Physical Hazards

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Neitzel, Richard
  • Prerequisites: Graduate Standing or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Lectures, discussions, demonstrations on the health effects, measurements methods, regulations, and control technologies related to physical hazards, including temperature extremes, noise, vibration, lasers, non-ionizing radiation (rf, microwave, IR, visible, and UV), and ionizing radiation.
  • Syllabus for EHS658

EHS672 Life cycle assessment: Human health and environmental impacts

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Jolliet, Olivier
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This 3-hour course describes how consumption and products affect environmental risks and impacts on human health and on ecosystems. Based on a life cycle approach, this course will first provide an overview of the impacts generated by consumers and by the students themselves. How to carry out Life Cycle Assessment (LCA ) of products and services will then be presented. For the Life Cycle Impact Assessment phase, a special focus will be given to the characterization of comparative risks of toxics substances on human health and ecosystems. This leads to discussion of the potentials and limitations of LCA compared to other assessment tools such as risk assessment and environmental impact assessment. Practical case studies will be taken from multiple consumption domains, from agriculture and food production up to electronic services.
  • Syllabus for EHS672

EHS688 Professional Development in Environmental Health Sciences I

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 0.5 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Ault, Andrew
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course is designed to introduce students to the Department of Environmental Health Sciences, resources available in School of Public Health and the broader University of Michigan environment, to prepare students for their internship experience, and to introduce students to different types of careers in environmental health.

EHS689 Professional Development in Environmental Health Sciences II

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 0.5 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Ault, Andrew
  • Prerequisites: Second year EHS MPH student
  • Description: This course is designed to connect training in EHS with the practical and complex challenges associated with working in professional organizations. As the second professional development course of the EHS Master of Public Health program, EHS 689 concludes and integrates the summer field experience with academic concepts.
  • Course Goals: The overall objective is to prepare students for a career in EHS, and to foster professional development. To achieve this goal, students taking this class are expected to learn about the following: -To enhance student skills in synthesizing, translating, and communicating environmental health-related information, data, and experiences -To provide students with the opportunity to learn from and interact with EHS professionals across the subdisciplines in EHS -To familiarize students with career resources that are available in EHS, the School of Public Health, and the University of Michigan -To prepare students to successfully obtain an EHS position upon graduation
  • Competencies: The overall expectation is that students will be able to use the knowledge and skills gained in this course to prepare for an EHS career in a multidisciplinary setting, and to integrate knowledge, skills, and abilities gained through academic coursework with practical, hands-on experience gained through the field experience. Specifically, students who complete this class are expected to be able to do the following: -Demonstrate effective written and oral skills for communicating with different audiences in the context of professional public health activities -Apply evidence-based principles and the scientific knowledge base to critical evaluation and decision-making in public health

EHS690 Practice in Global Environmental Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Xi, Chuanwu Dvonch, Tim
  • Prerequisites: Instructor Approval
  • Description: The course will be divided into three sections: Section 1, Introduction of a variety aspects of internships in global environmental health; Section 2, working with individual faculty (advisor) to select an international project and prepare funding applications; and Section 3; present the proposed project in class.

EHS697 Readings

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr
  • Description: Supervised study/review of a selected topic in environmental health, occupational health, nutrition and/or toxicology. May be elected more than once for a maximum of six credits.

EHS698 Research

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Original research investigation of a special topic in environmental health, occupational health, nutrition and/or toxicology. May be elected more than once for a maximum of six credits.

EHS699 Master's Thesis

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm of Thesis Advisor
  • Description: This course shall be elected by students enrolled in Master's degree programs that require a formal written thesis as a condition of program completion. The thesis shall be defended in front of the student's thesis committee. The course grade will reflect the student's accomplishments relative to the thesis and its defense. The course is to be elected only once.

EHS717 Toxicological Pathology Laboratory

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: EHS 616 or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: This laboratory course will provide an introduction to the histopathology associated with chemical exposures. Students will perform routine histological maneuvers on tissues from rats treated with “unknown” chemicals. Following microscopic inspection of tissues, students will describe the pathological process produced in each tissue and will identify the class of (or specific) chemical to which the organism was exposed.

EHS757 Occupational Health Aspects of Industrial Processes

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Schiller, Bert
  • Prerequisites: EHS 550 or equiv and Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Observation and discussion of selected industrial processes, potential hazards, and controls. Potential hazards include chemical, physical, biological, and ergonomic. Emphasis on application and integration of different aspects of occupational health management. Field trips to various industrial plants. Guest lectures and student-lead discussions. Intended for second-year Industrial Hygiene and Occupational Medicine students.

EHS796 Special Topics in Environmental Health Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Lecture, seminars and readings selected on a current or emerging topic or theme in the environmental health sciences. The specific material and format will vary by semester and instructor.

EHS801 Research and Communication in the Environmental Health Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Dolinoy, Dana
  • Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
  • Description: 'Research and Communication in the Environmental Health Sciences' is an upper graduate-level course designed for Doctoral Students. Other students and post-doctoral fellows/auditors are welcome, if space allows. The course will cover research and communication skills essential to graduate school success and a professional career in the environmental health sciences. EHS 801 will consist of lectures, discussion sessions, journal clubs, homework assignments, group activities, and several presentations. Guest lecturers will include Departmental Faculty and University communication specialists. Students will be strongly encouraged to integrate their own dissertation aims into all aspects of the seminar.

EHS869 Doctoral Seminar in Occupational and Environmental Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Loch Caruso, Rita
  • Prerequisites: EHS Doctoral Student Status
  • Description: Integrative discussions of dissertation research projects, presentation of research findings, in-depth literature reviews/critiques, and manuscript reviews in occupational and environmental health.

EHS899 Advanced Research

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Original investigations of a specific topic in environmental health, occupational health, nutrition and/or toxicology. Designed for doctoral students performing research prior to passing their qualifying exam. May be elected more than once.

EHS990 Dissertation/Pre-Candidacy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to status as candidate.

EHS995 Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students who have been admitted to status as candidate.

EPID299 Independent Research for Undergraduates

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Students do an independent microbiology research project under the supervision of afaculty member in the Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology program.
  • Course Goals: To teach students how to carry out scientific research in microbiology.
  • Competencies: Students are judged in how well they carry out their research projects, the effort they put into the process, and their grasp of the larger research goals.
  • Learning Objectives: Students learn both specific laboratory techniques and in general how to carryout independent research.

EPID399 Independent Research for Undergraduates

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr. and at least Junior status
  • Description: Students do an independent microbiology research project under the supervision of a faculty member in the Hospital & Molecular Epidemiology program.

EPID504 Polymicrobial Communities Laboratory

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Rickard, Alex
  • Last offered Fall 2017
  • Prerequisites: Permission of the Instructor
  • Description: This laboratory course provides an opportunity for students to become familiar with approaches and techniques to studying microbial diversity. Techniques to describe microbial diversity at the structural, behavioral, and ecosystem level will be addressed. Emphasis will be placed on approaches to understand diversity within the human microbiome and environmental systems as well as the interactions between them.
  • Course Goals: The course has three main goals: (1) Familiarize students with techniques to study the microbial diversity of the human body as well as the diversity of specific environmental systems that interact with the human body. These include drinking water biofilms and microorganisms in food. Research techniques that will be studied include culturing and sampling techniques, genetic approaches (e.g. cloning, 16S rRNA gene sequencing), microscopy and imaging as well as use of model systems such as Robbins devices and flow cells. (2) Introduce the concept of functional microbiomics, and describe and perform laboratory techniques to investigate microbial diversity. Approaches to discover and interrogate cell-cell interactions between microorganisms will be introduced. (3) Support students in the development of a model system or project in order to perform a discovery-based or hypothesis-based study of the microbial composition of an polymicrobial environmental sample.
  • Competencies: 2.A. Biological Variability Knowledge 1. The nature and complexity of inter-individual variability (biological, biochemical, and physiological) as it affects the study of a disease process. 2. D. Human Physiology and Pathology Knowledge 1. The biochemical and cellular basis for normal and pathological functioning 2. Interaction among anatomical systems and organs in health and disease. 3. The most important chronic, infectious, and degenerative diseases of humans in terms of the public's health 4. Pathobiology of major diseases integrated with the principles of epidemiology. 5. The impact of host characteristics (e.g., immune response, nutrition, presence of other diseases or infections) on disease outcomes
  • Learning Objectives: Three learning objectives include: (1) Learn and perform laboratory techniques to describe microbial diversity as well approaches to analyze the results of experiments. (2) Realize the impact microbes on the environment as well as on the human microbiome and understand how these communities may interact with one-another. (3) Participate in a scientifically-based class debates and contribute towards the formulation of laboratory experiments.
  • This course is cross-listed with Pilot course so not yet cross-listed but upper-level undergraduate students and graduate students from other departments will be considered. in the Pilot course so not yet cross-listed but upper-level undergraduate students and graduate students from other departments will be considered. department.

EPID505 Polymicrobial Communities in Human Health and Disease

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Rickard, Alex
  • Last offered Fall 2014
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: Regions of focus for the study of the human microbiome (image taken from http://nihroadmap.nih.gov/hmp/ ) This course provides an opportunity for students to become familiar with the concept that humans contain more than just an organized assemblage of mammalian cells. In addition to our human cells, there are numerous microbial inhabitants- many are bacteria. Indeed, on a per-cell basis, these bacteria outnumber human cells by at least an order of magnitude. How resident bacteria interact with one another and with transient (often pathogenic) bacterial species is important to understand because these interactions can promote health or potentially aid the transition towards disease. One such example of these interactive polymicrobial communities can be found in dental plaque, where 400 species of bacteria can cohabitate, and their physical and chemical interactions play a role in the colonization of pathogenic species. In this case, disease can be manifested as periodontitis. Other examples of microbial communities of the body that will be studied in this course include skin/wounds, the upper-respiratory tract, the gut and the urogenital tract. Overall, this course will describe the microbial ecology of the human body and driving forces promoting the transition from those communities associated with health to disease-causing communities. Special emphasis will be given to cutting-edge laboratory techniques when exploring the microbial ecology of the human body. This course will culminate with a broad overview of the current understanding of the human microbiome and potential associated social ramifications of future research.
  • Course Goals: The course has three main goals: (1) Familiarize students with the microbial ecology of the human body and highlight the recent National Institutes of Health strategic initiative that focused on the human microbiome (http://nihroadmap.nih.gov/hmp/). Special focus will be given to particular regions of the human body, including the oral cavity, respiratory tract, gut, urogenital tract and skin. (2) Introduce the concept of functional microbiomics and describe laboratory techniques to investigate the microbial diversity of regions of the body. Furthermore, approaches to discover and interrogate cell-cell interactions between resident and pathogenic species will be introduced. Research techniques that will be studied include classic genetic approaches (e.g. 16S rRNA gene sequencing), more complex genetic techniques (e.g. denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and metagenomic sequencing) and approaches to image in-vivo and in-vitro multi-species communities (e.g. electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy). (3) Support students in the development of a discovery-based or hypothesis-based study of the microbial composition of a particular region of the human body. This will be presented in the form of an original research proposal that will incorporate current findings from other human microbiome research and will use these findings to study the given region of the body in health and disease.
  • Competencies: 2. D. Human Physiology and Pathology Knowledge 1.The biochemical and cellular basis for normal and pathological functioning 2.Interaction among anatomical systems and organs in health and disease. 3.The most important chronic, infectious, and degenerative diseases of humans in terms of the public's health 4.Pathobiology of major diseases integrated with the principles of epidemiology. 5.The impact of host characteristics (e.g., immune response, nutrition, presence of other diseases or infections) on disease outcomes
  • Learning Objectives: Four learning objectives include: (1) Learn about the complexity of the human microbiome and techniques that are available to study the ecology of human-associated microbial communities. (2) Realize the impact of the microbial inhabitants of humans on health and disease and be able to describe microbial factors that promote the transition towards diseased states. (3) Participate in a scientifically-founded class debate: Addressing the legal, ethical and social ramifications raised by research into the human microbiome. (4) Understand cutting-edge research and review articles discussing results of investigations of the human microbiome. Furthermore, each student will use these articles to develop a paper which outlines a plan to study the ecology of host-associated microbial communities in health and/or disease.

EPID506 Health of Nations: Introduction to International Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Lee, Gwenyth
  • Offered every year
  • Last offered Fall 2017
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Description: This course presents an overview of mortality and disease occurrence in terms of geographic, cultural, nutritional and environmental factors. Reviews health indicators such as infant mortality and economic factors associated with development. Discusses health problems of developing countries and describes programs and organizations involved in addressing them. This course is required for students in the International Health track in Epidemiology but can also be taken by non International Health students.
  • Syllabus for EPID506

EPID511 Introduction to Public Health Genetics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Marrs, Carl F
  • Last offered Fall 2017
  • Prerequisites: Grad status or perm instructor
  • Description: This course is designed for those interested in a basic understanding of human genetics who have had only a very limited exposure to biologic sciences. This course will cover the basics of genetics at both the molecular and population level. In addition to the basic science, some ethical, legal, and social implications of genetics research will be examined. Examples relevant to public health will be emphasized.
  • Course Goals: The goal of this course is to teach the basics of genetics so that students who successfully complete the course will be qualified to take Epid 515 and some of the other courses associated with the Certificate in Public Health Genetics.
  • Competencies: This course serves as the introductory course in public health genetics for students who have not yet taken an undergraduate level genetics course. By the end of the course students should have a firm basic understanding of the legal and social issues associated with human genetics.
  • This course is cross-listed with in the PUBHLTH 311 department.
  • Syllabus for EPID511

EPID512 BIOLOGIC BASIS OF DISEASE

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Bakulski, Kelly
  • Last offered Fall 2017
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course will examine the major pathological processes of interest to practitioners of Public Health. Specifically, the physiological mechanisms of disease will be examined with a view to understanding the cellular, biochemical and molecular processes that underlie diseases of major public health impact.

EPID514 Social Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Needham, Belinda
  • Last offered Fall 2015
  • Prerequisites: EPID 503 (or equiv), Biostat 503 (or equiv)
  • Description: Considers the uses of epidemiology with emphasis on the social determinants of chronic diseases and premature mortality. Theoretical as well as methodological issues in conducting social epidemiology research are emphasized. Designed for graduate students who have prior familiarity with the basic principles and methods of epidemiologic research.

EPID515 Genetics in Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Smith, Jennifer
  • Last offered Fall 2017
  • Description: This course is designed for students with biology or genetics background, that are interested in understanding genetics in public health. This course will provide an in depth examination of genetics in public health including newborn screening diseases and practices, fundamentals of population genetics, and the genetics of common chronic diseases.

EPID530 Scientific Communication for Epidemiologists

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): August, Ella
  • Last offered Fall 2017
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: Students will learn the structure, conventions, and styles associated with selected communication formats, appropriate for scientific discourse in public health. During the course, students will produce a scientific poster with a "conference-style" abstract, develop and present an oral presentation and explore one practice-oriented writing format in depth.

EPID543 Epidemiology of Viral Diseases

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Martin, Emily
  • Last offered Winter 2018
  • Prerequisites: Graduate Standing or BIO 207 & BIO 305
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: The nature of viruses including replication, transmission, pathogenesis, pathology, antigenic relationships and preventive measures
  • Syllabus for EPID543

EPID546 Advanced Virology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 2-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: EPID 543 and EPID 545
  • Description: Advanced laboratory studies of viruses and virus diseases with emphasis upon the application of procedures to investigation. May be elected more than once.

EPID560 Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenesis

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Marrs, Carl F
  • Offered every year
  • Last offered Fall 2015
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status and Intro Microbiology and Biochemistry or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Microbial structures and their relation to basic mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis; structure, function, and genetics of bacterial toxins; and host resistance and immunity. Discussions of pathogenic organisms of major public health importance, diseases caused, and their epidemiology.
  • Course Goals: The goals of this course are to have the students gain a basic understanding of the kinds of virulence factors used by pathogenic bacteria to cause disease.
  • Competencies: With this course students should fulfill the following Hospital & Molecular Epidemiology Program Competencies (1-6): (3) General understanding of the principles of infectious diseases microbiology molecular biology and genetics; (4) In depth knowledge in at least one of the following: microbiology molecular biology genetics or infection control.
  • Syllabus for EPID560

EPID562 Advanced Bacteriology Laboratory

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 2-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: EPID 560 and EPID 561 or Perm. Instr.I
  • Description: Individual laboratory studies of selected topics on bacteria of public health importance. May be elected more than once.

EPID565 Research in Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Offered every year
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Investigation of a selected problem planned and carried out by each student. Pertinent literature, investigational approaches, and progress in the investigations are discussed in seminars. May be taken more than once for up to six credits. Usually taken first for one credit. This is the Capstone Course for Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology Students.

EPID578 Practical Projects in Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Fall 2016
  • Description: A period of elective (i.e., non-required) practical projects for international students in Epidemiology. Students work for at least eight weeks in an approved agency. Course requirements include this approved practical work experience related to the student's field of study plus prior and concurrent consultation with the student's faculty advisor. Restricted to Epidemiology majors with at least two full consecutive terms of enrollment.

EPID600 Introduction to Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Villamor, Eduardo
  • Last offered Fall 2015
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 503, 553 or another graduate course in basic statistics, which may be taken concurrently with EPID 600
  • Description: This course provides students with the foundations of epidemiologic theory and practice. The course will cover conceptual and practical issues around the design, conduct, and analysis of epidemiologic research and the interpretation of epidemiologic data. The course format includes lectures and discussions of written exercises.

EPID601 Principles and Methods of Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Gordon, Aubree
  • Offered every year
  • Last offered Fall 2015
  • Prerequisites: Previous or concurrent enrollment in Biostat 523 or equiv; Epid 600 or 503 is recommended but not required
  • Description: Epid 601 is a comprehensive course in the basic concepts, principles, and methods of population-based epidemiologic research, which serves as a foundation for subsequent courses in epidemiology, biomedical research, and quantitative methods. Class topics expand on those covered in Epid 600. Emphasis is given to study design, quantitative measures, statistical analysis, data quality, sources of bias, and causal inference. The general approach of this course is both theoretical and quantitative, focusing on the investigation of disease etiology and other causal relations in public health and medicine.
  • Syllabus for EPID601

EPID603 Professional Development Seminar

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Pearce, C. Leigh
  • Description: EPID 603 is a two-semester seminar course to be taken by OEE, GE, and GHE students in the fall and winter semesters in year one. Students are exposed to various topics such as self-assessment, professional communication, responsible research, and career planning.

EPID604 Applications of Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
  • Description: Application of epidemiological methods and concepts to analysis of data from epidemiological, clinical or laboratory studies. Introduction to independent research and scientific writing under faculty guidance.
  • Syllabus for EPID604

EPID605 Infectious Disease Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Wilson, Mark L
  • Offered every year
  • Last offered Fall 2016
  • Prerequisites: EPID 503 or EPID 600
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: Introduction to disease and transmission characteristics, and the descriptive epidemiology of infectious agents. This course will help students to understand the theoretical basis of pathogen transmission and what factors determine patterns of disease occurrence. Students will learn how to apply this understanding to disease prevention and control.
  • Syllabus for EPID605

EPID618 Global Social Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Fleischer, Nancy
  • Description: Social epidemiology course with a focus on global population and health trends, health equity, and the social determinants of health in a global context.
  • Course Goals: The goal of the course is to provide students with an introduction to social determinants of health in the global context. We will focus on (1) global population trends, (2) drivers of changes in health in low- and middle-income countries, and (3) key social determinants that contribute to global health inequity.
  • Competencies: (1) Identify and describe population patterns of health-related risk factors and health-related outcomes in terms of person, place, and time. (2) Be familiar with the current major public health issues and be able to identify and evaluate the determinants of these public health issues (e.g., demographic, pathophysiologic, genetic, environmental, infectious, behavioral, and social). (3) Be exposed to published epidemiologic studies and be able to critically appraise epidemiologic findings.

EPID624 Readings in Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Review of literature on selected subjects under guidance of individual faculty members and through scheduled seminars at which reports are presented. May be elected more than once.

EPID630 Topics in Environmental Determinants of Infectious Diseases

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Eisenberg, Joseph
  • Last offered Fall 2015
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600 or EPID 503
  • Description: This course will focus on environmental determinants of infectious disease, examining the literature that addresses different environmental perturbations ranging from land use and climate change to urbanization and social changes. Students will learn about the natural history of infectious diseases and the different analytic methods used to study such systems.

EPID633 Introduction to Mathematical Modeling in Epidemiology and Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Eisenberg, Marisa
  • Last offered Fall 20158
  • Description: This course serves as a basic introduction to math modeling in epidemiology, with examples drawn broadly from infectious disease, chronic disease, and social epidemiology. The goal of this course is to give students basic familiarity with a wide range of topics and methods in mathematical modeling for epidemiology.

EPID640 SAS for Epidemiological Research

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Adar, Sara
  • Last offered Fall 2015
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 503 or 553
  • Description: This course teaches the fundamentals of data management, processing, manipulation, and critical review of data in SAS for epidemiologic and statistical analysis.
  • Course Goals: As a hands-on class, this course aims to teach the basics of SAS in addition to sharpening student's intuition about how to use, manipulate, review, interpret, and judge others' claims about data.
  • Competencies: 3.H. Computer Packages in Data Analysis Skill 1.Use of computer packages for data entry and data analysis, to include spreadsheets, SAS, SPSS, STATA, and Epi Info. 3.J. Data Management Knowledge 1.Different types of data (qualitative and quantitative), the scale used to measure the data (nominal, ordinal, interval, and ratio scales), and how the scale used relates to data coding, data entry, and generating a codebook. 2.Standard practices for data coding, data entry, generating codebooks for an epidemiological dataset, data verification, cleaning, and editing.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of this course, students should be able to read in raw data, merge files, recode existing variables, create new parameters, critically review data for errors, create graphics to understand data, construct datasets for statistical analysis, and interpret simple statistical output in SAS.

EPID643 Surveillance and Publicly Available Datasets

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mondul, Alison
  • Last offered Fall 2015
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600
  • Description: This course includes an introduction to publicly available datasets and their use in epidemiologic research. Students will be introduced to datasets and will do in-class exercises using these data. This course consists of lectures, in-class exercises, quizzes, and a final written assignment.
  • Course Goals: The goal of this course is to learn about what datasets are publicly available as well as how to access them and conduct analyses using them.
  • Competencies: After completing this class, students are expected to be able to attain the following Epidemiology Department MPH competencies: -Be familiar with basic aspects of field methods in epidemiology (e.g. human subject protection, data collection and management, survey design, sampling strategies, calculating power, and public health surveillance). -Calculate and interpret measures of event frequency (e.g. prevalence, incidence) an measures of association (e.g. odds ratio, relative risk, attributable risk) and be able to articulate the uses and limitations of these measures. -Understand and be able to apply analytical approaches to data from different epidemiologic study designs (e.g. cross-sectional, cohort, randomized studies). -Demonstrate effective communication of epidemiologic findings in written and oral formats.

EPID644 Contemporary Methods

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Needham, Belinda
  • Last offered Fall 2015
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600
  • Description: Overview of contemporary methodologic topics in epidemiology
  • Course Goals: The goal of this course is to provide an introduction to contemporary methods in epidemiologic research. We will discuss conceptual and empirical work on directed acyclic graphs, mediation and effect modification, meta-analysis, systems-based approaches, gene-environment interactions, multi-level modeling, and inverse-probability weighting for selection bias.
  • Competencies: This course will address the following Department of Epidemiology MPH core competencies (List 1-10): 6. Be familiar with the the basic tools of causal inference in epidemiology (e.g. counterfactuals, directed acyclic graphs, fundamental of systems approaches). 7. Understand epidemiologic concepts of causal inference including bias, confounding and effect modification, and be able to apply study design and analytical approaches to minimize, assess or account for them in epidemiologic studies. 9. Demonstrate effective communication of epidemiologic findings in written and oral formats. 10. Be exposed to published epidemiologic studies and be able to critically appraise epidemiological findings.

EPID651 Epidemiology and Public Health Management of Disasters

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2013
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Description: Introduction to the evolving role of public health and epidemiology in disaster preparedness and response. It uses epidemiological principles to develop skills relevant to disaster preparedness, planning and relief/recovery efforts. Students acquire skills to assess risk and evaluate impacts after disasters, and work on a local health department preparedness project.

EPID663 Health, Evidence, and Human Rights

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Harlow, Sioban
  • Last offered Fall 2015
  • Prerequisites: Graduate Standing
  • Description: The ability to generate and interpret evidence is critical to addressing human rights abuses both in the courts and through national and multilateral policies. This course will use case studies to examine how to frame population research priorities and designs from a human rights perspective.

EPID673 Epidemiology of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Villamor, Eduardo
  • Last offered Fall 2015
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 503 or 553 or equivalent; and EPID 503 or EPID 600 or equivalent
  • Description: This course will survey both classic and emerging literature describing the DOHaD paradigm from an epidemiological perspective. The course will have a structured discussion format.
  • This course is cross-listed with EHS673.

EPID677 Epidemiology of Aging

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mendes de Leon, Carlos
  • Last offered Fall 2015
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course will address the epidemiology of aging from a public health perspective covering epidemiologic studies of disease, functional status, and well-being in late-life. The course is taught in seminar format, with in-class discussion of selected readings. Course evaluations will be based on class participation and a term paper.
  • Syllabus for EPID677

EPID681 Hospital Epidemiolgy II

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Chenoweth, Carol
  • Last offered Fall 2015
  • Prerequisites: EPID680
  • Description: This course will provide skill in use of surveillance techniques for HAIs, concepts of asepsis, disinfection and sterilization evaluation. Students will have opportunities to work through real-life experiences in infection control, including communicable disease exposures, outbreak investigation, biodisaster exercises, risk assessment in the healthcare setting and infections in special populations.
  • Course Goals: Course Goals: 1. Expose students to knowledge necessary to work in healthcare infection prevention and control. 2. Allow students to develop marketable skills essential to infection preventionists.
  • Competencies: By the completion of the course the student will have: 1. Understanding of the modes of transmission, risk factors, and appropriate interventions for prevention of HAIs 2. Knowledge of principles of effective hand hygiene, isolation systems, barrier control programs 3. Knowledge of surveillance systems used in hospitals and ability to use surveillance definitions to identify HAIs 4. Ability to analyze surveillance data to develop infection rates, identify clusters and work through an outbreak investigation 5. Understanding of role of aseptic technique, cleaning, disinfection and sterilization and ability to assess the adequacy of these procedures 6. Knowledge of how HAIs may present differently in specialized patient populations.

EPID811 Critical Appraisal of Epidemiologic Studies

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Lisabeth, Lynda Pearce, C. Leigh
  • Prerequisites: Doctoral standing or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: This is an introductory course for doctoral students in the epidemiology Ph.D. program. It will proved a unifying examination of epidemiological constructs and their application to the evaluation of the literature. Topics include: Importance of causal relationships; study designs that can demonstrate and test causation; interpretation of results from causation.

EPID813 Advanced seminar on public health and aging

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mendes de Leon, Carlos
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Doctoral standing at UM with training in research methods and statistics in relevant disciplines.
  • Description: This course provides advanced training in aging research pertaining to the public health and well-being of older adults. It will cover a variety of substantive and methodological areas in aging-related epidemiologic research and geriatrics. Selection of specific topics will in part depend on the interests of participating students.

EPID815 Modern Statistical Methods in Epidemiologic Studies

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Berrocal, Veronica Park, Sung Kyun
  • Last offered Fall 2015
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600, BIOSTAT 523 and BIOSTAT 560 for epid students. Biostat 650, 651 for biostat students
  • Description: The goal of this pilot course is to create an interdisciplinary educational experience for Ph.D. students in Epidemiology (also available as an optional elective for Masters students in Biostatistics) through a uniquely designed course that contains lectures on advanced biostatistical methods, but places them in the context of epidemiological applications.
  • Course Goals: Students enrolled in the class will learn about cutting edge statistical methods in these four contemporary topics that arise frequently in the present scientific context. These four topics are: (a) Modern techniques for model building and variable selection; (b) Methods for analyzing longitudinal data; (c) Spatial regression methods; (d) Methods for studies of interaction/effect modification. The course will equip the new generation epidemiologists with state-of-the-art statistical methods in these domains, and teach them the craft of translating a practical problem into mathematical equations. However, the entire theoretical learning process will be placed in the context of sophisticated modeling of data from large complex studies with a focused problem to solve. Data for the projects will come from two studies that Professors Park and Mendes de Leon are involved with: the Normative Aging Study (NAS) and the Chicago Health and Aging Project (CHAP).
  • Competencies: After completing this class, students are expected to be able to attain the following competencies: Core Competencies: -Describe preferred methodological alternatives to commonly used statistical methods when assumptions are not met. -Distinguish among the different measurement scales and the implications for selection of statistical methods to be used based on these distinctions. -Apply descriptive techniques commonly used to summarize public health data. -Apply common statistical methods for inference. -Apply descriptive and inferential methodologies according to the type of study design for answering a particular research question. -Interpret results of statistical analyses found in public health studies. Biostatistics Competencies: -Develop knowledge to communicate and collaborate effectively with scientists in a variety of health-related disciplines to which biostatistics are applied (e.g. public health, medicine, genetics, biology; psychology; economics; management and policy). -Become well-versed in the application of core statistical techniques (biostatistical inference, linear regression, generalized linear models, nonparametric statistical methods, linear mixed models) and 4-5 selected statistical specialization techniques. -Select appropriate techniques and apply them to the processing of data from health studies. -Interpret the results of statistical analysis and convert them into a language understandable to the broad statistical community. -Develop written and oral presentation skills and other scientific reporting skills, based on statistical analyses for public health, medical and basic scientists and educated lay audiences Epidemiology Competencies: -Employ state-of-the-art statistical and other quantitative methods in the analysis of epidemiologic data. -Demonstrate a thorough understanding of causal inference, sources of bias, and methods to improve the validity of epidemiologic studies. -Understand the principles and methods of data-collection and data-processing procedures in the design and conduct of epidemiologic research, with sound knowledge of measurement validity and reliability, data quality control, data management, documentation, and security
  • This course is cross-listed with BIOSTAT698.
  • Syllabus for EPID815

EPID816 Tuberculosis: Pathogen, Host and Environment

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Yang, Zhenhua
  • Offered every other year
  • Last offered Fall 2015
  • Prerequisites: EPID 605, 609 617 or any other infectious disease course.
  • Description: Tuberculosis remains one of the deadliest diseases in the world. Social and operational factors, the growing AIDS epidemic, and increasing drug resistance have dramatically compounded the tuberculosis crisis. This course will review the history, epidemiology, biology, pathogenesis, and clinical management of tuberculosis. It will examine the current issues related to tuberculosis and discuss the complex mechanisms that contribute to the almost unparalleled impact of tuberculosis on global health in the past and present time, including the impact of the emergence of AIDS epidemics. Each session will include a one-hour didactic presentation of the specific topic for the session by the instructor followed by a structured class discussion of reading(s) relevant to the session-specific topics that address emerging methods. In the last session, the students will be asked to present their research proposals on an infectious disease of their primary interests using the concepts and methods learned in this class. While the focus of the lectures will be centered on tuberculosis, the discussions will address the application of general concepts in infectious disease.

EPID822 Malaria and other important vector-borne diseases

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Wilson, Mark L
  • Offered every year
  • Last offered Fall 2016
  • Prerequisites: Epid 602, Epid 605 or equivalent; EHS 513 or equivalent
  • Description: Infectious agents transmitted by arthropod vectors produce an enormous disease burden worldwide, especially in underdeveloped countries. Malaria alone kills more than one million people each year, mostly children, and results in 42 million DALYs lost. This course is designed to investigate the epidemiology of malaria and other important vector-borne diseases that principally affect poor people living in tropical countries. The complex interactions influencing transmission dynamics, including immunologic, ecologic, economic and social factors are explored. Options for treatment, prevention and control involving vectors, parasites and human behavior are examined. Analysis also considers the role of other infections, including HIV, as altering transmission and disease. Class sessions will include a brief didactic presentation of the key issues for that topic followed by a structured discussion of selected readings.
  • Syllabus for EPID822

EPID889 Responsible Conduct of Research and Scholarship Seminar

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Pearce, C. Leigh Villamor, Eduardo
  • Last offered Fall 2016
  • Description: This seminar will cover the Responsible Conduct of Research and Scholarship (RCRS) training for all incoming EPID PhD students and other individuals who are affiliated with a training grant. The seminar will also expose students to cutting-edge epidemiologic research topics through departmental talks by experts in the field as well as provide additional professional development training. RCRS is defined by National Institutes of Health as "the practice of scientific investigation [and academia] with integrity. It involves the awareness and application of established professional norms and ethical principles in the performance of all activities related to scientific research [and academia]."

EPID890 Doctoral Seminar in Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Fleischer, Nancy
  • Description: Doctoral seminar to provide guidance to new doctoral candidates as they write their prospectus, and to provide opportunities to practice the presentation modalities of epidemiology through seminars, poster sessions, and oral presentations.

EPID891 Advanced Readings in Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Students will review assigned readings on the epidemiology or natural history of specific infections or chronic diseases or on host or environmental factors associated with disease, or on epidemiological methods and their application. May be elected more than once

EPID970 Pre-candidacy research in Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: Doctoral Student in Epidemiology Standing
  • Description: Original investigations in the various fields of Epidemiology as part of the student's preparation for their dissertation research and writing.

EPID990 Dissertation Research/Pre-Candidate

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Description: For students who have NOT reached candidacy yet.

EPID995 Dissertation Research/Candidate

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student who has been admitted to status as a candidate

HBEHED503 Introduction to Health Behavior Theory and Approaches

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Beck, Angela
  • Description: HBHE 503 provides an introduction to the psychosocial determinants of behavioral risk factors that affect health. We address these determinants within theories, models and frameworks of health-related behavior and explore the practical application of theory to public health practice. This is a hybrid course including online sessions and in-person meetings.

HBEHED530 Techniques of Survey Research

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Schulz, Amy
  • Prerequisites: Students should have completed at least one Biostatistics/Statistics course or will need permission of instructor
  • Description: Techniques of survey research are introduced including survey design, modes of data collection, sampling, questionnaire construction, maintaining data quality, pretesting techniques, ethical considerations, and management of survey study teams. This course focus on innovative data collection methods, skill-building interactive workshops and real world experiences from survey researchers in the field.

HBEHED540 Fundamentals of Reproductive Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Frank J.
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: Recommend prior human physiol course
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: The course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of reproductive health, in the USA and internationally. The course will introduce students to historical trends in the global burden of reproductive ill-health, the social ecology of reproductive risk, clinical health practice, and current controversies in policy and practice. Through a comparative look at reproductive health needs (e.g. maternal morbidity, contraceptive use, STI care and HIV-related services), in a range of diverse social settings, we will critically examine the logic and impact of current international standards for RH policy and practice.

HBEHED550 HIV/AIDS: Perspectives on the state of affairs, science and response to a global pandemic

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Amico, K. Rivet
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Description: About 35 million people are currently living with HIV, with 71% living in sub-Saharan Africa. For the first time, new treatments and strategies to prevent onward transmission have brought a vision of an "AIDS free generation". The influence of research, dissemination, policy and advocacy underlie US and International HIV/AIDS Strategies, which are uniformly adopting aggressive goals for eliminating new cases of HIV in the next decade. From the "cascade of HIV care" a new road map towards prevention and treatment has emerged and the role of individual health promotion, community engagement, health systems reforms, and policy are pivotal in achieving sustainable success in ending HIV. This course provides an overview of past, current and emerging issues in HIV-prevention, HIV testing, linkage and retention in HIV care, access to HIV treatment and achieving durable viral suppression in diverse domestic and global contexts from biological, social, structural, cultural and psychological perspectives. The course structure will generally follow a strategy of presentation from experts, advocates and affected individuals, targeted readings, lecture and discussion of a specific area on the prevention or treatment cascade, followed by lectures and activities that consolidate material presented and assigned for a given area. Most weeks have a planned combination of guest experts/speakers, readings, lecture, and activities that mobilize information into knowledge, ideas and insights.

HBEHED578 Practical Projects

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Practical projects in the application of theory and principles of Health Behavior and Health Education to individual and community-based public health settings. Course requirements include an approved practical project related to Health Behavior and Health Education in consultation with a faculty advisor. THE EXPERIENCE IS REPORTED IN AN INTEGRATIVE PAPER DEMONSTRATING THE SCIENTIFIC APPLICATION OF HBHE THEORIES AND PRINCIPLES TO THE PRACTICAL PROJECT. May be elected more than once. Enrollment limited to Health Behavior and Health Education majors with at least two full terms of prior registration.

HBEHED600 Psychosocial Factors in Health-Related Behavior

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Patel, Minal
  • Offered every year
  • Description: HBHE 600 provides an overview of the psychosocial determinants of behavioral risk factors that affect health. We address these determinants within theories, models, and frameworks of health-related behavior.

HBEHED601 Foundational Skills in HBHE

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Amico, K. Rivet
  • Prerequisites: HBHE MPH Student
  • Description: This course covers foundational skills needed to successfully complete the CEPH accredited HBHE MPH program. Knowledge and support regarding program requirements for core competencies, applied learning experience(s) and integrated learning experiences are provided, and students engage in the development of their e-portfolio throughout the semester.
  • Course Goals: This course is designed to: 1. Build a cohort community for support as professionals 2. Explore diverse professional and workplace skills. 3. Create plans for completing all MPH core competency requirements. 4. Create professional e-portfolio scaffolding and outline. 5. Demonstrate the ability to use fundamental public health practice skills developed through in-class group and dyadic activities. 6. Develop internship management, search, and planning strategies.
  • Competencies: While this course is not designed to assess specific competencies, we will work towards assisting students in integrating and showcasing fundamental core competencies.
  • Learning Objectives: Learning Objectives: Through participation in this course students will 1. Create the beginning structure for a comprehensive ePortfolio 2. Develop plans for future applied learning experiences and related products. 3. Gain skills in processes involved in summer internship placements (identifying placements, applying, exploring financial assistance options). 4. Engage with classmates in team building activities.

HBEHED608 Integrative Seminar on Healthy Cities

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: This course will fulfill the "Integrative Seminar" requirement for the Healthy Cities Graduate Certificate. The course combines public health, public policy, and built environment perspectives within one classroom. Classes are organized around guest speakers from various disciplines who will discuss the significance of interdisciplinary approaches to addressing urban health issues.
  • Course Goals: The integrative seminar is designed to combine perspectives from public health, public policy, and the built environment within a single classroom. Professionals working in these three fields have different ways of understanding the world, use different terminology to describe the phenomenon of interest, use different standards of evidence, and frame the scope of the problem in different ways. Students learn about these different approaches through the required coursework. Then, in the integrative seminar, the certificate students come together as a cohort to explore these differences and build cross-disciplinary understanding. To facilitate this process, class sessions are organized around a guest speaker series. Speakers from a variety of disciplines meet with the students to discuss the benefits and challenges of using interdisciplinary collaborations to address public health in urban contexts.
  • Competencies: ·Assess population needs, assets and capacities that affect communities' health. ·Advocate for political, social or economic policies and programs that will improve health in diverse populations.
  • Learning Objectives: ·Explain effects of environmental factors on a population's health. ·Explain the social, political and economic determinants of health and how they contribute to population health and health inequities.
  • This course is cross-listed with URP 612 002 in the Urban Planning department.

HBEHED610 Issues in Public Health Ethics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Roberts, Scott
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course will address a range of issues in public health ethics. The first part of the course will provide an introduction to key ethical frameworks and concepts relevant to public health, and it will describe the overlap and distinctions between public health and medical ethics. The remainder of the course will use a case-based approach to considering ethical dilemmas in several domains, including the following: 1) resource allocation and distributive justice; 2) questions of autonomy and paternalism; 3) health promotion & disease prevention; 4) clinical care; 5) research ethics; and 6) emerging issues in public health ethics. The course will use a blend of lectures and group discussions to consider topics of interest. Students will play an active role in researching, presenting, and writing up case studies that will be used to illustrate ethical concepts and conflicts and to facilitate class discussion.
  • Syllabus for HBEHED610

HBEHED620 Behavioral Research Methods in Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Zimmerman, Marc
  • Offered every year
  • Description: Principles of design of behavioral research on public health problems and programs. Objectives, philosophy, and methods of science including causal inference, the role of hypotheses, criteria for establishing adequate hypotheses, research designs and data collection techniques. Formulation of a research problem within a program setting.

HBEHED622 Program Evaluation in Health Education

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mistry, Ritesh
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 503 or equiv. and a course dealing with health education program development
  • Description: Examination and application, through a series of exercises, of several program evaluation models relevant for health education, including the goal attainment, goal-free, systems responsive, and decision-theoretic models, with emphasis on both process and impact analysis. Design options for measuring program effect, with the associated threats and external validity, are discussed, and several basic statistical techniques are reviewed and examined in terms of their applicability to program evaluation, including sampling and sample size determination for both surveys and experiments.

HBEHED625 Research in Health Behavior

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Inst.
  • Description: Individual work on a problem in the area of health behavior relevant to program effectiveness in public health, under the tutorial guidance of an appropriate staff member. Regular conferences are arranged to discuss research designs, proposed problem solutions, methods for data collection and analysis. The investigation is reported in a paper, which may be submitted for publication. May be elected more than once.

HBEHED628 Chronic Illness Interventions: Midlife to Older Adulthood

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Ramsay, Jessica
  • Prerequisites: Graduate standing
  • Description: This course examines chronic illness among middle aged to older adults, with a focus on self-management interventions. Students explore specific diseases, interventions, and facilitators and barriers to self-management. Key Intervention activities, e.g. health education, recruitment and fidelity are incorporated. The course involves discussion, in-class activities, written assignments and oral presentations.

HBEHED634 Child Health and Development

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Miller, Alison
  • Prerequisites: N/A
  • Description: Health outcomes for many children in the United States lag behind those of other developed countries. Moreover, significant socio-economic disparities exist in child morbidity and mortality. This course takes a developmental and social-contextual perspective on child health in the US, focusing on key concepts, current issues and intervention approaches.
  • Course Goals: Course Objectives: The course will increase student knowledge regarding health concerns for children across development and enhance critical thinking skills regarding influences on child health outcomes and intervention implications at different points in development. Specifically, the course will provide: 1) a survey of health concerns relevant for children from infancy through early adolescence (e.g., autism, obesity, depression); 2) mechanisms that shape child health outcomes (e.g., child factors, parenting and family processes, community resources; broader social contexts such as poverty); and 3) intervention approaches to promote child health. Opportunities to pursue topics of particular student interest within child health (e.g., global health, mental health) will also be available through assignments.
  • Competencies: The following HBHE Competencies are a primary focus of this course: #1. Describe the role and interaction of key determinants of health status from a social-ecological perspective (e.g. individual, family, organization, community, and society). The following HBHE Competencies are a secondary focus of this course: #2. Describe and apply relevant theories, concepts, and models from social and behavior science that are used in public health research and practice to both understand and affect health status, health behavior, social change, and policy. #6. Describe and apply the knowledge and skills necessary to interact with diverse individuals and communities within and across settings with varying levels of economic resources. #9. Understand, measure, and intervene to address health inequities.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of this course students will be able to: 1. Describe common child health concerns at different points in development 2. Articulate mechanisms and contextual factors that influence child health 3. Analyze how child developmental stage can affect intervention approach and effectiveness 4. Recommend developmentally-appropriate intervention strategies

HBEHED640 Community Organization for Health Education

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Israel, Barbara
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr. and Grad Status
  • Description: Examines social and structural factors associated with health and illness; concepts and theories regarding planned change and community; and models and principles of community organization practice for health education. Several models of community organization are analyzed along the dimensions of: community diagnosis needs assessment, selection and implementation of action strategies, evaluation research, role of the professional and ethical considerations.

HBEHED644 Readings in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Review of literature on selected topics in health behavior, health education or related areas under guidance of faculty member. Critical analysis; written and oral reports. May be taken more than once for a total not to exceed 6 credit hours.

HBEHED645 Urban Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mehdipanah, Roshanak
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course will introduce students to the foundations of how history, politics and structural determinants of health interact to crease urban health inequities in cities worldwide.
  • Course Goals: The goal of this course is to introduce students to the foundations of urban health including the various determinants and health-related factors and their interactions, that results in urban health inequities in cities worldwide.
  • Competencies: -Describe the impact of age, life course, gender, sexuality, ability, race, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, culture, and biology on health status, health behavior, and health behavior change. -Describe the role of structural and ecologic factors that influence health status, health behavior, and health behavior change. -Describe the role of policy, legal, and regulatory environments on health status, health behavior, and health behavior change. -Describe the political, environmental, economic, cultural, and psychological influences on health status, health behavior, and health behavior change within and across settings and countries with varying levels of economic resources. -Describe the social and environmental contributors to health inequities for different health problems and condition -Describe health-related inequities through qualitative and quantitative approaches.
  • Learning Objectives: -Learn the foundations of global urban health including some of the stakeholders involved in city wide decision-making. -Gain understanding on some of the concepts of urban health and determinants of health including the social and physical factors like housing, urban design, employment, transportation and so on. -Develop a research plan to study an urban health issue in a city within the US including the proposal of solutions and recommendations to address the issue. -Develop a health communication campaign to drive policy change to address a city-specific issue.

HBEHED662 Risk Communication: Theory, Techniques, and Applications in Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Zikmund-Fisher, Brian
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course will provide students with a theoretical and practical understanding of when and why people feel their health is "at risk." We focus on building students' ability to use evidence based techniques that can increase understanding and use of health data by patients, communities, the media, and policy makers.

HBEHED663 The Use of Brief Interventions to Help People Change Health Behaviors: Evidence-Based Strategies for Work in Clinical and Community Settings

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Piette, John
  • Prerequisites: N/A
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course gives students an understanding of how brief interventions are used to impact health behaviors and the approaches used to help people make and attain behavior-change goals. Students also gain skills in applying scientific evidence from randomized trials and systematic reviews in public health decision-making.
  • Course Goals: 1) Know what brief behavioral interventions are and how they are delivered to address behavioral challenges 2) Know where to look for evidence supporting the effectiveness of brief interventions 3) Be able to review, interpret, and apply evidence from randomized trials, systematic reviews, and guidelines 4) Understand what types of brief interventions have the strongest evidence and for whom they work
  • Competencies: a) Identify theories, concepts and models from a range of social and behavior science disciplines that are used in public health research and practice involving multiple levels of change (e.g., individual, family, organization, community, and society). b) Describe overlap between current models and frameworks, and their limitations c) Describe how theory is useful in understanding why individuals do or do not engage in health behaviors. d) Understand the merits of using theory to inform interventions and their evaluation in public health. e) Describe some of the benefits and challenges of using social and behavioral theories and models to inform programs and policies involving multiple levels of change (e.g. individual, family, organization, community). f)Describe key adaptations and challenges in applying theories and frameworks to conduct public health research and practice across cultures and in resource poor settings.

HBEHED668 Health Communications for Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Resnicow, Ken
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: HBHE 600
  • Description: From one-on-one health counseling to broad-based social marketing campaigns, a vast body of research over the past twenty years has demonstrated that numerous dimensions of health communications, including message format, receiver characteristics, and delivery channel can affect program impact. This course will address key considerations for constructing effective health communications including the application of behavior change theories and general marketing principles. Selected prior and current health promotion campaigns will be critically reviewed and students will be asked to develop a health communication intervention or social marketing campaign. Occasional guest lecturers, actively involved in development of health communication interventions will be integrated into the syllabus.

HBEHED698 Foundational Skills in the Practice of HBHE

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s):
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Description: This course covers foundational skills needed to prepare students for success in future professional public health contexts, including the internship. It begins conversations around cultural humility, group norms, and reflective practice. It will also develop students' skills in designing clear communications and group facilitation.

HBEHED699 Career Development and Capstone in Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Amico, K. Rivet
  • Description: HBHE 699 is required by students enrolled in the Master's program in HBHE. Students engage in a synthesis of knowledge formation in health behavior and health education. This course supports competency assessment and professional development with a special focus on career development and job placement.

HBEHED710 Special MPH Topics in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Master's level seminar designed to provide an extensive review of a number of substantive and methods and skill areas in health behavior and health education. Readings, discussion and assignments are organized around issues of mutual interest to faculty and students. Reviews and reports on topics required in the areas selected. May be elected more than once.

HBEHED800 Seminar in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Miller, Alison
  • Offered every year
  • Description: Advanced study of principles of health behavior, educational and motivational approaches to improve health, and research and evaluative issues in health behavior and health education. Includes discussion of behavioral science and health education applications to public health, with special topics selected by students for review and discussion. Designed for doctoral students in Health Behavior and Health Education. May be elected more than once.

HBEHED823 Structural Influences on Health and Social Behavior

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Geronimus, Arline T
  • Prerequisites: permission of instructor
  • Description: This doctoral seminar will draw on the public health and biomedical literature and also on constructs and literature from sociology, psychology, history, anthropology and demography to demonstrate how multi-disiciplinary theories and findings can be integrated to suggest a social-structural context for current public health problems. This structural understanding is designed to help HBHE doctoral students to reach candidacy with the ability to recognize the social patterning of health problems, and to discuss analytically the social structural influences, opportunities, and constraints affecting individual and social behavior, and, thereby, to develop research hypotheses and interventions or policies that take these into account. The course stresses the development of critical thinking skills, helps students recognize the social patterning of health problems, the historical influences on current health inequalities, and the ways that individual health knowledge and behavior can be reflexive, socially situated, and embedded within larger social, cultural, and historical contexts. The course also considers ways that structural forces may work through material, social psychological, and ultimately biological mechanisms to exert an impact on morbidity and mortality.
  • Course Goals: The goal of this course is to (1) ensure that all HBHE doctoral students are familiar with a structural perspective on health and social behavior; (2) to provide an in-depth example of how one would complete a structural analysis of a health problem; (3) to prepare students to address questions in the HBHE prelim that will call on them to draw on understanding of structural perspectives, including enhancing their conceptual models with structural elements; and (4) to provide students an opportunity to elaborate a detailed structural perspective on a public health problem of interest to them.
  • Competencies: Students will gain competency in: (1) critiquing existing public health literature from a structural perspective; (2) drawing on interdisciplinary literature to develop conceptual models that incorporate structural dimensions; (3) developing research hypotheses to test theories informed by a structural perspective; (4) developing research designs to test such hypotheses, using mixed-methods as appropriate; (5) interpreting study findings in light of structural understandings; (6) presenting research ideas that elaborate a structural perspective; and (7) employing structural perspectives in understanding why some interventions and policies are unsuccessful either in being implemented or in ameliorating specific public heath problems, and what are likely to be more promising approaches. In addition to providing skills for students who are interested in focusing on structural analysis in their future work, the course should provide students more interested in other HBHE approaches a basic fluency in structural analysis that will enable fruitful collaborations between doctoral students emphasizing different approaches. Students will also gain experience in presenting and defending their research and ideas in a seminar setting.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of the term, students should be able to : (1) explain what a structural perspective is and how a structural analysis differs from simply entering sociodemographic or economic variables into statistical models; (2) understand the importance of history, culture, pervasive ideology, social stratification, and institutionalization to current public health problems and proposed solutions; (3) be attuned to the social patterning of public health problems and their implications; (4) understand how structural dimensions of public health problems influence individual and social behavior;

HBEHED900 Research in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 2-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Research work undertaken by doctoral students in collaboration with faculty advisers, including participation in on-going departmental research activities. Open only to doctoral students in Health Behavior and Health Education. May be elected more than once.

HBEHED990 Dissertation/Pre-Candidate

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Half Term (IIIA or IIIB, 1-4 credits) Election for dissertation work by doctoral students in Health Behavior and Health Education who are not yet admitted to status as a candidate.

HBEHED995 Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Half Term (IIIA or IIIB, 1-4 credits) Election for dissertation work by doctoral students admitted to status as candidate.

HMP517 Issues in Public Health Genetics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Citrin, Toby Modell, Stephen
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: EPID 515 or Perm Instr
  • Description: This course focuses on ethical, legal, and social issues and analysis arising from the increasing application of genetic technologies to the health of individuals and populations. The four course segments cover the technical and social background of population-based genetic interventions, decision making criteria used in assessing the feasibility of proposed genetic screening programs and gene therapy trials, policy frameworks, such as cost-effectiveness analysis and ethical reasoning, which can aid in the selection and design of genetic programs and policies, and the deliberative processes decision making bodies can use in resolving differing interests as policy is developed and adopted. Each segment involves didactic presentations and class exercises in which students will grapple with current and anticipated publicized dilemmas. The segments collectively are linked by examples common to each portion of the course.
  • Syllabus for HMP517

HMP600 The Health Services System I

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Anthony, Denise Dotson, Ebbin
  • Prerequisites: Enrollment in HMP or Perm Instr
  • Description: First part of two-course sequence focusing on major issues in the organization of a health services system: role of values; assessment of health status; analysis of need, access and use of services; current supply and distribution of health resources; analysis of health care costs and expenditures. Students enrolling in HMP 600 are expected to also complete HMP 601.
  • Syllabus for HMP600

HMP604 Organization and Management of Health Advocacy and Community-Based Non-profits

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: HMP Graduate Standing or PI
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course is one of two HMP courses that fulfills the organization theory/management degree requirement. These courses provide knowledge of the theories of organizations, the use of leadership, management processes, and organizational structures and outcomes. Specific topics include governance, strategic management and marketing, human resources management, and process improvement. Nonprofit advocacy and community-based organizations face unique challenges related to their mission and ownership, including a greater need to motivate employees through culture and to integrate volunteers into the workforce and to manage complex stakeholder relations within communities. All this must be done with scarce resources and frequently, small budgets and workforces. This course includes analysis of the goals, environmental conditions and organizational structures of nonprofit health organizations, including a variety of smaller (and largely, non-medical) community-based nonprofits. Examples of the best managerial practices for these types of organizations and of commonly known NGOs and other nonprofits are used throughout the course.
  • Syllabus for HMP604

HMP606 Managerial Accounting for Health Care Administrators

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Singh, Simone
  • Prerequisites: Intermediate microeconomics theory
  • Description: Concepts and techniques of managerial accounting for generalist health care administrators. Topics covered include full cost measurement, differential cost measurement and analysis, sources of revenue, price setting, budgeting and control, costs and decision-making fund accounting

HMP607 Corporate Finance for Health Care Administrators

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): McCullough, Jeffrey
  • Prerequisites: HMP606
  • Description: Corporate finance theory and applications to health care organizations. Topics include the capital expenditure decision, the capital financing decision, financial feasibility, financial planning, cash management, and financial aspects of prepayment programs. The course makes extensive use of case studies.
  • Syllabus for HMP607

HMP608 Health Care Financial Accounting

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1-2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Comstock, Matthew
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course provides an overview of financial accounting for students interested in health care management and policy. It is designed to serve the needs of both students who have never had a course in financial accounting (for 2 credits) and students who have had an introductory course in financial accounting but without health care applications (for 1 credit).

HMP610 Cost-Effectiveness Analysis in Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Hutton, David
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr
  • Description: HMP 610 focuses on the use of cost effectiveness analysis to inform decisions about improving health. The course also covers a number of related analytical tools such as cost benefit analysis, decision analysis, and sensitivity analysis. Students will learn theoretical justifications for these tools as well as their limitations. The main goal is for students to understand when cost effectiveness analysis and related tools are appropriate and how to apply them in practice to a broad range of health issues.
  • Syllabus for HMP610

HMP615 Introduction to Public Health Policy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Jarman, Holly
  • Offered every year
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: Describes the nature of public policy interventions within the various domains of public health, the theoretical motivations for undertaking them, the influence of the political, bureaucratic, and social environmental in which policy decisions are made, the consequences of such decisions, and the key dimensions of analysis of the effects of public health policies. In addition to conceptual discussion of each of the above, the course includes evaluation of several case studies of public health policy decisions and their implications.
  • Syllabus for HMP615

HMP620 Professional Development

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Killaly, Catherine
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course is designed for HMP students to synthesize, integrate learning and to foster professional development and lifelong learning habits.
  • Course Goals: This course will allow HMP students to synthesize, integrate learning and to foster professional development and lifelong learning habits.
  • Competencies: Domain: Leadership C.3 Accountability: Hold self and others accountable to standards of performance; encourage commitment to the long-term good of the organization. C.6 Impact and Influence: Persuade and convince others, both individuals and groups, to support a point of view, position, or recommendation. Domain: Professional Development E.1 Actively seek feedback from others, reflecting and learning from successes and failures. E.2 Develop an accurate view of own strengths and developmental needs, including the impact one has on others. E.3 Continuously push self to raise personal standards of performance and exceed expectations. E.4 Address knowledge, skills, and other developmental gaps through reflective, self-directed learning, and by trying new approaches. E.5 Establish, build, and sustain a network for professional development.
  • Syllabus for HMP620

HMP622 Qualitative Methods for Health Policy Research

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Jarman, Holly
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: During the course, students will gain experience in creating a research plan, conducting interviews, analyzing interview data, and presenting their qualitative findings to an audience.
  • Course Goals: Understand how knowledge is generated from qualitative sources in public health and health services research; Evaluate qualitative research done by others in the discipline; Identify appropriate research methods and begin to design and conduct their own qualitative research projects on a basic level; Appreciate ethical questions raised by qualitative research and address them through research design.
  • Competencies: Identify appropriate sources and gather information, effectively and efficiently. ?Appraise literature and data critically.Understand the policy-making process and the role of politics; assess a problem and identify and compare potential policy solutions; and understand and critically assess methods to evaluate policy impact.Plan, oversee, and successfully execute large-scale projects involving significant resources, scope and impact.

HMP623 Principles and Practice of Preventive Medicine

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Power, Laura
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course is intended to introduce preventive medicine residents and graduate students to the principles of preventive medicine and public health via a seminar approach.
  • Course Goals: Goal: To introduce preventive medicine residents and public health graduate students to the principles of preventive medicine and public health via a seminar approach. Course Objectives (course competencies): 1.Individual seminars are facilitated by residency physician faculty and other invited physician faculty who provide guidance and oversight to the presenting resident for a given session. 2. Students will develop presentations that are based on peer review papers selected by the residents who also facilitate the participation of non-physicians enrolled in the course. 3.Students will present on topics including, but not limited to, emerging infectious diseases, cancer epidemiology, public health policy, preventive health services and management, immunizations, cardiovascular disease, and genomics.
  • Competencies: EPID: 2. Discuss population patterns of vital statistics, outbreaks, and health outcomes in terms of person, place and time. 8.Understand basic aspects of applied epidemiology in population, community, and/or hospital settings...and the relative use of epidemiological, clinical and laboratory information specific to each. 9.Demonstrate written and oral communication skills related to epidemiological sciences within the context of public health. HMP: 6. Understand and apply basic epidemiological principles, measures, and methods to assess the health status of a population; identify risk factors in individuals and communities; evaluate the impact of population-based interventions and initiatives. 8. Speak and write in a clear,logical;, and grammatical manner in formal and informal situations; prepare cogent business presentations; facilitate an effective group process. 10. Analyze the business, demographic, ethnocultural, political and regulatory implications of decisions and develop strategies that continually improve the long-term success and viability of the organization.
  • This course is cross-listed with EPID 650.

HMP625 COMPARATIVE HEALTH POLICY AND MANAGEMENT IN HIGH INCOME COUNTRIES

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Greer, Scott
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course is about the health policies and debates of the rich democracies. It should (1) furnish students with the basic language and toolkit of comparative health policy analysis and (2) introduce students to the comparative analysis of issues in health policy and management.
  • Course Goals: It should (1) furnish students with the basic language and toolkit of comparative health policy analysis and (2) introduce students to the comparative analysis and different global experience of issues in health policy and management. See also competencies, below.
  • Competencies: The competencies from the class are reflected in this assessment system. Students should improve your measurement and analysis skills, as seen in the presentations' requirements that students (1) Identify appropriate sources and gather information, using efficient technology where possible and (2) Appraise literature and data critically as well as the requirements that for presentations, writing, and class participation students will have to show your ability to analyse (1) policy and (2) strategy. Communications skills are at the heart of this class. Presentations, writing, and class participation measure students' ability to (1) speak and write in a clear, logical, and grammatical manner in formal and informal situations, to prepare cogent business presentations, and to facilitate a group. (2) receive, process, and respond appropriately to information conveyed by others and (3) accurately hear and understand the unspoken or partly expressed thoughts, feelings, and concerns of others. Students' leadership skills should develop and manifest themselves in your need to collaborate in group projects as well as to show your ability to develop strategic analyses and analyse accountability in any of the assignments, where you are identifying what people are doing and why. Finally, the discussion of law and political institutions should illuminate the role of law in strategy and planning.
  • Syllabus for HMP625

HMP626 Race, Ethnicity, Culture and Policy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Creary, Melissa
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: Graduate Standing
  • Description: This course is writing intensive and will critically examine aspects of health and policy reform from state and federal perspective. Taught primarily from a US perspective, topics with an international lens will be covered to explore domestic policy and international implications of policies and structures.

HMP627 Population Dynamics and Policy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mehta, Neil
  • Description: Examine the interrelationship between core population issues, public policy and health policy. A rigorous treatment of core population topics useful to designing effective policies. A broad array of population topics including population health and life expectancy, population aging, immigration, population and climate change, low fertility, and health disparities are covered.
  • Course Goals: Identify and understand core population issues and their importance to public health Evaluate academic and popular claims concerning population issues Know how to access population data and be able to evaluate their strengths and limitations Integrate knowledge of core population issues within professional undertakings in health policy Build skills in designing evidence-based policies
  • Competencies: A.1 Identify appropriate sources and gather information, effectively and efficiently. A.2 Appraise literature and data critically. A.9 Population health assessment: Understand and apply basic epidemiologic principles, measures, and methods to assess the health status of a population; identify risk factors in individuals and communities; evaluate the impact of population-based interventions and initiatives.

HMP630 Business of Biology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • This course is cross-listed with BA 518 in the Business Administration department.

HMP633 Health Insurance in America. How Did We Get Into This Mess? How Do We Get Out?

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Udow-Phillips, Marianne
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: HMP 600
  • Description: This course explores the history, structure and likely future trends of health insurance in the U.S. The course includes policy analyses of health insurance related issues focusing on potential solution alternatives to political and practical problems. It provides in depth overview of basic features of private and public health insurance.
  • Course Goals: The major objective of the course is to provide the student with a comprehensive understanding of how the United States public/private health insurance system functions. It will provide future health services leaders with a working knowledge of the interrelationships between public programs and private insurance and approaches to cost control using risk management, provider reimbursement, benefit design and other approaches.
  • Competencies: 1. Improvement in writing, presentation and analytic skills, focused on framing issues and developing logical approaches to the resolution of issues. 2. Practical understanding of how the private insurance market functions, including how the market is segmented and the competencies required for each segment. 3. Understanding of the impact of risk on private insurance and techniques that are utilized to manage and mitigate the influence of risk selection. 4. Identification of the different international models for health care financing and coverage and the unique aspects of the American system. 5. Appreciation of the distinction between lowering costs to improve competitive advantage and lowering overall health care costs and the tactics and strategies that could be developed for each approach. 6. Understanding of the challenges that confront the future viability of public health insurance programs, including assessment of the options that will be considered, and the strengths and weaknesses of centralized versus decentralized administrative models. 7. Improved skills in working with groups to evaluate and craft potential solutions to policy issues. 8. Recognize the challenges inherent in balancing affordability, access and quality in public and private health insurance programs and the tradeoffs that are required to achieve a mix that meets purchaser and political requirements.
  • Syllabus for HMP633

HMP636 Risk Management and Policy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Vinsel, Lee
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: Modern societies are dealing with a growing array of risks, including environmental pollution, communicable diseases, new technologies, and complex financial systems. Students will learn how governments try to manage risks through policymaking. How do they protect citizens and maintain their legitimacy and credibility without unduly restricting freedoms or stifling innovation?
  • Course Goals: To teach students: 1) theoretical approaches to risk and governance. 2) to introduce students to different ways that governments deal with risk and society; to help students understand policy controversies related to risk. 3) to discuss alternative possibilities for policy related to risk.
  • Competencies: There are no required prerequisites for the course but an understanding of the policy process is recommended. Students will develop their political and policy analysis and oral/written communication skills in the course.
  • This course is cross-listed with PubPol 659.

HMP644 Strategic Planning and Marketing in Health Care

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff Anthony, Denise
  • Prerequisites: HMP 600, HMP 601 or HMP 602 or PI
  • Description: Covers general concepts of strategic planning for business development and marketing as applied to health care settings. Topics include: assessing and understanding the needs of key customer groups; health consumer behavior; market segmentation and targeting; clinical staff needs and relations; forecasting service demand; new product development; product pricing and distribution; advertising and public relations; analysis of collaborative and competitive environments, and strategy formulation. Potential conflicts between an organization's business objectives and its participation with competitors in collaborative community benefit programs are also explored. In the 3 credit hour version of the course, extra emphasis is placed on experiential learning methodologies for developing health services strategic plans and the exploration of topics key to successful strategic positioning, business development, and marketing in the management of health care services.

HMP652 Health Law

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: HMP 600, 601
  • Description: The purpose of this course is to introduce public health students, especially those interested in health administration and management, to the legal issues they are likely to face in managing a health care organization. The goals of the course are for students to understand generally: the functions of and interaction between courts, legislatures, regulators; the role of the courts in health policy and health care delivery; how to recognize legal issues and communicate with attorneys; how law will affect students as strategic thinkers in health care positions; how to apply basic tort and contract principles; and how to apply basic corporate law and antitrust principles. Specific topics will vary, but will usually include: liability; health care institutions as corporations; antitrust; tax exemption; privacy and confidentiality; regulatory oversight of health care systems, including quality of care; legal requirements for access to health care; nondiscrimination; and general employment issues. This class can be taken as an elective or in fulfillment of the law/politics requirement.
  • Syllabus for HMP652

HMP654 Operations Research and Control Systems

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Hutton, David Mendez, David
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 503 or Biostat 553 or equiv and Grad Status
  • Description: Provides rational framework for decision making for both operating and control systems in the hospital environment. Emphasizes basic modeling techniques and examples of actual hospital applications. Aims at thorough understanding of concepts of total value analysis, objective function formation, and exception reporting. Students become familiar with operations research techniques of inventory modeling, queuing, computer simulation, PERT/CPM, mathematical programming, and quality control. Presentation emphasizes objectives, constraints, and required assumptions of each of these techniques as applied to specific hospital examples.
  • Syllabus for HMP654

HMP661 Managing Health Informatics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s):
  • Prerequisites: Introduction to Health Informatics
  • Description: The course will prepare students to take on management challenges faced in health informatics leadership roles within a variety of organizational settings. It will be a highly interactive course in which students will have the opportunity to apply theory when discussing real-world health informatics scenarios from a variety of perspectives.
  • Course Goals: (1) To equip students with the relevant theories and health informatics content knowledge to become effective leaders within health-related organizations. (2) To expose students to real-world managerial decisions in the health informatics domain. (3) To enable students to consider multiple dimensions of decisions in uncertain and ambiguous scenarios and articulate the justification for their chosen approach.
  • Competencies: Domain 1: Measurement and Analysis Measurement: A.8 Operational analysis: Analyze, design, or improve an organizational process, including the use of quality management, process improvement, marketing and information technology principles and tools. A.10 Decision Making: Implement a decision-making process that incorporates evidence from a broad analysis that includes uncertainty, risk, stakeholders, and organizational values. Domain 2: Communication B.1 Convey: Speak and write in a clear, logical, and grammatical manner in formal and informal situations; prepare cogent business presentations; facilitate an effective group process.* B.2 Listen: Receive, process, and respond appropriately to information conveyed by others. B.3 Interact: Perceive and respond appropriately to the spoken, unspoken or partly expressed thoughts, feelings, and concerns of others.* Domain 3: Leadership C.1 Organizational Vision: Through effective governance, establish an organization's values, vision, and mission; systematically enhance performance and human, material and knowledge resources. C.2 Strategic Orientation: Analyze the business, demographic, ethno-cultural, political, and regulatory implications of decisions and develop strategies that continually improve the long-term success and viability of the organization.* C.4 Change Leadership: Energize stakeholders and sustain their commitment to the organization while adapting to changes in the environment.* C.6 Impact and Influence: Persuade and convince others, both individuals and groups, to support a point of view, position, or recommendation.* C.7 Organizational Awareness: Understand and learn from governance structures, formal and informal decision-making structures, and power relationships in an organization, industry, or community. C.8 Project Management: Plan, oversee, and successfully execute large-scale projects involving significant resources, scope and impact.* Domain 5: Professional Development Self-Awareness: E.2 Develop an accurate view of own strengths and developmental needs, including the impact one has on others.* E.3 Continuously push self to raise personal standards of performance and exceed expectations. E.4 Address knowledge, skills, and other developmental gaps through reflective, self-directed learning, and by trying new approaches.*
  • This course is cross-listed with SI 661.

HMP668 Introduction to Health Informatics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Graduate status
  • Description: This course introduces students to the concepts and practices of health informatics. Topics include: a) an introduction to the health informatics field; b) major applications and commercial vendors; c) decision support methods and technologies; d) analysis, design, implementation, and evaluation of healthcare information systems; and e) new opportunities and emerging trends. A semester-long group project provides students with hands-on experience in planning and building healthcare information systems; associated ethical and legal topics, software engineering and human-computer interaction issues, and user adoption and outcome evaluation methodologies will also be addressed.
  • This course is cross-listed with SI542, BI668 in the School of Information, School of Medicine (tentative), and Bioinformatics Graduate Program at Center for Computational Medicine and Biology (tentative) department.
  • Syllabus for HMP668

HMP669 Database Systems and Internet Applications in Health Care

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: Grad status
  • Description: This course covers relation database theory and database-web systems with applications to health care. The students are expected to develop a working knowledge of design, implementation, administration and maintenance of small to medium relational database systems. The students will also be exposed to current technology for deployment, use and administration of relational databases through the Internet.
  • Syllabus for HMP669

HMP674 The Economics of Health Management and Policy II

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: HMP 660
  • Description: The focus of the course is on how the demand for and supply of health care services interact to yield market outcomes (prices and quantities) in health and health care. The purpose of the course is to give students experience analyzing health management and health policy issues using economic tools.

HMP677 Health Care Organization: An International Perspective

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Liang, Jersey
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Description: Course examines health care systems in approximately eight developed and developing nations (e.g., United States, Germany, Japan, Canada, United Kingdom, China, Mexico, and Kenya). Comparisons made in: population health, health care financing and control,health professionals and their patients, health care organization, and health system performance and reform strategies.

HMP680 Special Topics in Health Management and Policy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: Lecture, seminars and readings selected on a current or emerging topic or theme in health, management and policy. The specific material and format will vary by semester and instructor.
  • Course Goals: Will vary by topic and instructor.
  • Competencies: Will vary by topic and instructor.

HMP683 Quality of Care

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s):
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: HMP 601 or HMP 602
  • Description: Focuses on the concepts and practices of quality of care assessment, control, and improvement in health care delivery settings. Designed to provide an in-depth understanding of basic concepts and frameworks and of their applicability and relevance in specific situations. Covers major approaches to quality of care assessment, improvement, and control currently in use in the health care field.
  • Syllabus for HMP683

HMP690 Readings in Health Management and Policy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status and Perm Instr
  • Description: Directed readings or research on selected topics and problems relevant to health management and policy. May be elected more than once.

HMP693 Mental Health Policy in the United States

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Eisenberg, Daniel
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Description: The course uses an interactive, seminar format to analyze major policy problems and opportunities related to mental health. The course focuses on two interrelated questions: which programs and policies represent the best investments in mental health for children and youth, and are we making those investments as a society?
  • Syllabus for HMP693

HMP696 Concepts in Health Informatics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Adler-Milstein, Julia
  • Prerequisites: Graduate status
  • Description: This course provides students a formal framework in which to discuss contemporary topics in health informatics. Topics include: architecture, interoperability, usability, public policy, outreach and patient-centric care and technology-enhanced computation.
  • Course Goals: To provide students an overview of key concepts and methodologies in biomedical (health) informatics research.
  • Competencies: Information seeking; Critical thinking; Qualitative & quantitative analysis; Communication.
  • Learning Objectives: To develop essential skills of conducting successful biomedical (health) informatics research or research-alike activities (e.g., health IT outcomes evaluation) at the technical, sociotechnical, organizational, and system levels to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of adoption of information technologies in healthcare.
  • This course is cross-listed with BIOINF555 in the Bioinformatics Graduate Program, Center for Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, The University of Michigan Medical School. department.
  • Syllabus for HMP696

HMP802 Introduction to Health Services and Policy Research

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Ryan, Andrew
  • Prerequisites: First-year HSOP student or permission of instructor
  • Description: This is a doctoral-level introductory course to health services and policy research. The course involves a general survey of substantive issues in health services and policy research and a critical analysis of theories and research designs that are used to advance knowledge of those issues.
  • Course Goals: The purpose of the course is to foster your development into a health services and policy researcher. To accomplish this, the course involves a general survey of substantive issues in health services research and a critical analysis of theories and research designs that are used to advance knowledge of those issues. By the end of the course you should have knowledge of the main institutions, policy issues, and research areas and questions that pertain to health services research. You should also have an initial understanding of where the most promising and pressing areas of research lie within this field. Thus, this course is about the past, present, and future of the field.
  • Competencies: *Broad knowledge of health services and policy research (main topics, seminal papers, range of disciplinary approaches) *Critical analysis of empirical studies in this field *Conduct of a review synthesizing previous empirical studies

HMP803 Doctoral Seminar in Health Services and Systems Research I

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Lee, Shoou-Yih Daniel
  • Description: The health services research module will provide an introduction to the philosophy, history, and approaches of health services research and a sample of research topics that have been approached by health services systems researchers.
  • Course Goals: The health services research module will provide an introduction to the philosophy, history, and approaches of health services research and a sample of research topics that have been approached by health services systems researchers.
  • Competencies: This course will contribute to basic knowledge competencies in understanding the field of health services research and its applications, as well as conceptual competencies regarding the framing of useful and answerable questions within this field.
  • Learning Objectives: Students should gain a better understanding of the content of the field of health services research and the diverse approaches and uses of this research.

HMP804 Doctoral Seminar in Health Services and Systems Research II

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mendez, David Hutton, David Prosser, Lisa
  • Description: HMP804/Medical Sociology and Organizational Theory Module consists of six 2.5-hour weekly sessions, and it will be conducted as a seminar. Before each session, all students are expected to complete the required reading assignments in preparation for a lively and informed discussion in class. In addition, each student is expected to submit a study log, which should include one's reactions, reflections, and questions for discussion. At each session, there will be a division of labor among students in summarizing the assigned readings and leading a discussion of them. The discussion will center on conceptual, analytical, and applied issues, whereas the instructor will serve as the moderator and a sounding board.
  • Course Goals: Within the HSOP curriculum, students studying sociology can choose to focus on either medical sociology or organizational studies. This module provides all HSOP students to an overview of the theory and methods of each of these sub-fields. Sociology provides a unique set of lenses in defining, understanding, and interpreting issues related to health and health care. The HMP 804 aims to provide an initial overview of medical sociology and organizational studies. In addition, it offers several illustrations of how selected sociological perspectives (i.e., social stratification, life course, and theories of how organizations respond to their environments) can be applied to research in public health and analysis of health policy issues. Finally, a session will allow an in depth discussion of medical sociology and organizational studies as applied to research and policy analysis related to obesity.
  • Competencies: To receive credit for the module, students are expected to attend all sessions, read the assigned articles, and provide feedback that demonstrates an understanding of the key points of the readings and discussion.
  • Learning Objectives: Students will gain an initial understanding of the sociological and organizational approaches in health services research and public health. In particular, the students will be exposed selected sociological paradigms, analytical methods, and how they are applied to the analysis of population health, health care, and related policy issues.
  • Syllabus for HMP804

HMP815 Readings in Medical Care

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Liang, Jersey
  • Prerequisites: Perm Instr
  • Description: Directed readings in special areas. May be elected more than once. Primarily for doctoral students in Health Services Organization and Policy.

HMP827 Advanced Seminar in Health Care Economics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): McCullough, Jeffrey
  • Prerequisites: Econ 501 and Perm Instr
  • Description: Analysis of the application of advanced economic theory to problems in the health services field. Focuses on several health economics issues, including topics of current policy interest as well as topics for which the application of economic theory has been more fully explored, Classes will include a general discussion of the appropriate economic theory and empirical evidence and a critical review of the relevant health economics literature. Students must read approximately 30-40 articles and write several short papers.

HMP833 Research Topics in Sociology and Health Care Organization

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: HMP doctoral students or P.I.
  • Description: HSOP Program requirements. A topic in sociology and health care organization-policy is selected each term for detailed critical, theoretical, and methodological analysis leading to development, in class, of propositions aimed at advancing scientific status of the area of inquiry. Analysis and development of content follows logic of the research paradigm. Required of students with a sociology cognate in the doctoral program in Health Services Organization and Policy

HMP835 Research Practicum

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 3-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: HMP 809, Perm Instr
  • Description: The purpose of this course is to allow each student, early in his or her doctoral career, to gain experience in the actual performance of health services research. The experience will enable students to build sound research skills and to gain knowledge of the nature of inquiry in their discipline as well as in the field of health services research. Each student in the HSOP program is expected to elect a total of 6 credits in HMP 835.

HMP990 Dissertation/Precandidates

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to status as candidate.

HMP995 Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students admitted as candidates

NUTR547 Food Science

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Aaronson, Susan
  • Offered every other year
  • Last offered Fall 2009
  • Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry
  • Description: An examination of food composition and the chemical and physical changes that result from food processing, preparation and cooking. Discussion of foods as complex systems containing a wide variety of chemicals including nutrients, phytochemicals, functional ingredients, natural or transferred toxins and additives. Discussion of changes in chemicals with different types of food preservation. Consideration of health risks associated with dietary exposure to selected nutrients and other chemicals. Exploration of the role of sensory analysis related to food acceptance. Overview of important regulations related to the content of food products.

NUTR555 Foundations of Sustainable Food Systems

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Jones, Andrew
  • Prerequisites: None.
  • Description: This course teaches about food systems through interdisciplinary, experiential learning and dialogue-based inquiry. In addition to learning how to bridge worldviews and apply systems thinking, students will study the unique perspectives of public health nutritionists involved in addressing complex food systems problems.
  • Course Goals: During this course, students will: 1) study the characteristics, outcomes, objectives and values of different contemporary food systems in the Global North and South; 2) analyze and critique peer-reviewed literature examining the processes and outcomes of food systems models through an interdisciplinary lens; 3) practice communicating ideas about food systems in oral presentations to peers in a group setting; 4) participate as a member of a multidisciplinary team; 5) engage with food systems stakeholders in classroom and field settings; and 6) explore their own and others' diverse values and viewpoints about food systems based on supporting evidence.
  • Competencies: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) describe key concepts across disciplines and perspectives related to sustainable food systems; 2) evaluate assumptions and values about food systems that underpin one's own thinking and that of others; 3) apply and synthesize scientific evidence in support of arguments that address food systems research questions; 4) analyze and critically evaluate food systems research results for evidence-based assessments and ethical decision-making; 5) communicate clearly and effectively about food systems through writing and oral presentations in a professional setting of diverse peers; and 6) engage in respectful dialogue, collaborative teamwork, and problem-solving with those of differing viewpoints and backgrounds.

NUTR578 Practical Projects

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Practical Projects is the application of theory and principles of Nutritional Sciences to individual community-based public health settings. Course requirements include an approved practical project related to Nutritional Sciences in consultation with a faculty advisor. The experience is documented in an integrative paper demonstrating the scientific application of NS theories and principles to the practical project. May be elected more than once. Enrollment is limited to NS students with at least two full terms completed prior to registration.
  • Course Goals: To provide students with the opportunity to apply theory and principles of Nutritional Sciences to individual community-based public health settings.
  • Competencies: Depending upon the agency and type of work, the following competencies will be met: 1.Gather, evaluate and interpret nutrition information to assess, plan, implement, and evaluate food and nutrition programs. 2.Utilize appropriate nutritional assessment methods to prioritize nutrition concerns of individuals and target populations. 3.Assess populations in organizational and population-based settings through collection of quantitative and qualitative data. 4.Apply theoretical frameworks and research evidence to inform public health actions. 5.Apply epidemiologic and statistical methods to nutrition assessment, action, and/or evaluation.

NUTR600 Professional Development in the Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Olivia
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status, Completion of approved internship, research or practical experience
  • Description: This is a capstone course for Nutritional Sciences Master of Public Health students as they transition from a novice to an expert from the first to second year of the degree program. In this course, students will apply the knowledge learned from the curriculum and field experience to real-life applications.

NUTR621 Eating Disorders Prevention & Treatment

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Sonneville, Kendrin
  • Prerequisites: STAT250 or STAT280 or BIOSTATS501/521 (concurrent)
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course is designed to introduce students to eating disorders using a public health framework. Students will examine primary, secondary, and tertiary approaches to eating disorders prevention and will be exposed to topics relevant to public health, including integrating obesity and eating disorders prevention.

NUTR624 Nutritional Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Baylin, Ana
  • Prerequisites: EPID503, EPID 600 or EPID 601
  • Description: This course is designed for Master students in the Department of Nutritional Sciences who are interested in conducting or better interpreting epidemiologic studies on nutrition and disease. The course will review methodological issues involved in the design, conduct, analysis and interpretation of studies investigating the relationship between diet and disease.
  • Course Goals: 1. Understand methodological concepts on Nutritional Epidemiology 2. Demonstrate a working knowledge of the main methods used in Nutritional Epidemiology 3. Synthesize and interpret the scientific literature on Nutritional Epidemiology.

NUTR625 Nutrition and the Immune Response

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mancuso, Peter
  • Prerequisites: any BIOLOGY course from 100-400
  • Description: Food and nutritional status have a profound influence on immune function. Food and nutritional status can maintain immune homeostasis, contribute to immune suppression, enhance chronic inflammation, or provoke an allergic response.The course consists of lectures on basic principles of immunology and presentations and discussion of peer-reviewed literature.

NUTR630 Principles of Nutritional Science

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Olivia Bridges, Dave
  • Description: This course presents foundational knowledge on nutritional metabolism of macronutrients. The digestion, absorption, transport, utilization and storage of macronutrients in humans are the focus. This course integrates biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrient utilization, interactions and metabolic regulation in humans.

NUTR636 Medical Nutrition Therapy I

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Hudson, Liz
  • Prerequisites: EHS 630
  • Description: Medical nutrition therapy and disease pathophysiology taught for malnutrition, starvation, metabolic stress, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, pulmonary and neoplasm. Current controversies are briefly introduced. Clinical nutrition screening, assessment, use of clinical laboratory data, and physical assessment are also introduced.

NUTR638 Nutrigenomics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Seo, Young-Ah
  • Description: This course aims to understand, in depth, the influence of genetics on micronutrient metabolism, and implications for human diseases including inherited inborn disease, metabolic disease, cancer, neurodevelopment, and neurodegenerative diseases, etc.
  • Course Goals: Students taking this course are expected to learn about: 1. Etiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of micronutrient related human genetic disorders 2. Interactions of micronutrients with human disease states 3. Influence of genetic variation on nutritional requirement 4. Role of genetics in human nutrient metabolism 5. Regulation of genetics on cellular and molecular metabolism
  • Competencies: After taking this course, students should be able to: 1. Understand etiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of human genetic disorders 2. Understand interactions of micronutrients with human disease 3. Identify clinical symptoms associated with the pathophysiology of human genetic disorders 4. Understand the cellular and physiological mechanisms that cause human genetic disorders 5. Suggest potential mechanisms by which specific dietary factors contribute to treatment of diseases
  • Learning Objectives: Students taking this course are expected to learn about: 1. Etiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of micronutrient related human genetic disorders 2. Interactions of micronutrients with human disease states 3. Influence of genetic variation on nutritional requirement 4. Role of genetics in human nutrient metabolism 5. Regulation of genetics on cellular and molecular metabolism

NUTR639 Pathophysiology of Obesity

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mancuso, Peter
  • Prerequisites: NUTR 630
  • Description: This course provides a framework for understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of obesity. The course content will emphasize the influence of physiologic factors that contribute to overconsumption of food, the pathophysiologic consequences of obesity, and current methods of treatment.
  • Course Goals: The goal for students taking this course is to learn about: 1) Assessment and interpretation of body composition in adult and pediatric populations; 2) the influence of diet behavioral modification pharmacologic and surgical interventions.
  • Competencies: Following the completion of this course students who complete this course are expected to be able to: 1) Define categories of overweight or obesity given body composition information; 2) Identify important contributing factors to weight gain and the inappropriate consumption of food; 3) Suggest appropriate strategies in the prevention of obesity; 4) Identify eating disorders and suggest appropriate intervention; 5) Understand the neurophysiologic mechanisms that control feeding behavior; 6) Describe how endocrine and adipose derived factors influence food intake and the development of chronic disease; 7) Identify clinical symptoms associated with the pathophysiology of obesity; 8) Suggest potential mechanisms by which specific dietary behavioral factors and physical activity contribute to weight gain and loss; and 9) Apply knowledge of the role of environment food and lifestyle choices to develop interventions to affect change and enhance wellness in diverse individuals and populations.

NUTR640 Nutritional Assessment

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Cole, Suzanne
  • Prerequisites: EHS 630, Nutrition Science
  • Description: This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the methods and approaches for conducting nutrition assessment of individuals and populations throughout the lifecycle. The course is structured into three assessment components: dietary, biochemical, and body size and body composition. Main topics include in-depth overview of the assessment methods, strengths and limitations of methodology, evaluation and interpretation of assessment data, sources of measurement errors, validity of assessment methods, and basic analytical approaches used to interpret assessment data.

NUTR642 Community Nutrition

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Cole, Suzanne
  • Prerequisites: EHS 630
  • Description: This course is a discussion of the principles and programs developed to improve the dietary intake and the nutritional status of individuals and groups within a community. Primary topics covered include: government and nongovernment nutrition-related programs, groups at nutritional risk, nutritional issues/concerns across the lifecycle, and an introduction to developing community-based nutrition intervention programs (needs assessment, intervention, and evaluation). Didactic lectures and guest presentations accompanied with an in-depth needs assessment and intervention project and a community service-learning component will provide students the opportunity to integrate and apply knowledge through a hands-on approach.

NUTR644 Global Food Systems Policy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Jones, Andrew
  • Prerequisites: None.
  • Description: This course will explore the process of developing policies in low- and middle-income countries that are targeted at altering the nature and functioning of food systems. We will assess policy contexts, stakeholders' priorities, the translation of policies into programs, and the impacts of policies on nutrition and health outcomes.
  • Course Goals: During this course, students will: 1) read and critically analyze food systems policy analysis and policy case studies; 2) practice communicating critical analysis of research and policies through formal presentations; 3) facilitate in-class discussion amongst peers; 4) practice designing and developing policy case studies that involve critical analysis of the policy process; 5) practice receiving constructive feedback from peers and incorporating it into theoretical thinking and writing; and 6) provide respectful and thoughtful feedback to their peers.
  • Competencies: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) understand definitions, concepts, and principles related to the policy process, the formation of food systems policies globally, and their impacts on nutritional outcomes relevant to public health; 2) analyze and critically evaluate food systems policies; 3) apply and synthesize evidence to design and develop policy recommendations for food systems change that have direct relevance to public health nutrition; 4) communicate clearly and effectively through oral presentations and discussions with diverse peers; and 5) engage in respectful dialogue with those of differing viewpoints and backgrounds.
  • Syllabus for NUTR644

NUTR688 Research Topics in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Seo, Young-Ah
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course will introduce students to current topics in nutrition research. Students will attend seminars focused on research that will demonstrate the impact of nutrition on human health. Students are encouraged to pose questions to the speaker and write 5-7 bullet points that provide a summary of each presentation.

NUTR697 Readings in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Supervised study/review of a selected topic in nutritional sciences. May be elected more than once for a maximum of six credits.

NUTR698 Research in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Original research investigation of a special topic in nutritional sciences.

NUTR699 Masters Thesis in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm of Thesis Advisor
  • Description: This course shall be elected by students enrolled in Master's degree programs that require a formal written thesis as a condition of program completion. The thesis shall be defended in front of the student's thesis committee. The course grade will reflect the student's accomplishments relative to the thesis and its defense. The course is to be elected only once.

NUTR796 Special Topics in Nutritional Sciences

NUTR830 Advanced Topics in Macronutrient Metabolism

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Bridges, Dave
  • Prerequisites: NUTR630 and NUTR631
  • Description: This course is an elective designed for research-based molecular nutrition students. It will introduce topics and methods in biochemical and molecular nutrition research. We will use group discussions and individual projects to enhance critical analysis skills and learn how to follow in the rapidly advancing field of molecular nutrition.
  • Course Goals: * To provide advanced knowledge on macromolecular nutrition. * Learn to evaluate research articles in molecular nutrition. * Familiarize students with current methods in molecular nutrition research.
  • Competencies: * Generate out a literature review on a emerging topic related to molecular nutrition. * Produce a review of a research article on the basis of its premise, methods, interpretation and congruence with previous results. * Formulate alternative methods to assess or advance a finding. * Generate a research proposal that would test a novel hypothesis and propose methodologies to test it. * Evaluate a research proposal according to NIH criteria including assessment of novelty and proposed approach. * Participate in a mock review panel to judge an innovative research proposal. * Analytically discuss research with colleagues and future employers.
  • Learning Objectives: * Develop high critical thinking skills such as synthesis and projecting future studies within recent macromolecular nutrition topics. * Learn how to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of nutrition research. * Gain fluency in the molecular nutrition literature including how to assess the validity of claims. * Familiarize yourself with the process of developing research grant proposals and reviews. * Identify limitations in research articles, and how this affects the rigor and universality of their conclusions. * Interpret and evaluate modern molecular nutrition methods based on their implementation and appropriate controls. * Evaluate emerging themes in macromolecular nutrition that affect individual responses to the diet.

NUTR869 Innovations in Nutrition Research

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Perng, Wei Peterson, Karen Staff
  • Prerequisites: Doctoral, MPH and MS student with demonstrated interest in Nutritional Sciences research (with permission),Doctoral, MPH and MS student with demonstrated interest in Nutritional Sciences research (with permission)
  • Description: The course will include: -integrative discussions of dissertation research projects -presentations of research findings -in-depth literature reviews and critiques -manuscript reviews in Nutritional Sciences
  • Course Goals: Using the techniques that are discussed in the course description and with assistance from the assigned faculty mentor.
  • Competencies: Critical analysis of relevant literature.Practice and refine oral speaking while disseminating scientific information related to research interests in Nutritional Sciences.

NUTR899 Advanced Research in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Must be a PhD student in Nutritional Sciences
  • Description: Original investigations of a specific research topic in Nutritional Sciences. Designed for doctoral students performing research prior to passing their qualifying exams. Students will complete two separate rotations with faculty members for a minimum of 1 credit each. This course may be elected more than once.
  • Course Goals: Expose PhD students to Nutritional Sciences research opportunities in order to assist students in exploring interest areas and a dissertation topic.
  • Competencies: To be determined with the faculty member and the student based upon the research rotation.

NUTR990 Dissertation Research/Pre-Candidate

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Nutritional Sciences Doctoral Student
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to status as a candidate.

NUTR995 Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Nutritional Sciences Doctoral Student
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student who has been admitted to status as a candidate

PUBHLTH200 Health and Society: Introduction to Public Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Franzblau, Alfred Kennedy, Sheela
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description:

    This course is intended to serve as an introduction to the major issues of public health with a focus on the United States, although global health issues are considered as well. We will examine what those issues are, what determines them, and how they can be altered. As a survey of the entire field of public health, the course provides a broad overview for students wishing no more than an introduction to the field, as well as good grounding for students who wish to pursue additional coursework in public health.

    The winter term offering is a blended learning course. It combines online content and activities with face-to-face learning.

    This course is a prerequisite for admission to the undergraduate degree program in Public Health. This course satisfies LSA's Race and Ethnicity requirement and counts as 4 credits towards LSA's Social Science requirement.

  • Course Goals: The course should provide a broad overview for students wishing no more than an introduction to the field, as well as good grounding for students who wish to pursue additional coursework in the subject.
  • Competencies: The specific course objectives are expressed within the following competencies:
    1. Students will be able to identify the principal determinants of health and disease, including the determinants of inequalities in the health of groups differentiated by race, ethnicity, and economic status.
    2. Students will be able to explain what public health is, what distinguishes it from the other health sciences, and what unique contributions it has to make to the health of the public.
    3. Students will understand when governments should intervene in matters pertaining to the health of the public and when they should not. They will be able to describe the major formal organizational structures within the United States responsible for monitoring and improving the public's health.
    4. Students will be able to describe the basic approaches and purposes of the two major analytical methods of public health, epidemiology and biostatistics, without achieving mastery of the methods (i.e., this is not a methods course; that is the subject of other courses).
    5. Students will be able to explain the biomedical basis of infectious and chronic diseases and congenital abnormalities, again without developing detailed expertise on these subjects.
    6. Students will be able to identify the principal social and behavioral determinants of health and demonstrate how they come into influence the most important behavior-related health problems of the day.
    7. Students will be able to identify the principal environmental determinants of health and describe the major environmental health issues of the present time.
    8. Students will be able to explain the role of public health in medical care and identify the principal problems in the U.S. health care system.
    9. Students will be able to itemize critical issues in global health, with a special focus on health in poor countries.
  • Learning Objectives: To give undergraduates a good understanding of what is really important in public health, what determines health, and how society influences health.
  • This course is cross-listed with Pubpol 210 in the Ford School department.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH200

PUBHLTH305 The Environment And Human Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Rozek, Laura
  • Offered every year
  • Description: This course introduces major issues of environmental health science. We will examine what those issues are, what determines them, and how they can be altered. The course provides an overview for students who want an introduction to environmental health as well as students planning to pursue additional environmental health coursework.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH305

PUBHLTH311 Introduction to Public Health Genetics

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Marrs, Carl F
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Course designed for those with limited exposure to biology who are interested in human genetics. Will include basics of genetics at both the molecular and population level, plus some ethical, legal, and social implications of genetics research will be examined. Examples relevant to public health will be emphasized.
  • Course Goals: The goal of this course is to teach the basics of genetics so that students who successfully complete the course will be prepared to take any additional courses that have introductory genetics as a prerequisite.
  • Competencies: Course Learning Outcomes: 1) Describe how the concepts of Mendel are relevant to human genetic diseases. 2) Understand the fundamental mechanisms of how genetic information is transmitted from one generation to the next. 3) Understand how the genetic information is translated into the materials needed to create the body and allow it to function. 4) Understand the different types of mutations that can occur and their consequences. 5) Analyze how variations in populations affect our abilities to determine the genetic elements involved in disease. 6) Describe the role genetic changes play in cancer development. 7) Understand the role of genetic screening and testing in public health and medicine. 8) Discuss some of the ethical, legal and social issues associated with human genetics.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH311

PUBHLTH350 Global Public Health: Challenges and Transformations

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Boulton, Matthew
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course integrates foundational principles of political science and international studies in an exploration of epidemiological transitions, goal-setting in international organizations, and other global public health challenges. Students will investigate health disparities between countries and between socioeconomic groups within a country, and will discuss key communicable and non-communicable health conditions.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH350

PUBHLTH360 Community, Culture, and Social Justice (CCSJ) in Public Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Harper, Gary
  • Description: Students will explore social constructions of health, and examine the interplay of community, cultural, ethical, social, economic, environmental, political and social justice forces that shape health. Concepts of community, culture, and social justice will be explored and students will examine how these concepts can be applied to public health interventions.
  • Course Goals: Students will be able to evaluate and critique how the concepts of community, culture and social justice are applied to public health interventions.
  • Competencies: By the end of this course students should be able to: 1. Describe various social constructions of health both locally and globally. 2. Describe how community, cultural, ethical, social, economic, environmental, political and social justice forces shape human health both locally and globally using a social determinants of health framework. 3. Compare and contrast the concepts of health disparities, health inequalities, and health inequities. 4. Examine a public health intervention using a critical analysis approach. 5. Compare various meanings of community, culture, and social justice that are used in public health and other related disciplines. 6. Critique the ways in which the concepts of community, culture, and social justice are applied to public health interventions both locally and globally.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH360

PUBHLTH370 Public Health Biology and Pathophysiology

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Karvonen-Gutierrez, Carrie
  • Prerequisites: None.
  • Description: This course provides a foundation of biology and pathophysiology concepts necessary for the practice of public health including an evaluation of the natural history and mechanisms underlying infectious and chronic human diseases. This course will also address population-level targets for prevention and treatment of major diseases of human health.
  • Course Goals: The goals of this course are to provide students with a fundamental understanding of the biology and pathophysiology underlying major human diseases which cause significant morbidity or mortality and to develop an appreciation for the role of public health in the prevention, identification, and treatment of human disease.
  • Competencies: The course outcomes are focused upon the following learning objectives: 1. Understand the role of structure and function in the regulation of normal physiology; 2. Describe national and global trends in morbidity and mortality; 3. Describe the natural history and physiology of diseases of high importance to public health; 4. Specify the role of the immune system in population health; 5. Identify important behavioral, environmental, and infectious risk factors for diseases of public health importance; 6. Discuss the interactions of genetics and environmental factors in disease causation; 7. Apply biological principles to the development and implementation of disease prevention, control, or management programs; 8. Integrate general scientific and laboratory concepts into public health research and practice.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH370

PUBHLTH381 Public Health Systems: Achievements and Challenges

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Creary, Melissa
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH 200 and Jr. or Sr. Standing OR declared PUBHLTH major
  • Description: This course will provide an overview of the essential role of the public health system, which includes health care systems, government organizations and non-governmental organizations, in improving health locally and globally. The top achievements in public health will be critically examined along with current and emerging challenges and threats to human health and well-being, including health inequities. Mechanisms and measures for evaluating human health and illness will be discussed. This course will emphasize multidisciplinary and multi-sector approaches to health promotion and disease prevention.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH381

PUBHLTH384 Creating Change in Public Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Strecher, Vic
  • Prerequisites: [PUBHLTH 200; (C- or better) & Junior or Senior Standing] or Public Health Major
  • Description: This course introduces students to strategies as well as best practices and challenges in translating strategies into public health policies, programs and practices. This course provides an overview of stakeholders who create, enact, and assess health promotion strategies. Students will identify, define and evaluate strategies to address public health issues.
  • Course Goals: Understand the relationship between political power, economic power, and health; identify political determinants of health, and develop your understanding of and skills for effective action in community engagement and advocacy as well as formal politics.
  • Competencies: Program Domains: Planning, Implementation, Assessment and Evaluation Apply the fundamental concepts and features of program planning, implementation, assessment or evaluation to improve individual and community health. Health Policy, Law, Ethics, and Economics Explain the problems and current issues related to health and health care in the US and globally and infer potential solutions. Health Communication Illustrate the basic concepts of effective and persuasive public health communication through multiple modalities, including technical and professional writing and the use of mass media and electronic technology. Problem Solving Apply problem-solving skills to develop critical, innovative and entrepreneurial approaches to improving the public's health.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Explain the process for tailoring intervention messages based on the specific audiences, content and media channels 2. Discuss the legal, ethical and economic implications of public health policies and interventions 3. Describe principles of planning, implementing and evaluating public health programs and interventions 4. Compare and contrast the roles of various policy-forming bodies (agencies, organizations, governments) in public health promotion 5. Explore various conceptualizations of effectiveness with regard to public health strategies
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH384

PUBHLTH401 Exploring the public health spectrum of cancer: from prevention to survivorship

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mondul, Alison
  • Description: The course will review the socio-demographic magnitude of cancer in the US and globally, basic concepts of cancer biology and the causes of cancer. Major risk factors such as tobacco and obesity will be discussed. Students will be introduced to the concepts of prevention, screening, treatment, and survivorship.
  • Course Goals: Be familiar with the socio-demographic magnitude of cancer in the US and globally, basic concepts of cancer biology and the causes of cancer. Be able to identify major risk factors for cancer such as tobacco and obesity. Be familiar with the concepts of prevention, screening, treatment, and survivorship. Understand the application of epidemiologic methods to the study of cancer. Understand the role of the environment and social determinants of health in cancer.
  • Competencies: 1. Describe the socio-demographic magnitude of cancer in the US including racial/ethnic disparities. 2. Describe the socio-demographic magnitude of cancer globally; be able to compare and contrast cancer in developed vs. developing countries. 3. Describe the basic concepts of cancer biology. 4. Describe the causes of cancer. 5. Identify major risk factors for cancer such as tobacco and obesity. 6. Describe the role of the environment and social determinants in cancer. 7. Describe primary, secondary, and tertiary cancer prevention efforts. 8. Explain the role of screening in cancer prevention. 9. Describe the basic concepts of the current state of cancer treatment. 10. Describe how epidemiologic methods are applied in the study of cancer. 11. Describe the current state of epidemiologic research for several major cancer sites. 12. Discuss the psychosocial issues surrounding cancer survivorship.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH401

PUBHLTH403 Obesity: From Cells to Society

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Bridges, Dave Bauer, Kate
  • Description: This course provides a comprehensive introduction to obesity, a highly prevalent chronic disease in the US and worldwide. Through collaboratory instruction, we will approach the topic of obesity from biological, behavioral, and social science perspectives, providing students from diverse backgrounds fundamental knowledge and insight into current scientific questions and debates.
  • Course Goals: The goal of this course is to provide a broad overview of obesity to undergraduate students. We will draw upon public health knowledge gained in PUBH200 by applying topics including assessment, surveillance, epidemiology, pathophysiology, prevention and treatment strategies, and public health policy to the topic of obesity.
  • Competencies: Through completion of this course, students will obtain the following competencies: 1. Understand definitions and assessment of obesity, 2. Describe recent trends and disparities in obesity prevalence in the US and globally, 3. Identify biological, behavioral, and social determinants of obesity, 4. Describe the health and economic consequences of obesity, and 5. Critically evaluate approaches to the prevention and treatment of obesity.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH403

PUBHLTH405 Social history of infectious disease

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Zelner, Jonathan
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: We will focus on five specific pathogens that have had an outsize impact on the trajectory of human health and societies: Cholera, Polio, Tuberculosis, Influenza, and HIV.
  • Course Goals: This course is meant to help students develop a broad perspective on infectious diseases. By the end of the term, students should be familiar with a broad array of infectious diseases and the differences in mechanisms of transmission between them. Students will also become familiar with the ways in which the biological underpinnings of disease - at both the host and pathogen level - intersect with the social and environmental conditions that often facilitate transmission. Students will also learn about key historical events in the history of infectious disease epidemiology, including the 1866 London Cholera Epidemic, the 1918 influenza pandemic, the discovery of the Polio vaccine (as well as the role of UM SPH in evaluating the efficacy of the vaccine), and the emergence of the HIV/AIDS pandemic.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Understand the concept of infectious disease "natural history" of infection. 2. Understand and enumerate key infectious diseases in human history. 3. Understand the key social and historical mechanisms underlying the emergence and transmission of infectious diseases.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH405

PUBHLTH406 Research Methods in Public Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Gamarel, Kristi
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course provides students with fundamental principles of research methodologies relevant to public health research. We will review a range of methodologies, including randomized controlled trials, observational studies, and mixed-method approaches. We will develop enhanced capacity to understand and critically appraise data from scientific studies.
  • Course Goals: This introductory course is designed for students interested in methodologies to (i) address social determinants of health and (ii) design or critique to address public health problems. This introductory course provides students with fundamental principles of research methodologies relevant to public health research. We will review a range of methodologies, including randomized controlled trials, non-randomized evaluations, observational studies, and mixed-method approaches to research. We will develop enhanced capacity to understand and critically appraise data from scientific studies, in order to be critical consumers of research and engaged participants in scientific discourse. Throughout the course, we will also emphasis ethical and cultural issues that underpin public health research. The overarching aim of the assigned readings, exams, assignments, and discussions is to empower you to think rigorously, systematically, and judiciously regarding how to appraise or conduct public health.
  • Competencies: Evidence-based Approaches to Public Health 1. Select quantitative and qualitative data collection methods appropriate for a given public health context 2. Interpret results of data analysis for public health research, policy or practice Planning & Management to Promote Health 3. Assess population needs, assets and capacities that affect communities' health 4. Apply awareness of cultural values and practices to the design or implementation of public health policies or programs 5. Select methods to evaluate public health programs Communication 6. Communicate audience-appropriate public health content, both in writing and through oral presentation 7. Describe the importance of cultural competence in communicating public health content Interprofessional Practice 8. Perform effectively on interprofessional teams
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Acquire a knowledge base of research methodologies used in public health research 2. Become a critical consumer of public health research and interventions 3. Explain the role of quantitative and qualitative methods and sciences in describing and assessing a population's health 4. Explain the critical importance of evidence in advancing public health knowledge 5. Apply methodological principles toward planning public health research
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH406

PUBHLTH407 Links between Infectious and Non-Communicable Diseases

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Yang, Zhenhua
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH370 (or equivalent)
  • Description: This course introduces the students to the etiology, pathogenesis, and the evolution of epidemiology of major infectious and non-communicable diseases. It discusses the links between major infectious and non-communicable diseases, including epidemiological evidence, the underlying mechanisms, and their public health implications.
  • Course Goals: The goals of this course are: 1) to introduce the students to the epidemiological transition of major human diseases, 2) to develop an appreciation for the convergence of infectious and non-communicable diseases in low and middle income countries and for the links between infectious and non-infectious diseases, and 3) to understand the public health challenges and implications of the infectious and non-communicable disease connections.
  • Competencies: The course concurrently addresses, partially or substantially, several Bachelor of Science (BS) in Public Health Sciences program requirements, including: -Gain an understanding of the natural history of infectious and chronic diseases, their environmental and biological origins, their distributions among populations, and strategies for their prevention and management. -Examine and explore multiple aspects of infectious and chronic diseases, including socio-economic, behavioral, biological, environmental, and structural factors that contribute to their origin and distribution among populations. -Understand the basic biology, transmission, and natural history of important human infectious and chronic diseases. -Examine methodologies that are used in public health to study the underlying causes and impact of various aspects of infectious and chronic diseases, including surveillance, epidemiological investigations, and mathematical modeling. -Explore multi-tiered public health strategies for the prevention, treatment, and potential eradication of infectious and chronic diseases.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Gain an understanding of the international statistical classification of diseases and related health problems. 2. Describe the etiology, history, pathogenesis, and evolution of major infectious and non-infectious diseases in different populations. 3. Review epidemiological evidence for links between major infectious and non-communicable diseases 4. Identify methodologies required for studying links between infectious and non-communicable diseases and for exploring the underlying mechanisms of such links. 5. Discuss the public health implications of epidemiological transitions of human diseases and the infectious and non-communicable disease links.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH407

PUBHLTH414 Population Approaches to Mental Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Ratliff, Briana Mezuk, Briana
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Overview of population mental health in the US context. Case-examples (autism, depression, substance use, etc.) will be used to illustrate social patterning, issues of nosology and measurement, and mental health treatment/services. Students will consider how social stigma impacts assessment and services for mental health conditions through readings the course project.
  • Course Goals: The goals of this course are: (1) to become familiar with the public health perspective on mental disorders and related behaviors; (2) to understand the ways in which social stigma impacts population mental health and healthcare; and (3) to appreciate the role of various stakeholders (e.g., epidemiologists, healthcare providers, policymakers, and community members) in addressing population mental health.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Become familiar with data and surveillance systems for population mental health in the US 2. Understand the role of social, biological, and environmental determinants of mental health 3. Discuss the role of social stigma in the assessment and treatment of mental disorders 4. Interact with various stakeholders in public mental health systems
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH414

PUBHLTH465 The Science of Medicine

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s):
  • Description: The class studies evidence-based medicine. It begins with a thorough review of study design, and then uses these skills to explore relevant issues to Public Health and medical practice. The first half of each class is interactive lecture; the second half is a flipped classroom with activity-based learning.
  • Course Goals: The goals of the class are: 1. Introduce students to the practice of Public Health and Medicine 2. Educate about study designs for Public Health and Medicine 3. Apply study design competencies to readings in Public Health and Medicine 4. Explore issues such as shared decision making, ethics, medical communication, and health disparities.
  • Competencies: At the conclusion of the class students will feel competent to navigate the health care system as a provider, consumer and informed citizen. They will be well positioned to seek future education in Public Health practice.
  • Learning Objectives: Students taking this course are expected to learn about: 1. Evidence-based medicine 2. The scientific underpinnings of diagnosis and treatment 3. The ethics of medical decision making; strategies for communication and special populations
  • This course is cross-listed with MEDPREP 470. Additionally Kinesiology and Biology are considering cross-listing. in the Medical school department.

PUBHLTH477 Readings in Public Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Youatt, Emily Staff
  • Description: Review of literature or directed readings on selected topic related to one or more areas of public health.
  • Course Goals: The goals of this course are to: 1. Introduce students to peer-reviewed literature in public health 2. Improve students' ability to locate, use, evaluate, and synthesize public health information
  • Competencies: None (see objectives and program learning domains)
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of the term, students should be able to find and appropriately interpret and critically evaluate the findings in peer-reviewed scientific literature.

PUBHLTH478 Practical Projects in Public Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff Youatt, Emily
  • Description: Practical projects allows undergraduate students to explore community-based public health settings. Project must be related to public health practice and developed in consultation with a faculty advisor. Students will write an integrative paper analyzing the organization's role in the public health system and critically reflecting on their experience.
  • Course Goals: To provide students an opportunity to engage with local-level public health professionals and organizations that engage in public health practice.
  • Competencies: None/see learning objectives and program domains
  • Learning Objectives: As part of this course students will consider the following concepts: 1. Health promotion at a population level 2. Community dynamics and the cultural context in which public health professionals work 3. Organizational structure and dynamics, including the organization's role in the public health system 4. How to operate professionally in a public health organization (including but not limited to: personal work ethic, professionalism, teamwork, and leadership)

PUBHLTH479 Independent Research in Public Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Youatt, Emily
  • Description: Students conduct independent research on a specific public health topic under the supervision of a public health faculty member.
  • Course Goals: The goals of this course are to: 1. Introduce undergraduate students to public health research; 2. Provide students an opportunity to gain experience conducting public health research; 3. Improve students' ability to communicate public health information in written form; 4. Improve students' ability to locate, use, evaluate, and synthesize public health information.
  • Competencies: Please see above course goals
  • Learning Objectives: After completing this course, students will: 1. Understand how to form a research question; 2. Be able to identify relevant literature or data sources to address a research question; 3. Better understand the role of data in understanding public health problems.

PUBHLTH481 Public Health Practice and Professionalism

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Youatt, Emily Staff
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH 200
  • Description: Students will apply their knowledge and skills to address current public health challenges. Professional development and engagement with public health agencies will prepare students to work in the field.
  • Course Goals: PUBHLTH 481 is an introduction to public health practice that will foster creative and systematic thinking through experiential learning that prepares students to work collaboratively with government agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and community partners, addressing current public health challenges.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of the course students should (be able to): 1. Explain what public health practice is and distinguish it from public health research; 2. Integrate knowledge with theory and practice to propose solutions to current public health challenges (esp. those that impact population health and contribute to health disparities); 3. Describe public health infrastructure, including the systems, competencies, frameworks, relationships, and resources that enable public health agencies to perform their core functions and essential services; 4. Assess community health needs, identifying key problems and assets, and create a conceptual framework that informs decision making; 5. Prioritize working with communities, agencies and other stakeholders in culturally appropriate ways; 6. Engage in cross-disciplinary, team-based discussion and project design; 7. Collect high quality data to analyze, evaluate and disseminate as public health information via appropriate channels; 8. Develop a strategy to promote health - from broad policy to direct intervention - that accounts for available resources, stakeholder interests, and community needs; 9. Describe a process for evaluation that assesses and improves the quality of a public health strategy and determines its effectiveness; 10. Exhibit professionalism and an ability to think critically while communicating and practicing public health; 11. Recognize the importance of public health work that is performed outside of an academic setting, and how learning in this context contributes to professional advancement in the field.

PUBHLTH508 Social Determinants of Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Caldwell, Cleo
  • Prerequisites: SPH MPH and SPH MHSA Residential Students Only or By Instructor Permission
  • Description: This course is designed to increase students' awareness, knowledge, and understanding of issues related to behavioral, psychological, and structural factors that contribute to understanding population health and health inequities. We will discuss key roles of health professionals in ensuring equitable treatment at multiple levels of influence to enhance population health and reduce health inequities through opportunities to practice skill building using case studies, deliberative dialogues and active listening strategies. This course will have a hybrid style (online & in-class) of instruction.
  • Course Goals: This course is designed to increase students' awareness, knowledge, and understanding of issues related to behavioral, psychological, and structural factors that contribute to understanding population health and health inequities. We will discuss key roles of health professionals in ensuring equitable treatment at multiple levels of influence to enhance population health and reduce health inequities through opportunities to practice skill building using case studies, deliberative dialogues and active listening strategies.
  • Competencies: Discuss the means by which structural bias, social inequities and racism undermine health and create challenges to achieving health equity at organizational, community and societal levels. Explain the social, political and economic determinants of health and how they contribute to population health and health inequalities. Explain behavioral and psychological factors that affect a population's health.
  • Learning Objectives: This course is designed to increase students' awareness, knowledge, and understanding of issues related to behavioral, psychological, and structural factors that contribute to understanding population health and health inequities. We will discuss key roles of health professionals in ensuring equitable treatment at multiple levels of influence to enhance population health and reduce health inequities through opportunities to practice skill building using case studies, deliberative dialogues and active listening strategies.

PUBHLTH509 Introduction to Qualitative Methods

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): King, Elizabeth
  • Prerequisites: SPH MPH and SPH MHSA Residential Students Only or By Instructor Permission
  • Description: This course is designed to provide an overview of qualitative research methods as commonly used in the field of public health. Students will learn about study design, data collection, and data analysis techniques. This course will have a hybrid style (online & in-class) of instruction.
  • Course Goals: Students will learn about the role of qualitative methods and sciences in describing and assessing a population's health.
  • Competencies: • Students will be able to select qualitative data collection methods appropriate for a given public health context • Students will be able to analyze qualitative data
  • Learning Objectives: Through this course: ? Students should be able to critically read and assess public health research that incorporates qualitative methods ? Students should be able to identify opportunities for and to correctly apply qualitative methods in public health research ? Students should learn different approaches of data collection and assess their suitability for a study design ? Students should develop basic skills in qualitative data analysis

PUBHLTH510 Communication Fundamentals

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Zikmund-Fisher, Brian
  • Prerequisites: SPH MPH and SPH MHSA Residential Students Only or By Instructor Permission
  • Description: This course will cover fundamental skills in how to communicate science and health information clearly to both scientific and non-scientific audiences. This course will primarily be online with periodic in-person meetings.
  • Course Goals: - Provide foundational skills in clear scientific writing and presentation - Convince students that communications should be intentional in design, purpose-driven, and audience-specific - Demonstrate that communication design is an iterative, feedback-driven process - Introduce concept of cultural humility in the context of communications
  • Competencies: CEPH Foundational C18. Select communication strategies for different audiences and sectors CEPH Foundational C19. Communicate audience-appropriate public health content, both in writing and through oral presentation CEPH Foundational C20. Describe the importance of cultural competence in communicating public health content.
  • Learning Objectives: - Students should gain skills in message prioritization, use of clear language, and narrative structures for science communication - Students should be able to identify and provide examples of the different ways that communications can fail to achieve their objectives, especially if cultural / contextual issues are not considered. - Students should build their self-efficacy in ability to communicate public health content in written and oral forms for relevant audiences - Students should be able to analyze how different communication modalities and formats might align with different situations, audiences, and goals.

PUBHLTH511 Nutrition and Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Peterson, Karen Leung, Cindy
  • Prerequisites: SPH MPH and SPH MHSA Residential Students Only or By Instructor Permission
  • Description: Introduce MPH students to important topics in nutrition and public health, program planning and program evaluation. PUBHLTH511 is an introductory course to nutrition research and will cover topics, such as healthful diet patterns, methods of dietary assessment, nutritional epidemiology, nutrition through the life cycle, and nutritional needs of diverse populations. This course will have a hybrid style (online & in-class) of instruction.
  • Course Goals: ? Students should be able to apply nutrition indicators for different public health purposes, including: estimating prevalence, monitoring and surveillance, and investigating diet and disease relationships, identifying atrisk individuals and groups, and evaluating programs. ? Students should be able to apply public health conceptual frameworks and nutrition research evidence to inform public health actions. ? Students should be able to use evidence-based knowledge to develop nutrition programs and interventions for diverse populations. ? Students should be able to develop appropriate designs to rigorously monitor and evaluate nutrition programs and policies in diverse contexts.
  • Competencies: Students will learn to assess population needs, assets and capacities that affect communities' health; apply awareness of cultural values and practices to the design or implementation of public health policies or programs; design a population-based policy, program, project or intervention, and select methods to evaluate public health programs.
  • Learning Objectives: Students will be able to: 1) apply nutrition indicators for different public health purposes, including: estimating prevalence, monitoring and surveillance, and investigating diet and disease relationships, identifying at-risk individuals and groups, and evaluating programs; 2) apply public health conceptual frameworks and nutrition research evidence to inform public health actions; 3) use evidence-based knowledge to develop nutrition programs and interventions for diverse populations; and 4) develop appropriate designs to rigorously monitor and evaluate nutrition programs and policies in diverse contexts.

PUBHLTH554 Applications in Global Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Rozek, Laura
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: School of Public Health Graduate Student
  • Description: This course is intended to serve as an introduction to the major issues of global public health through an investigation of global public health data sources and primary literature. Students will learn to aggregate available information convey public health data in a concise and meaningful format.

PUBHLTH610 Introduction to Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Colacino, Justin
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Description: This course is intended to serve as an introduction to the major issues of public health in the United States, although issues of global health will be considered as well. We will examine environmental, social and ethnic determinants of public health, and how they may be altered.
  • Course Goals: 1)Introduce the major issues of public health with a primary focus on public health 2)Discuss environmental, social and ethnic determinants of public health and prevention for chronic and infectious diseases. 3)Examine some of the key public health issues facing the U.S. and world, what determines them, and how they may be altered.
  • Competencies: 1. Students will be able to explain what public health is, what distinguishes it from other health sciences, and what unique contributions it has to make to the health of the public. 2. Students will be able to identify the principle determinants of health and disease, including the determinants of, and explanations for, inequalities in the health of groups differentiated by race, ethnicity, and economic status. 3. Students will understand when and why governments should intervene in matters pertaining to health of the public and when they should not. 4. Students will be able to identify the principle social and behavioral determinants of health and demonstrate how they influence the most important current behavior-related health problems. 5. Students will be able to identify the principle environmental determinants of health and describe the major environmental health issues of the present time. 6. Students will be able to identify critical issues in global health.

PUBHLTH626 Understanding and Improving the US Healthcare System

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Goold, Susan Bell Farris, Karen
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Provides an asynchronous, engaging, and interactive way to understand the U.S. healthcare system and gain insight about the system. This online course requires assigned course work and attendance a 90-minute in-person group session during weeks 4-5 of the course. Registration for group session is required early in the course.
  • Course Goals: This course provides students from a wide variety of academic backgrounds an asynchronous finding that medical students are far less confident about their health policy knowledge than their clinical preparation. The course developers have formulated the learning materials to be accessible and engaging for students from multiple different fields and levels of study.The course is designed to have a very favorable effort-to-learning ratio with engaging instructional material and high-yield suggested readings. Learning formats include:- didactic material (Week 1)- documentary-style archival material (Week 2)- in-depth expert interviews (Week 3)- simulation exercises (Week 4)- on-campus in-person discussion groups to engage in conversations about health  plan and health system design (Week 5)- an expert panel discussion of the future of healthcare in the US (Week 6).
  • Competencies: 1. Understand the main players (stakeholders) in the US healthcare system 2. Be able to identify examples of synergistic versus conflicting actions of the main players in the healthcare system 3. Expand their understanding of the history of healthcare reform in the United States.

PUBHLTH741 Interdisciplinary Problem Solving

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: "Interdisciplinary Problem Solving" is a course offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). Through a team-based, experiential, and interdisciplinary learning model, small groups of U-M graduate and professional students work with faculty to explore and offer solutions to emerging, complex problems.
  • Course Goals: Will vary term to term
  • Competencies: Will vary term to term
  • Learning Objectives: Will vary term to term
  • This course is cross-listed with LAW741/PUBPOL710/SW741 in the Law School, Public Policy, Social Work department.

PUBHLTH796 Special Topics in Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-5 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course will be used by faculty members to teach special or emerging topics related to Public Health. The specific material and format will vary by semester and instructor.
  • Course Goals: Will vary by topic and instructor.
  • Competencies: Will vary by topic and instructor.
  • Learning Objectives: Will vary by topic and instructor.