Winter Courses

BIOSTAT449 Topics In Biostatistics

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Statistics 401 or permission of instructor
  • Description: This course will make use of case studies to discuss problems and applications of biostatistics. Topics will include cohort and case control studies, survival analysis with applications in clinical trials, evaluation of diagnostic tests, and statistical genetics. The course will conclude with a survey of areas of current biostatistical research.
  • This course is cross-listed with Statistics 449 in the Literature, Science and the Arts department.

BIOSTAT502 Application of Regression Analysis to Public Health Studies

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Han, Peisong
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 501, 521 or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Biostat 502 will cover a general overview of linear, logistic, Poisson, and Cox regression. The course will use SPSS as the statistical software.

BIOSTAT512 Analyzing Longitudinal and Clustered Data Using Statistical Software

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Welch, Kathy
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 501 or 521
  • Description: Longitudinal data sets occur often in a Public Health setting. This course will introduce students to methods for analyzing both clustered and longitudinal data using the statistical software packages SAS and Stata. Models for both continuous and discrete (e.g., binary, count) outcomes will be discussed and illustrated. The course will have one session of lecture and one session of lab per week. The course will be driven primarily by using both software packages to analyze real data sets.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT512

BIOSTAT522 Biostatistical Analysis for Health-Related Studies

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Kim, Myra
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT521; BIOSTAT501 w/ instructors permission.
  • Description: A second course in applied biostatistical methods and data analysis. Concepts of data analysis and experimental design for health-related studies. Emphasis on categorical data analysis, multiple regression, analysis of variance and covariance.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT522

BIOSTAT578 Practical Projects

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: NONE
  • Description: Practical projects in consultation and statistical analysis of data in research studies with health investigators. Course requirements include an approved practical work experience related to Biostatistics in consultation with a faculty advisor. May be elected more than once. Enrollment limited to Biostatistics majors with at least two full terms of prior registration.

BIOSTAT602 Biostatistical Inference

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Sen, Ananda
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 601
  • Description: Fundamental theory that is the basis of inferential statistical procedures. Point and interval estimation, sufficient statistics, hypothesis testing, maximum likelihood estimates, confidence intervals, criteria for estimators, methods of constructing test and estimation procedures.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT602

BIOSTAT610 Readings in Biostatistics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s):
  • Prerequisites: One of Biostat 503, Biostat 524, Biostat 553 or Biostat 601/Biostat 602
  • Description: Independent study in a special topic under the guidance of a faculty member. May be elected more than once. Enrollment is limited to biostatistics majors.

BIOSTAT617 Theory and Methods of Sample Design (Soc 717 and Stat 580 and SurvMeth 617)

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Elliot, Michael
  • Prerequisites: Three or more courses in statistics, and preferably a course in methods of survey sampling
  • Description: Theory underlying sample designs and estimation procedures commonly used in survey practice.
  • This course is cross-listed with Stats 580 Soc 717 SurvMeth617 in the Rackham department.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT617

BIOSTAT646 High Throughput Molecular Genetic and Epigenetic Data Analysis

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Sartor, Maureen Tsoi, Alex
  • Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and STAT400, BIOSTAT522, or BIOSTAT521 or permission of instructor
  • Description: The course will cover statistical methods used to analyze data in experimental molecular biology. The course will primarily cover topics relating to gene expression data analysis, but other types of data such as genome sequence and epigenomics data that is sometimes analyzed in concert with expression data will also be covered.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT646

BIOSTAT651 Applied Statistics II: Extensions for Linear Regression

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): LI, Yun
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT601 and BIOSTAT650
  • Description: Introduction to maximum likelihood estimation; exponential family; proportion, count and rate data; generalized linear models; link function; logistic and Poisson regression; estimation; inference; deviance; diagnosis. The course will include application to real data.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT651

BIOSTAT664 Special Topics in Biostastics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Jiang, Hui
  • Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
  • Description: Master's level seminar designed to provide an extensive review of a number of substantive and methods and skill areas in biostatistics. Readings, discussion, and assignments are organized around issues of mutual interest to faculty and students. Reviews and reports on topics required in the areas selected. May be elected more than once.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT664

BIOSTAT665 Statistical Population Genetics

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Zoellner, Sebastian
  • Description: The first half of the course concentrates on classical population genetics. We introduce topics such as Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, models of selection for populations of infinite size and population subdivision. The second half of the course focuses on coalescent theory, covering migration, changes in population size and recombination. We provide guidelines how these models can be used in to infer population genetic parameters. Finally, some recent results and methods from the population genetic literature are discussed.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT665

BIOSTAT685 Elements of Nonparametric Statistics

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Nan, Bin
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 602 or STAT 511, and Biostat 650 or Perm. Instr
  • Description: First half covers theory and applications of rank and randomization tests: sampling and randomization models, randomization t-test, Wilcoxon rank sum and signed rank tests, Kruskal-Wallis test, asymptotic result under randomization, relative efficiency; second half covers theory and applications of nonparametric regression: smoothing methods, including kernel estimators, local linear regression, smoothing splines, and regression splines, methods for choosing the smoothing parameter, including unbiased risk estimation and cross-validation, introduction to additive models.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT685

BIOSTAT699 Analysis of Biostatistical Investigations

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mukherjee, Bhramar Sanchez, Brisa Braun, Thomas
  • Prerequisites: Registration for last term of studies to complete MS or MPH
  • Description: Identifying and solving design and data analysis problems using a wide range of biostatistical methods. Written and oral reports on intermediate and final results of case studies required.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT699

BIOSTAT800 Seminar in Biostatistics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 0.5 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Han, Peisong
  • Prerequisites: Graduate level Biostatistics students only
  • Description: Presentations and discussions of current consulting and research problems. Enrollment limited to biostatistics majors. Students must attend 2/3 of all seminars offered during the semester to receive credit. Maximum credit is 0.5 per semester. No more than 1 credit total allowed. May only be taken a maximum of 2 semesters.

BIOSTAT802 ADVANCED INFERENCE II

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Song, Peter Xuekun
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 601, Biostat 602, and MATH 451 or equivalent
  • Description: This sequence covers advanced topics in probability theory, theory of point estimation, theory of hypothesis testing, and related large sample theory. This sequence replaces STAT 610/611 as biostatistics Ph.D. requirements.
  • Course Goals: The goal of the sequence is to provide broad and deep theoretical training to Biostatistics Ph.D. students. Such training is essential for success in their thesis research and their future career.
  • Competencies: The following competencies under Appendix 2.6.c in ``University of Michigan School of Public Health Self-Study -- Appendices" for Biostatistics PhD students are met: 2. Statistical techniques a. Advanced Mathematical Statistics b. Generalized Linear and Mixed Models c. Advanced Biostatistical Inference d. Stochastic Processes j. Bioinformatics and analysis of high-throughput biological data k. Survival analysis m. Bayesian inference techniques n. Nonparametric statistical methods 3. Mathematical foundation The graduate must acquire mathematical proficiency to be able to pursue theoretical development of statistical methods to address the needs of Biostatistical Inference.

BIOSTAT820 Readings in Biostatistics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Students assigned special topics for literature study under guidance of individual faculty members. May be elected more than once. Enrollment limited to biostatistics majors.

BIOSTAT830 Advanced Topics in Biostatistics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Little, Roderick Han, Peisong
  • Prerequisites: course/instructor dependent
  • Description: Advanced training in biostatistical methods primarily for doctoral students. Format will include lectures, readings, presentations and discussions in an area of special interest to students and faculty, such as stopping rules and interim analysis in clinical trials, conditional and unconditional inference and ancillarity, or nonparametric regression.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT830

BIOSTAT875 Advanced Topics in Survival Analysis

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Nan, Bin
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 675
  • Description: Lectures and readings from the literature on advanced topics in survival analysis. Covers regression for censored data, general event-history data and models, competing risks. Statistical, mathematical, and probabilistic tools used in survival analysis are extended for these general problems.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT875

BIOSTAT880 Statistical Analysis With Missing Data

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s):
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 602 and 651, and at least one of Biostat 690, Biostat 851, Biostat 890, or Biostat 895 or Perm Inst.
  • Description: Statistical analysis of data sets with missing values. Pros and cons of standard methods such as complete-case analysis, imputation. Likelihood-based inference for common statistical problems, including regression, repeated-measures analysis, and contingency table analysis. Stochastic censoring models for nonrandom nonresponse. Computational tools include the EM algorithm, the Gibbs’ sampler, and multiple imputation.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT880

BIOSTAT885 Nonparametric Statistics

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Song, Peter Xuekun
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 601/602 or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Theory and techniques of nonparametrics and robustness. M-estimation, influence function, bootstrap, jackknife, generalized additive models, smoothing techniques, penalty functions, projection pursuit, CART.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT885

BIOSTAT990 Dissertation/Pre-Candidacy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: (1-8 Full term, 1-4 Half term)
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted to status as a candidate.

BIOSTAT995 Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Admission to Doctoral Program(1-8 Full term, 1-4 Half term)
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student who has been admitted to status as a candidate.

EHS504 Genes and the Environment

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Rozek, Laura
  • Last offered Winter 2017
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: None.
  • Description: In past years disease causation frequently was thought of as a "dichotomy" between genes ("nature") and the environment ("nurture"). More recently this view has been replaced with a more holistic perspective that emphasizes the importance of interactions between genes and environmental and/or occupational exposures. The focus of this course will be on interaction between genes and specific environmental and/or occupational exposures. The course will consist of detailed evaluation of specific examples of gene-exposure interaction (e.g., beryllium-related lung disease, peripheral neurotoxicity from organophosphate pesticides, bladder cancer and amine exposure) the underlying science of such examples, medical consequences, potential policy and social implications of current and future scientific knowledge, and review of current and pending legislation that address these issues. The course will meet for one two-hour session per week, and will be conducted in an advanced seminar-style format. Student will be expected to make presentations and lead discussion, in addition to presentations by faculty and outside guests. Student evaluations will be based on written reports, class participation and class presentation.

EHS510 Responsible Conduct in Research and Scholarship

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s):
  • Description: Responsible Conduct in Research and Scholarship --- This course provides training in 8 modules: (1) Research and Academic Misconduct; (2) Intellectual Property; (3) Responsible Authorship and Publications; (4) Human Subject Research and IRBs; (5) Animal Use and Care; (6) Mentor/Mentee Relationships; (7) Conflict of interest; and (8) Research and Scholarship in Society and the Global Marketplace.
  • Course Goals: The course has two primary goals: 1. To provide MPH, MS, and PhD students, as well as postdoctoral fellows, in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences with comprehensive training in the responsible conduct of research and scholarship. 2. To fulfill the NIH and NSF mandates for individual and institutional grant holders to trainall personnel supported by these awards in RCRS practices.
  • Competencies: To understand and follow the highest standards of integrity and professional conduct in eight key areas: 1. Research and Academic Misconduct - Fraud, Fabrication, and Plagiarism 2. Intellectual Property - Data Storage and Ownership 3. Responsible Authorship and Publications - Peer Review 4. Human Subjects Research and IRBs 5. Animal Use and Care - Laboratory Safety and Responsibilities 6. Mentor/Mentee Relationships 7. Conflict of Interest - Personal, Professional, and Financial 8. Research and Scholarship in Society and in the Global Workplace
  • Learning Objectives: Responsible Conduct in Research and Scholarship --- This course provides training in 8 modules: (1) Research and Academic Misconduct; (2) Intellectual Property; (3) Responsible Authorship and Publications; (4) Human Subject Research and IRBs; (5) Animal Use and Care; (6) Mentor/Mentee Relationships; (7) Conflict of interest; and (8) Research and Scholarship in Society and the Global Marketplace.

EHS540 Sustainability and Environmental Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Cole, Suzanne Jolliet, Olivier Batterman, Stuart
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course links environmental health and sustainability issues with the goal of developing sustainable strategies. It addresses environmental health determinants, underlying drivers and stressors, environmental metrics, exposures and impacts, assessment tools, and sustainable solutions. These concepts are applied to sustainable and healthy cities, transportation, food, energy, and consumer product systems.
  • Course Goals: 1. To understand the major risk factors that affect human and global environmental health. 2. To critically identify key drivers, stresses and health impacts associated with main domains of consumption and human activity. 3. To understand the analytical methods and underlying science used to evaluate sustainability, assess human health impacts, and contrast footprints (e.g., for carbon, water). 4. To be able to formulate the key principles leading towards sustainable and healthy solutions for the major domains of consumption and human activity.
  • Competencies: The proposed course will enable students: 1) To be able to identify major human health risk factors and their underlying causes, including environmental and nutritional determinant factors that impact human health status; 2) To be able to define, analyze and interpret principles of sustainable production and consumption in specific domains; 3) To be able to apply life cycle-based footprint tools and other metrics to quantify sustainability and health impact of products, organizations, and systems; and 4) To be able to define sustainability goals, interpret appropriate metrics, and apply problem-solving skills at organizational or corporate levels.
  • Learning Objectives: *This course contributes in particular to the following undergraduate competencies and program domains: a) Science of Exposure and Human Health: it explains the underlying sciences and relationship between sustainable consumption and human health, proposing environmental metrics, exposure and impact assessment tools, and addressing opportunities for preventing impacts and protecting health across the life course. b) Determinants of Health: This course describes the underlying drivers and stressors, as well as the environmental health and nutritional determinant factors that impact human health status. c) Problem Solving: Student will develop and apply problem-solving skills to develop sustainable solutions applicable to sustainable and healthy cities, transportation, food, energy, and consumer product systems.
  • This course is cross-listed with PUBHLTH 440 in the SPH undergraduate program department.

EHS556 Occupational Ergonomics

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Offered every other year
  • Last offered Winter 2017
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Description: Principles, concepts and procedures concerned with worker performance, health and safety. Topics include: biomechanics, job safety, anthropometry, work physiology, psychophysics, work stations, tools, work procedures, work standards, Musculoskeletal disorders, noise, vibration, heat stress and the analysis and design of work.

EHS576 Microbiology in Environmental Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Xi, Chuanwu
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Biology, Grad Standing or Perm. Instr.
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: GGraduate level course on basic knowledge about microbes in the environment and its impact on public health. Topics will include: - introduction on microbiology; - growth and control of microbes in the environment; - characterization and identification of microbes in the environment; - biofilms and its control; - transmission and persistence of health-related microbes in various environments such as water, air, food, indoor and industrial settings; - microbial transformation of organic and metal contaminants in the environments; - spread of antibiotic resistance in the environment.

EHS578 Practical Projects

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Practical Projects in the application of theory and principles of Environmental Health Sciences in public health settings. Course requirements include an approved practical work experience related to Environmental Health Sciences in consultation with a faculty advisor. May be elected more than once. Enrollment limited to Environmental Health Sciences majors with at least two full terms of prior registration.

EHS588 Environmental Law (SNRE 475)

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Introduces students to Environmental Law and the impact of the legal process on decisions that affect the environment. Topics include common law tort actions, toxic tort actions, statutory controls of pollution and other environmentally harmful activities. Additional areas include administrative agency structure and performance, Constitutional rights to environmental quality and more.

EHS603 Occupational and Environmental Disease

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Robins, Thomas
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course will focus on selected topics in occupational and environmental disease, including an understanding of causation and assessing the scientific literature. The goal will be to cover major toxins/exposures and also key organ systems and/or disease categories, reviewing conditions of historical significance as well as current relevance, all within the concepts and contexts of occupational and environmental epidemiology. Major health effects and disease categories to be covered include: lung diseases related to asbestos and other pneumoconiotic dusts; immunologic lung diseases such as asthma and hypersensitivity pneumonitis; illness caused by organic solvents and persistent organics; pesticide related diseases; occupational skin disease; occupational hearing loss; occupational infectious diseases; illness caused by metals such as lead, mercury, arsenic, and cadmium; environmental and occupational carcinogens; health effects of ionizing radiation including radon; health issues related to outdoor air pollution and indoor air quality including building related illness and mold; health effects of shift work and the built environment; issues of reproductive health; disparities in occupational and environmental health; and other selected topics.

EHS608 Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): O'Neill, Marie
  • Description: Introduces topics in environmental and occupational epidemiology, methods to evaluate health effects of exposures in environment and workplace, and policy and public health applications. Lectures cover key environmental and occupational epidemiology research; student-led discussions critique current literature. Students learn about scope, limitations, applications and future of environmental and occupational epidemiology.
  • This course is cross-listed with This course is already cross-listed with EPID 608. in the Epidemiology department.

EHS612 Biochemical and Molecular Toxicology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Harris, Craig
  • Prerequisites: Biol Chem 515 or equivalent, EHS 511
  • Description: The objective of this course is to provide an in-depth analysis of the biochemical and molecular pathways altered in cells and organisms through exposure to environmental and therapeutic chemicals. The content is directed toward the needs of doctoral and masters students in the basic biomedical sciences involved in laboratory research projects. Topics will cover areas of modern research emphasis and focus on how chemicals act to disturb cellular processes through interaction with cellular receptors, ion channels, transporters, signal transduction pathways, transcription factors, metabolic pathways, enzymes, cytoskeletal elements and other macromolecular targets. Specific information about the latest theories on the regulation and initiation of cell death, mediation of toxicity through hredox status and oxidative stress, mechanisms of carcinogenesis, genoxicity and immunotoxicology will also be discussed.

EHS614 Water and Global Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Xi, Chuanwu
  • Description: Poor water quality, insufficient quantity and inadequate access to water are among the most serious threats to human health worldwide. This course analyzes the historical and contemporary roles that water plays on global health. Key drivers that affect water quality and quantity (with linkages to human health impacts) are investigated, including agriculture, climate change, population growth and urbanization, natural resources, international trade, and regional conflicts. Both theoretical and practical methods are used to examine real world cases. A systems framework is used to develop sustainable and appropriate solutions that consider individual, social, technological, and institutional factors.
  • Course Goals: Described under learning objectives and competences.
  • Competencies: C1 - compare and contrast historic and modern water-related public health issues and trends from different areas of the world, with an emphasis on inequity and sustainability C2 - articulate how globalization of the world's economies, cultures, production systems, and policies converge and interact to affect water quality and quantity C3 - find, analyze, manage, and interpret science-based data from international and global resources that may be used to tackle key issues related to water supply, security, sanitation, and waste C4 - apply social ecology models to conceptually link ecosystem services and human well-being with respect to water, in consideration of economic, social, technological, and culture factors C5 - collaborate in multi-disciplinary teams and apply systems frameworks to address contemporary and complex environmental health issues via problem-solving and decision-making exercises C6 - propose and defend sustainable solutions to 'water and global health' at the societal-, organizational-, and individual-levels, and understand barriers to implementation C7 - develop and utilize logic models to link programmatic inputs, processes, and outputs, and evaluate the likelihood of success for programs designed to protect water resources
  • Learning Objectives: L1 - the historical role of water in shaping the growth and development of humans and societies L2 - similarities and differences of human health and disease issues across the world (e.g., developed versus developing nations, region X versus region Y) that are water-related L3 - how key drivers (e.g., population growth, agriculture, international trade, biodiversity, resource exploitation) exacerbate water supply, security, sanitation and waste L4 - the key biological, chemical, and physical stressors in water systems around the world L5 - systems approaches and how these may be used to tackle complex environmental health issues L6 -the roles of individuals, scientists, organizations (non-governmental, governmental), and nations in the management and sustainability of water resources L7 - sustainable solutions and evaluative schemes/metrics to 'water and global health' at the individual-, technological-, and institutional-levels

EHS617 Phytochemical Toxicology and Nutrition

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Harris, Craig
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course explores the science behind beneficial and deleterious effects of phytochemicals, the chemical agents produced by plants and which are found in the foods that we eat and the medicines we use to treat disease. We will focus on oxidants, antioxidants, and the properties of specific classes of phytochemicals.
  • Course Goals: Examine the chemistry of free radicals, oxidants, reducing agents, and the phenomenon known as "oxidative stress". Learn what an antioxidant is and what it isn't. Evaluate claims regarding antioxidant properties in disease prevention. Learn the mechanistic basis for anti-cancer, anti-inflammation, and other beneficial effects of phytochemicals Review the major classes of phytochemicals found in foods and learn how they provide their beneficial properties, as well as how they may elicit toxicity and cause various adverse outcomes.
  • Competencies: Students should be able to identify the major bioactive phytochemicals in foods and products and describe their basic properties. Understand the chemistry/biochemistry of reactive oxygen and be able to define "oxidative stress". Be able to describe what an antioxidant is and understand why many claims of antioxidant properties are false. Describe medicinal claims for phytochemicals based on sound scientific facts.
  • Learning Objectives: Learning Objectives: The students taking this class are expected to learn about: L1 the structure, metabolism, and utilization of triplet oxygen (O2), including the generation of reactive oxygen species (intermediate) L2 the proper definition, quantification, and application of "oxidative stress" as it applies to disease and toxicity (intermediate) L3 the true nature of "antioxidants" and be able to distinguish the differences between an "antioxidant" and an "antioxidant response" (intermediate) L4 the specific types and chemical characteristics of phytochemicals (chemical substances produced by plants) and where they are found (basic) L5 how to assess whether the beneficial effects ascribed to specific food and medicinal plants actually match up with their known chemical and biological effects (basic) L6 the different classes of unique phytochemicals produced by the plants we commonly eat and use
  • This course is cross-listed with in the The intent is to cross-list this course in the new Nutrition Department. I will be Phtyochemical Toxicology and Nutrition in EHS (EHS 617) and Phtyochemical Toxicology and Nutrition in NS (NUTR 617) department.

EHS624 Mechanisms of Neurotoxicology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Richardson, Rudy
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status, Biochemistry, Physiology
  • Description: Analysis and integration of scientific information to enhance understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms of neurotoxicity. Emphasis is on student discussion of theoretical and practical aspects of mechanistic studies based on assigned reading from the scientific literature.

EHS628 Toxicology Research Analysis and Presentation

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Richardson, Rudy
  • Prerequisites: EHS627
  • Description: Presentations of research topics from current literature by first year students. Advisors will assist in selection and preparation of materials for presentation. Course is designed to develop oral communication skills for presenting scientific material to peer groups. Presentations followed by discussion and questions.

EHS651 Occupational Health, Safety and Environmental Program Management

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2017
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Description: This course introduces future leaders of plant and corporate level occupational health, safety and environmental programs to the breadth of functions and activities routinely performed by OHSE managers. Among the topics discussed are: OHSE organization structure and staffing, management systems, program content and metrics, budgeting, risk management, incident investigation and management, emergency preparedness and response, regulatory compliance, legal systems, health and safety culture, and prevention through design processes.
  • Course Goals: Students who have taken this course are expected to achieve a set of learning objectives by acquiring knowledge about key concepts, principles, ideas and facts. In addition, they are expected to acquire a set of competencies reflecting skills relevant to the practice of occupational and environmental health. The following tables summarize these expectations.
  • Competencies: Describe the role and scope of OHSE programs (1) Implement OHSE audit programs and protocols, including conformance with ANSI Z10 and ISO 14000 requirements. (2) Develop and defend program budgets, and justify projects aimed at meeting OHSE objectives. (3) Write OHSE policies and action plans, and set measurable performance goals for organizations. (4) Understand and communicate effectively with insurance brokers and underwriters. (5) Participate effectively in workers compensation case management. (6) Conduct and evaluate basic accident/incident investigations. (7) Lead the development of simple emergency preparedness and response plans. 8) Describe regulatory processes and provide compliance advice to professionals outside of the OHSE domain. (9) Properly maintain an OSHA 300 log. (10) Describe basic legal proceedings and participate in lawsuit discovery processes. (11) Provide process leadership in product stewardship, prevention through design, and other engineering processes aimed at reducing hazard and liability exposures. (12) Identify factors affecting OHSE culture within an organization. (13) Develop a training matrix for an organization based on regulatory compliance and needs analysis. (14) Successfully manage a plant level OHSE program, or contribute significantly to the management of OHSE functions at the corporate level.
  • Learning Objectives: Students will gain a fundamental understanding of: (1) How OHSE programs are typically organized, the roles and responsibilities of OHSE managers, and expectations of other OHSE stakeholders in the organization. (2) Challenges associated with managing personnel and processes, including dealing with ethical issues, setting goals and measuring performance, hiring and training professionals, and managing consultants. (3) Financial aspects of program management, such as risk management and insurance, budgeting, workers compensation, and legal liability for both corporate activities and products. (4) Incident investigation and management, as well as emergency planning and response management. (5) Regulatory rulemaking, inspections, and compliance management processes.

EHS653 Environmental Sampling and Analysis Laboratory

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Zellers, Edward
  • Prerequisites: EHS 652 or permission of instructor
  • Description: Laboratory and lecture course on equipment, instrumentation, methodologies, and strategies for measuring environmental chemical and microbiological contaminants. A primary emphasis is placed on air monitoring for human exposure assessment in the workplace and general environment. Dermal, surface, soil, and water contamination measurements are also covered. Lectures, laboratories, and demonstrations. Primarily for students in environmental health sciences with interests in occupational and ambient-environmental exposure assessments for regulatory compliance and epidemiologic risk estimation.

EHS654 Control of Exposures to Airborne Contaminants

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Grubb, Greg
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Grad status
  • Description: Discussion of the principles of controlling airborne contaminants in working and living environments. It deals with general environmental and local exhaust ventilation for indoor spaces, filtration and emission control for the ambient environment, and personal respiratory protection. Specific topics include: basic properties of air and aerodynamics, and behavior of airborne contaminants; general dilution and local exhaust ventilation concepts, methods and design; fan performance and selection; air cleaning equipment; ventilation testing, OSHA and EPA standards, indoor air quality, and others.

EHS655 Human Exposure Analysis

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Neitzel, Richard
  • Prerequisites: Graduate standing
  • Description: Students taking this course will learn how to conduct statistical analyses of human exposures, and will apply these skills to a dataset containing exposure and health outcome data. They will also develop skills for understanding, interpreting, and communicating exposure information and for identifying and communicating evidence-based risk management recommendations.
  • Syllabus for EHS655

EHS657 Advanced Exposure Assessment

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Meeker, John
  • Prerequisites: EHS507, BIOSTAT503/equivalent, EPID503/equivalent
  • Description: The course will introduce classical, contemporary, and cutting-edge approaches to the estimation of human exposure to environmental and occupational agents as it relates to epidemiology studies as well as risk science, regulatory compliance, exposure source/route apportionment, and susceptibility factors. Qualitative and quantitative methods in exposure science will be covered, including surrogate measures, exposure modeling, and biological markers of exposure, in addition to statistical concepts such as exposure measurement error and efficient study design.

EHS660 Environmental Epigenetics and Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Dolinoy, Dana
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course examines principles and applications of epigenetics as they relate to human nutrition, environmental exposures and disease etiology, including mechanisms and policy implications. Case studies evaluate processes using animal and human examples drawn from the literature. Students will be introduced to laboratory methods and emerging technologies for examining epigenetics.
  • This course is cross-listed with NUTR 660 in the NUTR 660 department.
  • Syllabus for EHS660

EHS668 Professional Seminar in Occupational Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): O'Neill, Marie
  • Description: Seminars in contemporary occupational health topics and issues. Presentations by noted authorities from industry, labor organizations, governments, and academia.

EHS670 Applications in Environmental Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: EPID 601, EPID 655, EHS 656
  • Description: Students will complete an independent reseach project under faculty supervision. Students will apply epidemiological and statistical methods to the analysis of data from epidemiological, exposure assessment or laboratory studies. This course focuses on the conduct of independent research and sceintfic writing under faculty guidance. Course must be elected for 3 credits. This course is the final course of three, in which students plan their field experience (EHS 659), complete their field experience and present a poster to the department (EHS 600), then conduct data analyses and prepare a research report (EHS 670). It is part of the Capstone experience for Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Students.

EHS674 Environmental and Health Risk Modeling

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Jolliet, Olivier
  • Prerequisites: Good knowledge in calculus
  • Description: EHS 674 uses a hands-on approach to experiment and interpret modeling techniques applied to environmental health assessment. It first addresses steady-state multi-media modeling, exposure modeling, dermal uptake and pharmacokinetic modeling. It then expands the theory to dynamic modeling and Monte-Carlo approaches applied to probalistic risk assessment.
  • Course Goals: 1.To understand and apply multimedia models of fate and exposure as well as diagnostic tools to predict masses of contaminants in the environment, in order to evaluate the resulting exposures, impacts, and human health risks. 2.To apply and interpret Pharmacologically Based PharmacoKinetic (PBPK) models for risk assessment. 3.To test methods for the assessment of bacterial risks and the propagation of antibiotic resistance. 4.To introduce dynamic modeling, Monte Carlo simulations for probabilistic risk and uncertainty propagation in models.
  • Competencies: 1. To be able to use and interpret a parsimonious multi-media model and apply it to case studies. 2. To be able to assess dynamic behaviors in the environment and in humans, using PBPK models. 3. To be able to understand and critique modeling studies, including model evaluation and sensitivity and uncertainty analyses. 4. To be able to assess the development of antibiotic resistance.
  • Syllabus for EHS674

EHS675 Data Analysis for Environmental Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Park, Sung Kyun
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 560 and EPID 503 or 600
  • Description: This course will introduce non-parametric smoothing methods, such as splines, locally weighted polynomial regression (LOESS) and generalized additive models (GAM), and focus on continuous environmental exposure variables. It will also deal with analysis of correlated data, including longitudinal analysis and time-series analysis that are widely used in environmental epidemiology. It will provide an opportunity to analyze actual population data to learn how to model environmental epidemiologic data, and is designed particularly for students who pursue environmental epidemiologic research. The course will consist of lectures and hands-on practices in computer labs, homework assignments and final projects. R, a free software environment for statistical computing and graphics, will be used.
  • Syllabus for EHS675

EHS683 Air pollution and Global Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Dvonch, Tim
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Clean air is considered to be a basic requirement of human health and well-being. However, air pollution continues to pose a significant threat to health worldwide. This course covers air pollutants, their characterization, ambient concentrations, effects on human health and the environment, and international policy-making, guidelines, and governance.

EHS697 Readings

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr
  • Description: Supervised study/review of a selected topic in environmental health, occupational health, nutrition and/or toxicology. May be elected more than once for a maximum of six credits.

EHS698 Research

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Original research investigation of a special topic in environmental health, occupational health, nutrition and/or toxicology. May be elected more than once for a maximum of six credits.

EHS699 Master's Thesis

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm of Thesis Advisor
  • Description: This course shall be elected by students enrolled in Master’s degree programs that require a formal written thesis as a condition of program completion. The thesis shall be defended in front of the student’s thesis committee. The course grade will reflect the student’s accomplishments relative to the thesis and its defense. The course is to be elected only once.

EHS717 Toxicological Pathology Laboratory

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Bergin, Ingrid
  • Prerequisites: EHS 616 or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: This laboratory course will provide an introduction to the histopathology associated with chemical exposures. Students will perform routine histological maneuvers on tissues from rats treated with “unknown” chemicals. Following microscopic inspection of tissues, students will describe the pathological process produced in each tissue and will identify the class of (or specific) chemical to which the organism was exposed.

EHS796 Special Topics in Environmental Health Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Lecture, seminars and readings selected on a current or emerging topic or theme in the environmental health sciences. The specific material and format will vary by semester and instructor.

EHS874 Aerosol Chemistry Physics and Impacts

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Ault, Andrew
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: Aerosols have global implications for human health and climate, but are challenging to understand due to their complex physical and chemical properties that determine their behavior in the atmosphere. This course will explore be divided into three major sections: aerosol physics, aerosol chemistry, and aerosol impacts.
  • Course Goals: - Learn about how to describe particles and particle populations through different physical properties: particle diameters, concentrations, morphology, and size distributions - Describe particle motion under different flow regimes, such as turbulent or laminar, through the use of Reynolds numbers, Stokes' Law, electrical fields, and Brownian motion. - Explore processes that modify particle physical properties, including: condensation, evaporation, and coagulation. - Describe the chemical composition of aerosols and the sources, heterogeneous reactions, and other processes that modify aerosol composition. - Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of different characterization methods for aerosols, including: gravimetric analysis, electron microscopy, light scattering, mass spectrometry, and spectroscopy. - Explore the impacts of atmospheric particles on health through inhalation and climate through light scattering or cloud formation.
  • Competencies: - Develop the ability to interconvert between different types of particle diameter and utilize particle size distributions to describe particle populations. - Be able to mathematically solve for aerosol motion and losses in different types of flow. - Understand how to solve for particle modification in different chemical environments. - Gain the ability to make informed decisions about which characterization technique is appropriate for different applications. - Be able to explain the impacts of aerosols on health and climate and the benefits and challenges of different actions, such as regulation, to mitigate aerosol effects.

EHS899 Advanced Research

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Original investigations of a specific topic in environmental health, occupational health, nutrition and/or toxicology. Designed for doctoral students performing research prior to passing their qualifying exam. May be elected more than once.

EHS990 Dissertation/Pre-Candidacy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to status as candidate.

EHS995 Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students who have been admitted to status as candidate.

EPID299 Independent Research for Undergraduates

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Students do an independent microbiology research project under the supervision of afaculty member in the Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology program.
  • Course Goals: To teach students how to carry out scientific research in microbiology.
  • Competencies: Students are judged in how well they carry out their research projects, the effort they put into the process, and their grasp of the larger research goals.
  • Learning Objectives: Students learn both specific laboratory techniques and in general how to carryout independent research.

EPID399 Independent Research for Undergraduates

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr. and at least Junior status
  • Description: Students do an independent microbiology research project under the supervision of a faculty member in the Hospital & Molecular Epidemiology program.

EPID460 Introduction to Bacterial Pathogenesis

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Marrs, Carl F
  • Prerequisites: Introductory Microbiology and Genetics or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: This course covers the basics of the biochemistry, molecular biology, and genetics of chemotaxis and flagella, pili and adhesins, extracellular proteases, bacterial toxins, invasion and intracellular growth, phase and antigenic variation, gene transfer, LPS, iron, M-proteins, capsules, chemotherapy, antibiotic resistance and global regulation of virulence elements.
  • Syllabus for EPID460

EPID503 Strategies and Uses of Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Needham, Belinda Kardia, Sharon Adar, Sara Karvonen-Gutierrez, Carrie Mendes de Leon, Carlos
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 501 or Biostat 521, and Graduate Status
  • Description: This course offers an introduction to the principles, concepts, and methods of population-based epidemiologic research. It is intended to be the introductory course for students who are NOT majoring in Epidemiology. The course is divided into three primary sections: introduction to the basic principles of epidemiology and the measures used in epidemiology; epidemiologic study design and analysis;special topics that are important to an introductory understanding of epidemiology.
  • Syllabus for EPID503

EPID507 Microbial Control: Sterilization, Disinfection and Manipulation

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Rickard, Alex
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: The influence of microorganisms on human-health is significant and control strategies often rely on the use of physical (heat, UV, etc) and chemical (antimicrobial, antibiofilm, etc) technologies. This course will focus on such endeavors with particular focus on broad acting antimicrobials (less emphasis on antibiotics) and new/remerging microbial control technologies.
  • Course Goals: This course has three main goals: (1) Familiarize students with first-line methods to control populations of microorganisms. These methods will be in contrast to the use of antibiotics. First-line methods that will be described include physical and chemical treatment strategies such as heat and filter sterilization, disinfectants, mechanisms and use of broad acting biocides, as well as new emerging technologies such as quorum sensing inhibitors (2) Introduce the concept of multi-species biofilm communities, their recalcitrance and ability to enhance selection of antimicrobial resistance. (3) Discuss strategies that are or could be adopted to enhance microbial control strategies in the domestic, public and medical setting.
  • Competencies: 2. D. Human Physiology and Pathology Knowledge 1.The biochemical and cellular basis for normal and pathological functioning 2.Interaction among anatomical systems and organs in health and disease. 3.The most important chronic, infectious, and degenerative diseases of humans in terms of the public's health 4.Pathobiology of major diseases integrated with the principles of epidemiology. 5.The impact of host characteristics (e.g., immune response, nutrition, presence of other diseases or infections) on disease outcomes

EPID513 Vaccine in Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Yang, Zhenhua
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH370 or EPID512
  • Description: This course introduces essential vaccinology, covering pre-clinical vaccine development, clinical trials, new vaccine licensing, immunization program design and evaluation. It also introduces population transmission dynamics concepts, and the impact of pathogen and human population diversity on vaccination. Recent advancements in major types of non-infectious vaccines will also be discussed.
  • This course is cross-listed with PUBHLTH413 in the PUBHLTH413 department.

EPID516 Genomics in Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Smith, Jennifer
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Epid 503 or equivalent; Epid 515 or equivalent; Biostat 503 or equivalent
  • Description: This course relates genomics to the core public health discipline of epidemiology emphasizing the use of genomics to help describe disease frequency and distribution and to gain insights into biological etiologies. Topics include genetic material in disease, in families and in populations; the investigation of multifactorial traits; model-based linkage analysis; model-free linkage analysis; segregation analysis; allele association and linkage disequilibrium; and gene-gene interactions and gene-environment interactions. Issues related to implementing studies are considered.

EPID521 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems for Public Health Research

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Pearce, C. Leigh
  • Prerequisites: EPID600
  • Description: This course is a practical guide for how to use GIS in your work as a public health professional and will provide an understanding for why incorporating geography into study design is critical to the translation of research findings into effective health policy.
  • Course Goals: Students learn to: •Articulate the relationship between various geographies, community stakeholders and their relevance to study design and translational research • Describe the basic structure of spatial data • Identify and use available sources of GIS data •Gain an introductory comprehension of GIS data management, mapping and analysis •Gain proficiency with using ESRI's ArcGIS • Effectively use GIS products to communicate with stakeholders and translate research findings into health policy recommendations.
  • Competencies: Foundational Competencies: Policy in Public Health (Propose strategies to identify stakeholders and build coalitions and partnerships for influencing public health outcomes); Evidence-based Approaches to Public Health (Analyze quantitative and Qualitative data using biostatistics, Informatics, Computer-based programming and software, as appropriate).
  • Learning Objectives: Foundational Learning Objective: Explain the critical importance of evidence in advancing public health knowledge.

EPID525 Clinical and Diagnostic Microbiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Newton, Duane
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: At least 1 prior microbiology course or permission of the instructor
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course describes methods used by clinical and public health microbiologists to detect clinically relevant microorganisms in patient specimens, and how this information is used in patient management. Students will gain an understanding of processes by which microbiology data is generated and its relevance to clinicians and epidemiologists.

EPID545 Molecular Techniques Laboratory

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Martin, Emily
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Molecular techniques used in bacteriology and molecular epidemiology. Techniques covered include PCR, gel electophoresis, recombinant DNA technology, microarrays, and bacterial typing procedures.
  • Syllabus for EPID545

EPID546 Advanced Virology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 2-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: EPID 543 and EPID 545
  • Description: Advanced laboratory studies of viruses and virus diseases with emphasis upon the application of procedures to investigation. May be elected more than once.

EPID555 Globalization and Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Wilson, Mark L
  • Last offered Winter 2013
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Description: This seminar explores the diverse health impacts of economic, environmental, and cultural globalization. The transnational movement of people, technologies, capital, commodities, toxins, pathogens, ideologies and treatments are affecting people's well-being through diverse pathways. Introductory lectures and discussion of readings will explore various topics related to these issues. We will study the forces of globalization, beneficial and harmful health impacts, role in economic development and resource distribution, and implications for public health practice.
  • Syllabus for EPID555

EPID562 Advanced Bacteriology Laboratory

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 2-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: EPID 560 and EPID 561 or Perm. Instr.I
  • Description: Individual laboratory studies of selected topics on bacteria of public health importance. May be elected more than once.

EPID565 Research in Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Offered every year
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Investigation of a selected problem planned and carried out by each student. Pertinent literature, investigational approaches, and progress in the investigations are discussed in seminars. May be taken more than once for up to six credits. Usually taken first for one credit. This is the Capstone Course for Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology Students.

EPID578 Practical Projects in Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Fall 2016
  • Description: A period of elective (i.e., non-required) practical projects for international students in Epidemiology. Students work for at least eight weeks in an approved agency. Course requirements include this approved practical work experience related to the student's field of study plus prior and concurrent consultation with the student's faculty advisor. Restricted to Epidemiology majors with at least two full consecutive terms of enrollment.

EPID582 Molecular Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Martin, Emily
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: EPID 503 or EPID 600
  • Description: The rapid development in molecular techniques since the early 1980's has enhanced the ability of epidemiologists to define and measure both exposures and outcomes. In this course, we will explore the impact of these measures on the design, conduct and analysis of epidemiologic studies by examining successful and unsuccessful applications of these new measurement tools. We will also discuss the ethical issues arising from an enhanced ability to identify individuals with early stage of disease, increased susceptibility or to measure very low levels of exposure in the environment, and sensitize students to the potential conflicts in research ethics arising from collaborative research projects.

EPID602 EPID Methods II: Applied Epidemiologic Data Analysis

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Baylin, Ana
  • Last offered Fall 2016
  • Prerequisites: Epid 600; or permission of the instructor.
  • Description: A practicum in epidemiologic data analysis designed to integrate and apply concepts learned in previous biostatistics and epidemiologic methods courses. Students learn practical skills to analyze and interpret epidemiologic data with continuous and dichotomous outcome variables through lectures and hands-on exercises.

EPID603 Professional Development Seminar

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Pearce, C. Leigh
  • Description: EPID 603 is a two-semester seminar course to be taken by OEE, GE, and GHE students in the fall and winter semesters in year one. Students are exposed to various topics such as self-assessment, professional communication, responsible research, and career planning.

EPID604 Applications of Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
  • Description: Application of epidemiological methods and concepts to analysis of data from epidemiological, clinical or laboratory studies. Introduction to independent research and scientific writing under faculty guidance.
  • Syllabus for EPID604

EPID607 Communicable Diseases in Public Health Practice

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Power, Laura
  • Description: This course addresses the role of the infectious diseases epidemiologist in governmental public health, focusing on case definition development, notifiable disease reporting, immunization use, and surveillance. Students will learn the biology and epidemiology of important communicable diseases and will develop skills in outbreak investigations and public health response.

EPID608 Environmental Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): O'Neill, Marie
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Epid 600 or 503, Biostat 553 or 503
  • Description: This course will serve as an introduction to topics in environmental epidemiology, covering major areas of current inquiry in this field. It will convey the basic tools required to critically read the literature and to develop appropriate study designs in light of intended applications. The class meeting will include lectures and student-led discussions. This course will review epidemiologic methods used in evaluating the health effects of physical, biological and chemical agents in the environment and the available evidence on the health effects of such exposures. We will also consider policy and public health applications of the scientific evidence. Topics include lectures on methodology and major environmental exposures, discussions based on review and critiques of current literature, and presentations by outside experts on specific environmental epidemiology issues of current interest. After taking this course, students should have a better understanding of the scope, limitations, applications and future of environmental epidemiology.
  • This course is cross-listed with EHS/EPID 608 in the SPH Environmental Health Sciences department.

EPID609 Vaccines in Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Yang, Zhenhua
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: EHS 513 or equiv.
  • Description: Vaccines represent the most cost-effective medial intervention that has made a major effect on mortality reduction and population growth. This course will cover the epidemiological, statistical, biological, microbiologic, immunological principles, approaches and methods used in vaccine development and vaccination program design. Through a detailed discussion of the pathobiology, epidemiology, vaccine, and vaccination program design of a selected group of vaccine preventable diseases, the course will introduce the students to the major types of infectious diseases defined by the types of pathogens, the different transmission mechanisms of infectious diseases, the concept of population transmission dynamics, and the basic types of population effects of vaccination. Current issues and challenges in vaccine development and immunization practice will als be discussed.

EPID617 Social epidemiology II: Social and economic determinants of population health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Clarke, Philippa
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: EPID 514 or permission of instructor
  • Description: The objective of this course is to examine, in depth, some of the key social determinants of health in populations. The course is organized around substantive topic areas (e.g. obesity, disability, mental health, youth and substance abuse, stress and social support, neighborhoods and environments), with a focus on understanding the role of social factors in shaping health. The course draws heavily on epidemiologic perspectives and methods as tools to improve our understanding of population health, and is designed to expose students to different methodological approaches and their strengths/limitations in defining population health, understanding its determinants, and assessing the mechanisms by which these determinants influence population health. The course is a combination of lectures and student discussions, with an emphasis on class participation.

EPID621 Cancer Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mondul, Alison
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600, EPID 503, or PhD standing
  • Description: The course will review the socio-demographic magnitude of cancer, basic concepts of cancer biology and the causes of cancer. Methods for evaluating genetic factors, tobacco, alcohol, radiation, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, viruses and nutrition will be reviewed in lectures and by classroom discussion of selected publications.

EPID624 Readings in Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Review of literature on selected subjects under guidance of individual faculty members and through scheduled seminars at which reports are presented. May be elected more than once.

EPID625 Controversial topics in the role of nutrition on chronic disease

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Baylin, Ana
  • Last offered Fall 2016
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600 or EPID503 AND BIOSTAT 501 or BIOSTAT 521
  • Description: This public health-oriented course will provide students the opportunity to advance their knowledge in nutrition and chronic disease research from a population perspective and help them to better interpret epidemiologic studies on nutrition and chronic disease.
  • This course is cross-listed with EPID625/NUTR626 in the Epidemiology and Nutritional Sciences department.
  • Syllabus for EPID625

EPID626 Epidemiology, Health Services & Policy

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Morgenstern, Hal
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Description: This course deals with selected applications of epidemiologic methods and findings to public-health and clinical practice. Class topics include utilization and quality of medical care, health needs assessment, health impact estimation, evaluation and economic analysis of interventions, systematic reviews and meta analysis, risk assessment and health policy. The major objective is to provide a framework for integrating causal inference and decision making, thereby bridging the gap between science and practice. Emphasis is given to conceptual and methodologic issues that confront researchers, health planners, policy analysts, and decision makers.
  • Course Goals: 1. To provide a framework for integrating causal inference with decision making, thereby bridging the gap between science and both public-health and clinical practice. 2. To become familiar with different approaches for applying epidemiologic principles and methods to health-services, evaluative, and policy research. 3. To understand the barriers and challenges for translating epidemiologic findings into public policy.
  • Competencies: Following the completion of this course, the student will be able to perform the following activities at a basic level: collect relevant information and data to estimate the potential impact of a planned intervention on one or more health outcomes; design a study to evaluate the health effect and cost-effectiveness of an intervention in a target population; critique publications dealing with health-services, outcomes, or clinical research, based on sound scientific principles, and conduct a systematic review; and conduct an analysis of a policy that depends in part on epidemiologic evidence.
  • Learning Objectives: Following the completion of this course, the student will be able to do the following at a professional level expected in the workplace: describe the connections between epidemiologic and health-services research; describe and compare alternative approaches for identifying predictors of healthcare utilization; describe alternative methods and limitations for measuring the quality of care and comparing quality across patient, provider, or institutional populations; describe approaches for measuring the need for health services in populations; describe the counterfactual (potential outcomes) method for estimating the expected impact of a planned population intervention; describe and compare experimental, quasi-experimental, and observational methods for evaluating the impact of interventions on population health; describe and compare benefit-cost analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis; describe the components and problems of risk assessment; describe nontechnical aspects of risk evaluation including risk acceptability and perception; and describe barriers and challenges of translating empirical findings into public policy.

EPID634 Foundations in infectious disease transmission modeling

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Eisenberg, Joseph
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600, BIOSTATS 503, 553, or another course that provides a similar background in probability and statistics
  • Description: Infectious disease transmission modeling provides a theoretical framework for the field of infectious disease epidemiology; i.e., it provides a basis for thinking about study design, data analysis, and decision making. This course will serve as an introduction to infectious disease transmission modeling, teaching more quantitative concepts of disease transmission.

EPID636 Cancer Risk and Epidemiology Modeling

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Meza Rodriguez, Rafael
  • Last offered Fall 2015
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 560 or permission from the instructor
  • Description: This course will introduce 1) the concepts of multistage carcinogenesis and the analysis of cancer epidemiology using mathematical models of carcinogenesis; 2) the analysis of cancer prevention strategies using Markov cancer natural history models. Students will learn how to develop and fit multistage and cancer natural history models in R.

EPID637 Systems Modeling of Behavior, Social Processes and Chronic Disease

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Meza Rodriguez, Rafael
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Description: This advanced course provides in-depth coverage of applications of mathematical modeling to behavior, social processes, and chronic disease. We will review applications of agent-based and network modeling in social and behavioral science, and natural history models of chronic diseases. Students will learn to develop models in R, NetLogo, and NetworkX.

EPID641 Measurement Theory and Instrument Design

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mendes de Leon, Carlos
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600
  • Description: Measurement of Health-Related Risk Factors and Outcomes
  • Course Goals: To provide an introduction of measurement theory and applications of a variety of health-related risk factors and outcomes in epidemiologic research, and basic principles in the design of measurement instruments; to provide oral and written accounts of the results of the application and analysis of a specific measurement method;
  • Competencies: This course will allow students to attain the following Departmental MPH core competencies (List 1-10): 8.Be familiar with basic aspects of field methods in epidemiology (e.g. human subject protection, data collection and management, survey design, sampling strategies, calculating power, and public health surveillance). 9.Demonstrate effective communication of epidemiologic findings in written and oral formats.

EPID642 Sampling and Power

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Park, Sung Kyun
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600 (or equivalent), EPID 640 (or equivalent), and BIOSTAT 503 or 553 (or equivalent)
  • Description: This course introduces 1) various sampling methods (simple random sampling, stratified sampling, cluster sampling, convenience sampling, control sampling strategies in case-control design) and 2) power and sample size calculations. This course consists of lectures and hands-on exercises in computer labs, homework assignments, and a final project.
  • Course Goals: The goal of this course is to learn about how to design surveys with appropriate sampling methods widely used in epidemiologic research and how to compute sample sizes and/or powers given different epidemiologic study designs.
  • Competencies: After completing this class, students are expected to be able to attain the following competencies: Be familiar with basic aspects of field methods in epidemiology (e.g. human subject protection, data collection and management, survey design, sampling strategies, calculating power, and public health surveillance). Specifically, students will be able to: o Choose and design appropriate sampling methods for different epidemiologic study designs. o Compute sample size and/or power for different epidemiologic study designs.
  • Syllabus for EPID642

EPID651 Epidemiology and Public Health Management of Disasters

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2013
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Description: Introduction to the evolving role of public health and epidemiology in disaster preparedness and response. It uses epidemiological principles to develop skills relevant to disaster preparedness, planning and relief/recovery efforts. Students acquire skills to assess risk and evaluate impacts after disasters, and work on a local health department preparedness project.

EPID655 Epidemiologic Field Investigations in Infection Control

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Foxman, Betsy
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600 or equivalent, Epid 640, Biostat 503 or 553,EPID 600 or Perm. Instr.,EPID 600 or equivalent, Epid 640, Biostat 503 or 553,EPID 600 or Perm. Instr.,EPID 600 or equivalent, Epid 640, Biostat 501 or 521, EPID 600 or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Formulation of study goals, selection of epidemiologic parameters, sampling strategies, questionnaire design and administration, database construction, entry and validation, interpretation of univariate and bivariate results. Student groups design and execute a pilot field study.

EPID664 Field Methods in Epidemiology for Developing Countries

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Eisenberg, Joseph
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Epid 503 or Epid 600
  • Description: This course is for students and researchers interested in pursuing collaborative epidemiologic research in international settings. The course will focus on steps and procedures for setting up and conducting international epidemiologic studies. Topics will include relationship between research groups and host country policy makers and collaborators, cultural and logistical differences between research studies in the U.S. and international settings. Other topics will include developing and maintaining research infrastructure, research design, field operations, anticipated obstacles, monitoring, ethical and IRB requirement for international studies, funding, and plans for maintaining future collaborations. Occasional guest lecturers, actively involved in international epidemiologic research will be integrated into the syllabus.

EPID665 Research Seminar in International Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): O'Neill, Marie
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.; restricted to 2nd year Epidemiology International Health MPH students
  • Description: The seminar provides a forum for the discussion of capstone research projects in international health. Students in both the General Epidemiology and the Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology tracks of the International Health Program present their research findings. In addition, the seminar includes presentations of international health research by other speakers from the University and elsewhere.

EPID666 Health and Socioeconomic Development

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Stein, Howard
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Description: Reviews links between health conditions and socioeconomic development in low-income countries and trends in health and development indicators; socio-economic determinants of health, including poverty and income, education, nutrition, fertility, and culture and behavior; impact of globalization in terms of neo-liberal policies, trade and capital flows and the urbanization and their growth of the informal economy; examines the effects of health changes on economic growth and development.
  • This course is cross-listed with 662 in the CAAS department.

EPID674 Epidemiologic Data Analysis using R

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Park, Sung Kyun Bakulski, Kelly
  • Last offered Winter 2017
  • Prerequisites: EPID 503 or EPID 600 AND BIOSTAT 503 or BIOSTAT 553
  • Description: This course will introduce the R statistical programming language for epidemiologic data analysis. This course will focus on core basics of organizing, managing, and manipulating data; basic graphics in R; and descriptive methods and regression models widely used in epidemiology.
  • Course Goals: The overall goal of the course is to provide students with a set of new data analysis tools for Epidemiology using R.
  • Competencies: After completing this class, students are expected to be able to attain the following Epidemiology Department MPH competencies: • Be familiar with basic aspects of field methods in epidemiology (e.g. human subject protection, data collection and management, survey design, sampling strategies, calculating power, and public health surveillance) [Epid competency 8]. Specifically, students will be able to o Enter, manage, and manipulate data in R o Conduct basic data analysis in R o Graphically display quantitative data in R

EPID675 Data Analysis for Environmental Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Park, Sung Kyun
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 560 and EPID 503 or 600
  • Description: This course will introduce non-parametric smoothing methods, such as splines, locally weighted polynomial regression (LOESS) and generalized additive models (GAM), and focus on continuous environmental exposure variables. It will also deal with analysis of multi-level data including analyses of longitudinal data and complex sampling data, and time-series analysis that are widely used in environmental epidemiology. The course will cover how to handle limits of detection in environmental exposure data. It will provide an opportunity to analyze actual population data to learn how to model environmental epidemiologic data, and is designed particularly for students who pursue environmental epidemiologic research. The course will consist of lectures and hands-on practices in computer labs, homework assignments and final projects. R, a free software environment for statistical computing and graphics, will be used.
  • This course is cross-listed with EHS675 in the Environmental Health Sciences department.
  • Syllabus for EPID675

EPID679 Epidemiology of Psychiatric and Substance Use Disorders

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mezuk, Briana
  • Description: Introduces the epidemiology of psychiatric and substance use disorders. Addresses conceptual and methodological considerations in psychiatric research, descriptive and analytic epidemiology of common psychiatric and substance use disorders, and issues of classification and measurement for epidemiologic research. Students analyze epidemiologic data pertaining to psychiatric and substance use disorders.
  • Course Goals: The goal of this class is to learn the epidemiology for major psychiatric and substance use disorders over the life course, and to apply epidemiologic principles and methods to understand the predictors and consequences of psychiatric and substance use disorders.
  • Competencies: 1. Identify and describe population patterns of health-related risk factors and health-related outcomes in terms of person, place and time. 2. Be familiar with the current major public health issues and be able to identify and evaluate the determinants of these public health issues (e.g. demographic, pathophysiological, genetic, environmental, infectious, behavioral, and social). 3. Know the different epidemiologic study designs including the relative strengths and weaknesses of each, and be able to propose an appropriate design strategy when presented with a research question. 4. Demonstrate effective communication of epidemiologic findings in written and oral formats. 5. Be exposed to published epidemiologic studies and be able to critically appraise epidemiological findings.
  • Learning Objectives: Upon completing this course students will be able to: • Describe the epidemiology of the major psychiatric and substance use disorders of childhood, adulthood, and late adulthood • Understand epidemiologic methods used to assess psychiatric and substance use disorders in the community • Demonstrate the ability to critically assess epidemiologic data and scientific articles pertaining to psychiatric and substance use disorders • Demonstrate ability to obtain and analyze various epidemiologic data sources with information pertaining to psychiatric and substance use disorders • Prepare a scientific paper pertaining to epidemiology of psychiatric or substance use disorders • Improve public communication skills through class presentations and discussions

EPID680 Hospital Epidemiology I

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Yang, Zhenhua
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Description: The course provides an overview and essential knowledge in hospital epidemiology. It covers healthcare associated infection surveillance, prevention, and control, healthcare outcome assessment, and healthcare employee health promotion. The course also discusses important emerging issues in healthcare settings, which include antibiotics resistance, emerging infectious diseases, and biological disaster preparedness.

EPID684 Theory and applications of spatial epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Zelner, Jonathan
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 501 or BIOSTAT 521
  • Description: This course provides a survey of spatial problems in epidemiology with a specific focus on public health applications of spatial analysis. Topics covered will include the different types of spatial data, causal inference with spatial data, and specific examples of applications of spatial analysis to epidemiological problems.
  • Course Goals: This course is meant to introduce graduate students to the logic of spatial analysis in epidemiology and public health. By the end of the course, students will understand when spatial analysis is necessary, and common issues of causal inference with spatial data (e.g. ecological fallacies). Students will become familiar with the different ways spatial analysis is employed in different sub-fields of epidemiology and public health, ranging from chronic and infectious disease to mental and cognitive health and in the assessment of environmental exposure.
  • Competencies: 1. Apply systems thinking to a public health issue. 2. Discuss the means by which structural bias, social inequities and racism undermine health and create challenges to achieving health equity at organizational, community and societal levels.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Describe the circumstances when spatial analysis is necessary and useful for different types of epidemiological problems and contexts. 2. Understand and describe key issues of causal inference in spatial analysis (e.g. ecological and atomistic fallacies). 3. Become familiar with statistical concepts underlying spatial epidemiological analysis.

EPID804 Race and Ethnicity in Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Needham, Belinda
  • Prerequisites: EPID 503 or EPID 600
  • Description: Considers race and ethnicity as determinants of chronic diseases and premature mortality. Theoretical as well as methodologic issues in conducting epidemiologic research on race and ethnicity are emphasized. Designed for doctoral students who have prior familiarity with the basic principles and methods of social epidemiologic research.
  • Syllabus for EPID804

EPID806 History of Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Baylin, Ana
  • Last offered Winter 2014
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: EPID601 or similar
  • Description: This is a methodology course which focuses on the historical evolution of methods (e.g., study designs) and concepts (e.g., confounding, bias, interaction and causal inference) that constitute today's epidemiology. The course will also include a brief history of Public Health and history of the Department of Epidemiology at Michigan.
  • Course Goals: 1) Practice critical thinking of epidemiologic concepts and methods in historical context 2) Understand the historical evolution of epidemiologic methods
  • Competencies: This course addresses PhD competencies #1,2,3, and 9, and Master competencies #4,5,7,9, and 10

EPID813 Advanced seminar on public health and aging

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mendes de Leon, Carlos
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Doctoral standing at UM with training in research methods and statistics in relevant disciplines.
  • Description: This course provides advanced training in aging research pertaining to the public health and well-being of older adults. It will cover a variety of substantive and methodological areas in aging-related epidemiologic research and geriatrics. Selection of specific topics will in part depend on the interests of participating students.

EPID814 Topics in epidemiologic analysis

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Offered every year
  • Last offered Winter 2012
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: EPID601 BIOS560
  • Description: This pilot course will focus on selected theoretical and methodologic issues related to the analysis of epidemiologic data with the purpose of drawing causal inference. The topics covered will include long-standing fundamental issues as well as new techniques or novel epidemiologic applications of methods used in other disciplines. The course will consist of 14 three hour sessions. Each session will include a brief didactic presentation of the key issues for the session by the instructor followed by a structured small group and class discussion of a selected reading or readings.

EPID823 Advanced Topics in Cardiovascular Disease

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Lisabeth, Lynda
  • Prerequisites: EPID 601, BIOSTAT 523, BIOSTAT 560 or permission from instructor
  • Description: This course is for doctoral students with an interest in cardiovascular disease epidemiology (with a focus on stroke) and the epidemiologic methods used in this research area. Students will be exposed to major topics and issues in cardiovascular research and will gain experience with critical evaluation of the epidemiologic literature.
  • Course Goals: The goal of this course is to provide interested doctoral students with an opportunity to learn about cardiovascular epidemiology while providing them with an opportunity to apply their methodological training to critical evaluation of research in this area. Students taking this class are expected to learn about: 1) Pathophysiology of major forms of cardiovascular disease. 2) Methods for quantifying cardiovascular disease burden overall and in special populations. 3) Health disparities in cardiovascular disease and approaches to understanding their causes. 4) Risk factors for cardiovascular disease. 5) Translation of epidemiologic research in cardiovascular disease into clinical trials. 6) Clinical trials and evidence-based medicine. 7) Epidemiologic methods used in cardiovascular research.
  • Competencies: Critically evaluate and synthesize the scientific literature and develop new hypotheses to address gaps in our knowledge; Have a mastery of epidemiology study designs and be able to select a design that is appropriate to address a specific study question; Have a thorough understanding of causal inference, sources of bias, and methods to improve the validity of epidemiologic studies; Employ state-of-the-art statistical and other quantitative methods in the analysis of epidemiologic data; Demonstrate mastery in a substantive area of population health, and in this area integrate relevant biological, behavioral, and social mechanisms that operate at multiple levels of causation; Demonstrate excellent skills in the writing of scientific papers and grant applications; Provide clear and effective oral communications of epidemiologic concepts, methods, results, and implications to scientists, students, policy makers, and the public.

EPID824 Advanced Epidemiologic Methods

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Fleischer, Nancy
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: EPID601
  • Description: Advanced epidemiologic methods, with an emphasis on causality in epidemiologic research, theoretical considerations and interpretations of findings.
  • Course Goals: By the end of the course, the student will be able to: • Identify models, tools and strategies to strengthen causal inference in epidemiologic studies • Develop appropriate study designs in light of a specific research question, resources, population, time, and other characteristics • Analyze and evaluate observational epidemiologic studies with differing designs • Recognize and remediate issues of biases and validity in epidemiologic studies • Appreciate broader statistical concerns and alternative methods for epidemiologic research
  • Competencies: -Critically evaluate and synthesize the scientific literature and develop new hypotheses to address gaps in our knowledge -Have a mastery of epidemiology study designs and be able to select a design that is appropriate to address a specific study question -Have a thorough understanding of causal inference, sources of bias, and methods to improve the validity of epidemiologic studies -Design a research project that addresses an important population health or clinical question, using appropriate epidemiologic methods under constraints confronted in practice -Employ state-of-the-art statistical and other quantitative methods in the analysis of epidemiologic data -Provide clear and effective oral communications of epidemiologic concepts, methods, results, and implications to scientists, students, policy makers, and the public

EPID889 Responsible Conduct of Research and Scholarship Seminar

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Pearce, C. Leigh Villamor, Eduardo
  • Last offered Fall 2016
  • Description: This seminar will cover the Responsible Conduct of Research and Scholarship (RCRS) training for all incoming EPID PhD students and other individuals who are affiliated with a training grant. The seminar will also expose students to cutting-edge epidemiologic research topics through departmental talks by experts in the field as well as provide additional professional development training. RCRS is defined by National Institutes of Health as "the practice of scientific investigation [and academia] with integrity. It involves the awareness and application of established professional norms and ethical principles in the performance of all activities related to scientific research [and academia]."

EPID890 Doctoral Seminar in Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Fleischer, Nancy
  • Description: Doctoral seminar to provide guidance to new doctoral candidates as they write their prospectus, and to provide opportunities to practice the presentation modalities of epidemiology through seminars, poster sessions, and oral presentations.

EPID891 Advanced Readings in Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Students will review assigned readings on the epidemiology or natural history of specific infections or chronic diseases or on host or environmental factors associated with disease, or on epidemiological methods and their application. May be elected more than once

EPID970 Pre-candidacy research in Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: Doctoral Student in Epidemiology Standing
  • Description: Original investigations in the various fields of Epidemiology as part of the student's preparation for their dissertation research and writing.

EPID990 Dissertation Research/Pre-Candidate

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Description: For students who have NOT reached candidacy yet.

EPID995 Dissertation Research/Candidate

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student who has been admitted to status as a candidate

HBEHED578 Practical Projects

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Practical projects in the application of theory and principles of Health Behavior and Health Education to individual and community-based public health settings. Course requirements include an approved practical project related to Health Behavior and Health Education in consultation with a faculty advisor. THE EXPERIENCE IS REPORTED IN AN INTEGRATIVE PAPER DEMONSTRATING THE SCIENTIFIC APPLICATION OF HBHE THEORIES AND PRINCIPLES TO THE PRACTICAL PROJECT. May be elected more than once. Enrollment limited to Health Behavior and Health Education majors with at least two full terms of prior registration.

HBEHED605 Human Sexuality across the Life Course

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Gamarel, Kristi
  • Description: This course is designed to provide students with an introduction of the major theories and principles guiding human sexuality as well as recent developments in sexuality health research; develop their understanding of methodological and assessment issues in the study of sexuality; and familiarize them with the extent to which sexuality research and principles inform public health efforts promoting sexual health. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and critically assess: (1) major concepts, theories and perspectives guiding a multidisciplinary understanding of human sexuality; (2) recent developments in sexuality research; (3) methodological aspects in the study of sexuality; and (4) how sexuality research informs public health practice and sexual health education strategies.
  • Course Goals: This course is designed as an introductory course in human sexuality. Throughout the term, students will learn the major theories and principles guiding an understanding of human sexuality as well as recent developments in sexuality research; develop an understanding of methodological and assessment issues in the study of sexuality; and apply sexuality research and principles to inform public health efforts. This knowledge is considered critical to the development of effective public health behavior and education programs focused on sexual health.
  • Competencies: This course addresses HBHE Competency #1: Describe the role and interaction of key determinants of health status, health behavior, and health behavior change from a biopsychosocial perspective across the lifespan. Through assignments and their final project, students will be expected to: (a) describe the epidemiology of a sexual health problem; (b) identify its biological, behavioral, social and educational aspects; and (c)review, select, and apply theoretical constructs for predicting and changing a health behavior related to their outcome of interest. This course also addresses Competency #4 (Describe and apply ethical principles relevant to public health research and practice) and Competency #6 (Describe and apply the knowledge and skills necessary to interact with diverse individuals and communities). Given the diversity of populations represented in the course, as well as the sensitivity of the sexual health topics addressed in class, students will be encouraged to value sexual diversity, and describe how empirical research and evidence-based practice addresses ethical issues related to the promotion of the public's sexual health and to the practice of sexual health education as a profession. Through active class participation and the facilitation of course readings, these conversations will serve to develop students' perspectives on their professional rights, obligations, and role as a sexual health educators.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of the course, students will be able to identify and critically assess: 1. Major concepts, theories and perspectives guiding a multidisciplinary understanding of human sexuality across the life course; 2. Recent developments in sexuality research; 3. Methodological aspects in the study of sexuality; 4. How sexuality research informs public health practice and how sexual health is promoted in health education strategies.

HBEHED614 Women's Health and the Timing of Reproduction

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Geronimus, Arline T
  • Offered every other year
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Applies a systems perspective to examine the personal, social, and cultural factors that influence the age at which women initiate childbearing and the implications of these factors for the health of women and infants. Topics include teenage childbearing, Black American fertility patterns, infant mortality, ethnographic and other research methods, and related policy issues. Reviews current, historical, and cross-cultural examples. Students apply course concepts and methodologies to specific research and policy questions.

HBEHED615 Sexual Health Promotion

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Harper, Gary
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course will provide students with the background, knowledge, and experience needed to create different types of sexual health promotion interventions for diverse populations in multiple setting. Students will explore socio-ecological factors that influence the sexual health of diverse populations, and learn how to develop/implement theory-based and culturally-appropriate interventions.

HBEHED621 Seminar in Behavioral Research Methods in Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Amico, K. Rivet
  • Offered every year
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: HBHE 620 or equiv.
  • Description: Intensive analysis of selected topics; characteristics and advantages of alternative types of studies; purposes of various experimental designs; development of methodology for program evaluation; interviewing and questionnaire construction and problems in analysis of data, with particular emphasis on problems of spuriousness

HBEHED624 Needs Assessment Methods for Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mehdipanah, Roshanak
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course will cover a mixed-methods approach to conducting needs assessments; including collection of primary data (e.g. surveys, focus groups, and interviews) and secondary data (e.g. agency, state statistics, and census). Furthermore, a global perspective will be used to study various international efforts using health equity needs assessments.

HBEHED625 Research in Health Behavior

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Inst.
  • Description: Individual work on a problem in the area of health behavior relevant to program effectiveness in public health, under the tutorial guidance of an appropriate staff member. Regular conferences are arranged to discuss research designs, proposed problem solutions, methods for data collection and analysis. The investigation is reported in a paper, which may be submitted for publication. May be elected more than once.

HBEHED626 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Health Behaviors

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mistry, Ritesh
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: None.
  • Description: GIS offer useful tools for collecting, mapping and analyzing health data. The course focuses on how to use GIS to understand the geography of health, health behaviors, and health disparities. Students will learn to use ESRI's ArcGIS for introductory data management, mapping and geographic data analysis.
  • Course Goals: The course teaches students how to use GIS to understand the geography of health, health behaviors, and health disparities. Student learn to: •Articulate the role of GIS in public health • Describe the basic structure of spatial data Identify and use available major sources of GIS health data •Know the basics of managing GIS health data •Gain an introductory comprehension of GIS data management, mapping and analysis •Gain proficiency with using ESRI's ArcGIS •Use GIS to understand and find solutions for public health problems •Effectively use GIS products to communicate with stakeholders
  • Competencies: HBHE Competencies Addressed by This Course: Competency 1: Describe the role and interaction of key determinants of health status from a social-ecological perspective (e.g. individual, family, organization, community, and society). Competency 4: Apply basic principles of research and evaluation methodology relevant to understanding and modifying health status and health behavior from a social ecological perspective (e.g. individual, family, community, and society) within and across settings and countries with varying levels of economic resources.

HBEHED629 Families and Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Chatters, Linda
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Description: This course will examine families as a primary context for understanding health and health-related behaviors. Major topics include: 1) models and theories of the family, 2) history and current status of family-based practice, 3) the impact of demographic trends and their impact on family structure and functioning, 4) family diversity with respect to social status groups, ethnicity, and culture and their implications for understanding health phenomena, 5) families as the context for socialization to health beliefs and practices, 6) the provision of family-based care, and 7) health profiles of family members and their family roles.
  • This course is cross-listed with HB727 (School of Social Work) in the School of Social Work department.

HBEHED630 Aging and Health Behavior

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Connell, Cathleen
  • Offered every year
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: Graduate standing
  • Description: This course provides an overview of trends in aging and health with a particular focus on health behaviors and health promotion. Age-related changes in health and health behavior and the impact of societal and personal attitudes toward aging on health behaviors will be discussed. Successful aging, an emerging paradigm for gerontology, will frame discussion of strategies for facilitating optimal health behaviors among older adults. Current recommendations and practices and multi-level interventions will be presented for physical activity, smoking, obesity, weight management, nutrition education, immunizations, and cancer screenings. Recent evidence of the impact of health behaviors on brain health and the prevention of cognitive decline will be discussed.

HBEHED631 Budget Practices for Public Health Programs

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Friedman Milanovich, Amy
  • Prerequisites: Prior completion of HBHE651 Program Development in Health Education
  • Description: Budget Practices for Public Health Programs is a series of 13 two-hour sessions which provides an introduction to budgeting relevant to managing public health programs. Students will learn basic principles and strategies of program and organizational budgeting, and will gain practical experience building and managing budgets.

HBEHED633 Social Networks and Social Support in Health Education

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Caldwell, Cleo
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr. and Grad Status
  • Description: Review and analysis of theory and empirical evidence concerning social networks and social support and their relationship to health status and health behavior. Examines utilization of social networks in health education programs, e.g., family network interventions, self-help groups, "natural helpers", community organizing.

HBEHED638 Qualitative Methods in Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): King, Elizabeth
  • Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor
  • Description: This is a course about doing qualitative social research in public health. One of its major goals is very practical and down to earth: acquiring the strategies and techniques needed to conduct qualitative research on human behavior. But the course also aspires to understand the philosophical, ethical, and political issues involved in the practice of social science within public health. The course will focus upon five phases of the research process: l) pre-research dilemmas and decisions, 2) theory and the formulation of the research question or hypothesis, 3) design, sampling, and data collection, 4) stages of data analysis, and 5) the implications of qualitative knowledge for representation of "subjects" and the expression of this knowledge in the form of written reports or publications.

HBEHED641 Materials and Methods in Health Education Programs

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Patel, Minal
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: The goal of this course is to enable participants to select and use learning materials and methods in health education programs. The course consists of in-class sessions where various materials and media are demonstrated and their utility as enhancements to learning discussed. Technical and production aspects of materials and media are considered in several lab sessions. Students are required to produce health education materials or develop learning activities through fieldwork in addition to in-class and lab sessions.

HBEHED644 Readings in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Review of literature on selected topics in health behavior, health education or related areas under guidance of faculty member. Critical analysis; written and oral reports. May be taken more than once for a total not to exceed 6 credit hours.

HBEHED651 Program Development in Health Education

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Fleming, Paul
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Focuses on design of effective health promotion/health education programs. Moves between theoretical bases for program development and examination of practical applications. Initial sessions focus on framework for development of health education/health promotion programs. Subsequent sessions center on specific components of program design and application, as well as evaluation.

HBEHED652 Group Process in Health Education

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Israel, Barbara
  • Offered every other year
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Examines concepts, theories, and research in the field of group dynamics with particular application to health education. Emphasis on developing skills for observing, assessing, participating in, facilitating and evaluating small groups.

HBEHED653 Evidence-Informed Decision Making for 21st Century Health Care

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Veinot, Tiffany
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Description: Health consumers now have unprecedented access to health information, from published research to consumer health websites to electronic health records to peer narratives. Yet, consumers face challenges in acquiring, assessing and using health information. There is a growing need for professionals to support consumers in navigating the sea of information.
  • Course Goals: Health care consumers/patients now have unprecedented access to health information, from published research to consumer health websites to electronic health records to peer narratives. At the same time, health care and disease management is increasingly moving from formal institutions to homes and communities. Nevertheless, consumers/patients also face tremendous challenges in acquiring, assessing and using health information. There is a growing need for professionals to support health care consumers/patients in their efforts to effectively navigate this sea of information. In this course, students learn how to apply an information perspective to health-related decisions faced by consumers/patients in the digital era. Students learn how to search health sciences research literature using a range of reference, bibliographic and pre-filtered ("evidence-based") sources. They also learn to apply evidence assessment techniques, including critical appraisal methods, to the health sciences literature. Students learn how to apply basic methods of research synthesis to health-related questions, and evaluate strategies for personalizing evidence for consumers/patients. Students will also apply the skills needed to train and support consumers/patients in effectively using key health sciences resources. LEARNING OBJECTIVES •Summarize, analyze and evaluate key features of a range of health sciences information sources. •Implement effective searches for health sciences information, and successfully evaluate search results. •Generate and implement training in optimal use of health information sources. • Critically appraise published health research. • Apply basic methods of research synthesis to health-related questions. • Evaluate strategies for personalizing evidence for consumers/patients.
  • Competencies: The course directly supports the following HBHE competency: 3) Apply basic principles of research and evaluation methodology relevant to understanding and modifying health status and health behavior While relevant to all sub-competencies within 3), the course is particularly targeted towards: e. Critique and synthesize scientific evidence, including evidence review and f. Translate research findings into public health practice, including dissemination of proven interventions
  • This course is cross-listed with SI 653.

HBEHED654 Consumer Health Informatics

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Veinot, Tiffany
  • Description: Consumer health informatics (CHI) gives health care consumers information and tools to facilitate their engagement. Students will become familiar with, and evaluate, a range of CHI applications. They will also assess the needs and technological practices of potential users, generate theory-informed design and implementation strategies, and select appropriate evaluation approaches.
  • Course Goals: LEARNING OBJECTIVES 1. Compare and evaluate a range of consumer health informatics (CHI) applications. 2. Generate CHI design and implementation principles and guidelines that incorporate theories from the behavioral, social and environmental sciences. 3. Assess consumers' health-related needs, resources and technology-oriented practices, and evaluate their implications for CHI applications. 4. Plan the design, implementation and evaluation of a new, theory-informed CHI application to address the health need(s) of a particular audience. 5. Develop a commitment to CHI practice with diverse user groups.
  • Competencies: 2. Describe and apply relevant theories, concepts, and models from social and behavior science that are used in public health research and practice to both understand and affect health status, health behavior, social change, and policy. f) Understand the merits of using theory to inform interventions and their evaluation in public health. 4. Apply basic principles of research and evaluation methodology relevant to understanding and modifying health status and health behavior from a social ecological perspective (e.g. individual, family, community, and society) within and across settings and countries with varying levels of economic resources. c) Understand and appropriately apply the major types of evaluation (e.g. formative, outcome, process). 5. Plan, implement, and manage health education and health promotion programs across diverse settings and populations from a social-ecological perspective within and across settings and countries with varying levels of economic resources. a) Identify, explain, and apply the appropriate intervention strategy (e.g. policy advocacy, mass media, community organizing, social marketing, one on one counseling) to specific health problems and conditions. b) Identify, explain, and apply the appropriate level of intervention (e.g. individual, family, community, policy). c) Apply evidence-based approaches to the development and evaluation of public health programs. 6. Describe and apply the knowledge and skills necessary to interact with diverse individuals and communities within and across settings and countries with varying levels of economic resources. d) Design, implement, and evaluate culturally appropriate interventions for diverse individuals and communities.
  • This course is cross-listed with SI554.

HBEHED659 Introduction to Adolescent Substance Use Prevention

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mistry, Ritesh
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Students gain an overview of adolescent substance use prevention from a public health perspective. Students learn about the evidence-base on adolescent substance use prevention. They apply course content to create prevention interventions. The course examines both illicit (e.g., opiates, marijuana, methamphetamine) and licit (e.g., alcohol, tobacco) substances.
  • Course Goals: The goal of the course is to provide students with information about adolescent substance use, its consequences, and current evidence-based intervention, and to give them skills to develop or adapt an intervention to address adolescent substance in a specific population.
  • Competencies: HBHE Competency 5. Plan, implement and manage health education and health promotion programs across diverse settings and populations from a social-ecological perspective within and across settings and countries with varying levels of economic resources. a. Identify, explain, and apply the appropriate intervention strategy (e.g. policy advocacy, mass media, community organizing, social marketing, one on one counseling) to specific health problems and conditions. b. Identify, explain, and apply the appropriate level of intervention (e.g. individual, family, community, policy). c. Apply evidence-based approaches to the development and evaluation of public health programs. d. Describe the key elements of an effective grant proposal. CEPH Foundational Competency 9. Design a population-based policy, program, project or intervention
  • Learning Objectives: • Understand the magnitude of and trends in adolescent substance use in the US and globally. • Describe which adolescent populations are at greatest risk of substance use and its consequences. • Describe the consequences of adolescent substance use on adolescent health and development. • Understand and critically appraise the main theoretical perspectives that are used to explain what determines adolescent substance use, and progression in to abuse. • Articulate the empirical evidence about the determinants of adolescent substance use. • Identify and appraise existing programs and policies designed to prevent adolescent substance use. • Apply the above to develop a new or adapt an existing evidence-based program or policy to prevent adolescent substance use.

HBEHED660 Theory, Research and Practice in Adolescent Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Caldwell, Cleo
  • Offered every other year
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Description: Examines educational efforts designed to promote better health outcomes among adolescents. Review developmental theories, research, and interventions to promote health in this population. Addresses various contexts for intervention programs and their implications. Topics covered include, but are not limited to, the effects of peer and family influences on health, resiliency, violence, alcohol and drug use, and sexual behavior.

HBEHED661 Designing Sticky Communications for Health Advocacy, Education, and Mass Media

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Zikmund-Fisher, Brian
  • Description: This class focuses on broadly applicable message design principles that help health education and promotion messages to "stick" in recipients' minds. In addition to deconstructing memorable messages at a basic level, we will also consider the potential uses (and misuses) of first person narratives.

HBEHED663 The Use of Brief Interventions to Help People Change Health Behaviors: Evidence-Based Strategies for Work in Clinical and Community Settings

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Piette, John
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: N/A
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course gives students an understanding of how brief interventions are used to impact health behaviors and the approaches used to help people make and attain behavior-change goals. Students also gain skills in applying scientific evidence from randomized trials and systematic reviews in public health decision-making.
  • Course Goals: 1) Know what brief behavioral interventions are and how they are delivered to address behavioral challenges 2) Know where to look for evidence supporting the effectiveness of brief interventions 3) Be able to review, interpret, and apply evidence from randomized trials, systematic reviews, and guidelines 4) Understand what types of brief interventions have the strongest evidence and for whom they work
  • Competencies: a) Identify theories, concepts and models from a range of social and behavior science disciplines that are used in public health research and practice involving multiple levels of change (e.g., individual, family, organization, community, and society). b) Describe overlap between current models and frameworks, and their limitations c) Describe how theory is useful in understanding why individuals do or do not engage in health behaviors. d) Understand the merits of using theory to inform interventions and their evaluation in public health. e) Describe some of the benefits and challenges of using social and behavioral theories and models to inform programs and policies involving multiple levels of change (e.g. individual, family, organization, community). f)Describe key adaptations and challenges in applying theories and frameworks to conduct public health research and practice across cultures and in resource poor settings.

HBEHED665 Mobile Health: Text messaging, apps, and other mobile communication strategies to prevent disease and assist people living with chronic illnesses

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Piette, John
  • Prerequisites: N/A
  • Description: The overall goal of this course is to give students the knowledge, skills and experience they need to participate in decision-making about developing, implementing, and continuing mHealth services addressing major public health and healthcare challenges.
  • Course Goals: The course has two aims: First, to give students an understanding of how mHealth tools and programs are used to impact health behaviors in a range of important areas, including chronic disease management, mental health and substance abuse prevention and treatment, and global health. Students will learn about the challenges to behavior change as well as the factors that impact mHealth program design and sustainability. As part of that process students will sharpen their skills in finding, interpreting, and applying scientific evidence about mHealth programs. We will discuss where evidence can be found, and we will critique specific randomized trials and systematic reviews. Second, students will gain hands-on experience in developing, deploying, and evaluating an mHealth program via a series of exercises using a "real world" mHealth communication tool. That experience coupled with the more didactic presentation of the field will prepare students to design a hypothetical mHealth campaign addressing the public health challenge of their choice, specifying issues such as: the communication channels employed (texting, automated calls, apps, special sensors), content development, recruitment in the target population, data security, and program evaluation. The course will be a mix of lectures, group projects, guest speakers, and individual written projects.
  • Competencies: 1) Describe the key characteristics of mHealth interventions, the pluses and minuses of various design features, and the populations in which mHealth interventions have and have not shown promise; 2) Be able to design, deploy, and evaluate an mHealth campaign using LifeData software; 3) Be able to describe the development of an mHealth campaign, discussing key issues that drive system design including the reach of mHealth tools in the target population, strengths and weaknesses of various communication channels for the problem of interest, factors determining content development, interconnectivity with other data systems used by health professionals, strategies for financial sustainability and scaling, and indicators of program success.

HBEHED669 Genetics, Health Behavior, and Health Education

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Roberts, Scott
  • Prerequisites: SPH student or permission of instructor
  • Description: This course addresses the following topics: genetics and risk communication; ethical issues in genetics research; the psychological and behavioral impact of genetic testing; public and professional knowledge and attitudes about genetics; health education needs in genetics; and emerging issues in the field (e.g., computerized delivery of genetic counseling services).
  • Syllabus for HBEHED669

HBEHED671 Motivational Interviewing in Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Resnicow, Ken
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: HBEHED600, Perm Instr.
  • Description: In the past few years, there has been increased interest in using motivational interviewing (MI) in public health and medical settings. Originally developed for the treatment of addictive behaviors, MI has recently been used to address chronic disease and other public health conditions, such as smoking, diet, physical activity, diabetes management, and medical adherence. At its core, MI is a method for assisting individuals to work through their ambivalence about behavior change. Deeply rooted in the person-centered philosophy of Carl Rogers, MI counselors are trained to rely heavily on reflective listening, more so than direct questioning, persuasion, or provision of advice. This course will provide participants with an in-depth overview of MI and provide opportunities to practice the core techniques.
  • Syllabus for HBEHED671

HBEHED684 Designing Consumer-Health Technologies

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Klasnja, Predrag
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: SI 582 or by permission of instructor
  • Description: The course focuses on the process of designing consumer-health technologies that are based on constructs from theories about human behavior and behavior change. Using commonly-used theories (e.g., self-monitoring, goal-setting) as examples, students will learn how to generate ideas for possible feature designs, delineate their tradeoffs, and make principled implementation decisions.
  • Course Goals: Consumer-health technologies, such as activity trackers and applications for chronic disease management, frequently incorporate features based behavioral-science theory, such as goal-setting or self-monitoring, intended to help individuals adopt and maintain health-protective behaviors. How exactly such theoretical constructs should be translated into specific designs is rarely obvious, however. In this class, students will learn the key aspects of the process of translating theory into concretely designed technology features: generation of alternative design ideas, delineation of tradeoffs of these ideas based on considerations of user experience and the options' ability to effect desired behavioral outcomes, and choice of which idea(s) to further refine.
  • Competencies: The learning objectives for the course are to: • Understand the overall design process for consumer-health technologies • Understand the tradeoffs of different implementations of commonly used theoretical constructs, such as self-monitoring and goal-setting. • Learn to generate design ideas that embody theoretical constructs from behavioral science • Understand ways that alternative designs can be evaluated during the design process • Learn to articulate and formalize tradeoffs of alternative designs for a feature
  • This course is cross-listed with SI609.

HBEHED693 Seminar on Health and Poverty

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Geronimus, Arline T
  • Offered every other year
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Description: Explores dimensions of poverty in terms of the interrelationships of socioeconomic status, racism, minority status and health. The focus is on the United States and topics discussed include different conceptualizations of and perspectives on the relationship of poverty to health, issues in child and family health, in urban and rural poverty and health, and issues relevant to improving health services and health policy targeted at socioeconomically disvantanged populations.

HBEHED699 Career Development and Capstone in Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Zikmund-Fisher, Brian
  • Description: HBHE 699 is required by students enrolled in the Master's program in HBHE. Students engage in a synthesis of knowledge formation in health behavior and health education. This course supports competency assessment and professional development with a special focus on career development and job placement.

HBEHED700 Advanced Quantitative Methods in Health Behavior

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Heinze, Justin
  • Prerequisites: HBEHED 620 or 621; BIOSTAT 503 and 523 or equivalent
  • Description: This course is an advanced research methods course focused on the quantitative conceptualization and analysis of health behavior research. The course emphasizes the application of multivariate regression to practical questions in public health, and includes an overview of three regression-related techniques: Structural Equation Modeling (SEM), hierarchical linear modeling (HLM), and growth curve modeling (GCM).

HBEHED710 Special MPH Topics in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Master’s level seminar designed to provide an extensive review of a number of substantive and methods and skill areas in health behavior and health education. Readings, discussion and assignments are organized around issues of mutual interest to faculty and students. Reviews and reports on topics required in the areas selected. May be elected more than once.

HBEHED733 COMMUNITY-BASED PARTICIPATORY RESEARCH (CBPR)

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Israel, Barbara
  • Offered every other year
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: Doctoral Student or Advanced Masters Students with permission
  • Description: The involvement of community members in research and scholarship has emerged as a critical component for public health research. This doctoral student seminar focuses on the ways in which researchers and community members collaborate to conduct research that leads to community change, and improvement in health and quality of life. Such efforts often call for clarifications and/or redefinitions of: scientists' roles and methods, the knowledge development roles of participating community members, and the varying meanings of "community." Attention will be paid to scholarly debates, practical, and methodological issues in the conduct of community-based participatory research. This seminar will address the major issues and methods involved in conducting community-based participatory research across different disciplines. It provides the opportunity for graduate students from different schools and departments to come together to share perspectives, develop new skills and explore how they can apply this learning to community-based participatory research projects.

HBEHED885 Health Education Models of Practice and Interventions at the Community Level

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Schulz, Amy
  • Prerequisites: HBHE doctoral students
  • Description: The course is designed as a doctoral seminar for HBHE doctoral students. The course will examine and critique current models of health education and behavior change which intervene at the community level to bring about behavior change which intervene at the community level to bring about behavior change. The focus will be on recognized health education interventions/strategies. Major topics will include: 1) methods for behavior change (i.e., community organizing; mass media, etc.); 2) policy activities; 3) organizational change activities; 4) advocacy activities; 5) community planning models. This course will also be available to second year HBHE masters students on a permission of instructor basis.
  • Course Goals: The goal of this course is to prepare doctoral level students in HBHE to design, implement and assess health promotion interventions at the organizational, community, and policy level.
  • Competencies: See Objectives
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of this course students will be able to: 1. Identify and discuss various strategies and models of health education/health promotion interventions at other than the individual level. 2. Discuss and critique the theory, conceptual frameworks and constructs that serve as the basis of these models. 3. Articulate and critique assumptions underlying these models. 4. Apply these models and constructs to current public health problems. 5. Identify and discuss current evaluation strategies and challenges pertinent to these models. me as 685.

HBEHED886 Theory-Driven Interventions Targeting Individual Behavior Change

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Janz, Nancy K
  • Prerequisites: HBHE doctoral students or Perm Instr
  • Description: The course will involve in-depth discussions of issues and problems in using conceptual models, theories of health behavior, and data to inform interventions targeting individual behavior change. Presentations will focus on the rationale for selection of a particular theory or theories, conceptual framework, how the theory or model was used to develop the intervention, measurement of theoretical constructs, and the barriers encountered in the implementation and evaluation phase of the research. Intervention research will include those that target clients, providers and families.
  • Course Goals: Current faculty intervention studies will form the basis of discussion for several sessions. Some sessions will focus on critique of intervention research in the literature. Some sessions will be lead by a class participant. Since each session relies heavily on class discussion, attendance is required.
  • Competencies: NEED
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Describe the role of conceptual models and theories for informing interventions that promote individual behavior change. 2. Discuss the relative utility of various models and theories dependent on the research question and target audience. 3. Articulate the difficulties and limitations of health decision-making models in providing direction in intervention research. 4. Develop and defend a conceptual model using behavioral, social science, and health education theories/constructs to inform an intervention relevant to a current health problem. 5. Discuss current directions in research involving theory and practice.

HBEHED900 Research in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 2-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Research work undertaken by doctoral students in collaboration with faculty advisers, including participation in on-going departmental research activities. Open only to doctoral students in Health Behavior and Health Education. May be elected more than once.

HBEHED990 Dissertation/Pre-Candidate

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Half Term (IIIA or IIIB, 1-4 credits) Election for dissertation work by doctoral students in Health Behavior and Health Education who are not yet admitted to status as a candidate.

HBEHED995 Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Half Term (IIIA or IIIB, 1-4 credits) Election for dissertation work by doctoral students admitted to status as candidate.

HMP553 DATA MANAGEMENT IN HEALTH CARE

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mendez, David
  • Description: This course introduces the students to the use of spreadsheets and relational databases for decision-making. It covers data manipulation and analysis, formatting and charting using Microsoft Excel; as well as design and implementation of, and data retrieval from, small-to-medium relational database systems using Microsoft Access.
  • Course Goals: The students are expected to develop a working knowledge of design and implementation of small to medium relational database systems, data retrieval and complex spreadsheet modeling and manipulation.
  • Competencies: Measurement and Decision Making

HMP601 Healthcare Quality, Performance Measurement and Improvement

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Ryan, Andrew
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: HMP 600
  • Description: HMP 601, building on the material in HMP 600, focuses on: the definition and assessment of quality of care; control of quality and costs of care through market-oriented strategies, professional self-regulation, intra-organizational process improvement approaches, third-party strategies, and government regulation; and system reform.

HMP602 Survey of the U.S. Health Care System

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: Analysis of current organizational arrangements and patterns for provision and financing of medical care services in the United States. Topics include the medical care process and factors which affect need, access and use of services; factors affecting supply and distribution of health professionals and health facilities, and current issues pertinent to these health care services; factors related to health care costs; quality assessment and assurance; and financing of care through health insurance and governmental programs.
  • Syllabus for HMP602

HMP603 Organization and Management of Healthcare Systems

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s):
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: HMP Masters Standing or Perm Instr
  • Description: This course is one of two HMP courses that fulfills the organization theory/management degree requirement. These courses provide knowledge of the theories of organizations, the use of leadership, management processes, and organizational structures and outcomes. Specific topics include governance, strategic management and marketing, human resources management, and process improvement. This course is designed for future managers and leaders of health care organizations and those who expect to have extensive involvement with them from the perspective of buyers, insurers, or policy makers. The course provides students with knowledge about how the best health care provider organizations deliver high quality, cost effective health care, how they respond to their environment, and how they reach and implement decisions about future activities.

HMP606 Managerial Accounting for Health Care Administrators

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Singh, Simone
  • Prerequisites: Intermediate microeconomics theory
  • Description: Concepts and techniques of managerial accounting for generalist health care administrators. Topics covered include full cost measurement, differential cost measurement and analysis, sources of revenue, price setting, budgeting and control, costs and decision-making fund accounting

HMP607 Corporate Finance for Health Care Administrators

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): McCullough, Jeffrey
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: HMP606
  • Description: Corporate finance theory and applications to health care organizations. Topics include the capital expenditure decision, the capital financing decision, financial feasibility, financial planning, cash management, and financial aspects of prepayment programs. The course makes extensive use of case studies.
  • Syllabus for HMP607

HMP609 Advanced Corporate Finance - Special Topics

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Grazier, Kyle
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: Financial accounting
  • Description: Embrace in-depth financial management concepts and tools; immerse yourself in the beauty of the numbers and what they represent, and what they tell you about activities and decisions.Celebrate your mastery of this language of finance and how, as an interpreter, you can help lead your organization to purpose and success.
  • Course Goals: The objectives of the course in the curriculum are to: -Participate in independent and collaborative learning and leadership advancement. -Integrate and apply the analytic perspectives explored in earlier courses and experiences, and test new approaches to creating value and addressing challenges. -Apply evidence-based standards and mixed-methods analysis to diverse management challenges. -Evaluate the complex environmental, social, and economic implications of financial decisions on organizations and their communities.
  • Competencies: -Recognize and access sources of information that contribute to the robust analysis of current and future managerial and policy- related issues; (A.1., A.2, A.3., A.4., A.5., A.6., A.7., C.5.C.7.C.8.) -Consider and utilize multiple frameworks for decision making; (A.6., A.7., and A.8. A.9) -Recognize the value and demonstrate proficiency in financial, statistical, and operational analysis used in decision making; (A.4., A.5., A.6., A.7., B.1, B.2., and B.3. D.1.) -Pose clear, logical, and grammatically correct questions critical to analysis and decision making; (B.1., A.10. E.1., E.2.) -Identify strategic and tactical issues and solutions, and communicate these with peers; (A.7., A.8., and A.9. A.10. D.1.) -Recognize in oneself and others effective leadership thinking and behavior; facilitate and evaluate collaborative group processes for value and effectiveness; (C.1., C.2.) -Create, organize and teach material, and through evaluation processes, improve effectiveness and value to oneself and other audiences; (B.1., B. 2. B.3.,C.1, C.2.,C.3.,C.5., C.7.C.8. D.2., E.1., E.2., E.3., E.4.) -Recognize gaps in knowledge and skills, and use the course as an opportunity to extend learning and apply novel approaches to analysis within and beyond course assignments;(C.3.E.3., E.4.,E.5) -Evaluate the consequences of managerial actions to stakeholders and decision makers. (E.1., E.2. E.3., C.5., C.6.)

HMP611 Population Health Informatics

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Dombkowski, Kevin
  • Prerequisites: HMP 668 / SI 542 / BIOINF 668 Introduction to Health Informatics or permission of instructor.
  • Description: This course explores the foundations of population health informatics, including information architecture; data standards and confidentiality as they pertain to population health management. This course examines key concepts related to registries, electronic health records, epidemiological databases, biosurveillance, health promotion, and quality reporting in population health management.
  • Course Goals: At the end of this course, students will be able to: -Demonstrate and apply a working knowledge of population health terminology; -Understand and apply health informatics concepts that are salient to population health; -Apply data concepts, standards and architectures for sharing information to meet population health objectives; -Demonstrate how various information technology tools and strategies are applied in the practice of population health; and -Understand current challenges in population health and evaluate potential informatics solutions.
  • Competencies: This course provides training toward the following HMP major competencies: A.3 - Develop, understand and use data from performance, surveillance or monitoring systems. A.8 - Operational analysis: Analyze, design, or improve an organizational process, including the use of quality management, process improvement, marketing and information technology principles and tools. A.9 - Population health assessment: Understand and apply basic epidemiologic principles, measures, and methods to assess the health status of a population; identify risk factors in individuals and communities; evaluate the impact of population-based interventions and initiatives. In addition, the following minor competencies will be also addressed: B.1 - Convey: Speak and write in a clear, logical, and grammatical manner in formal and informal situations; prepare cogent business presentations; facilitate an effective group process. E.1 - Actively seek feedback from others, reflecting and learning from successes and failures. E.2 - Develop an accurate view of own strengths and developmental needs, including the impact one has on others.
  • This course is cross-listed with SI611.

HMP617 US Food Policy and Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Wolfson, Julia
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course uses the social ecological framework as a vehicle to explore the different factors that influence the way we eat. We will examine different policy and public health approaches to address problems stemming from the modern US food system within the context of the social/cultural factors that surround food.
  • Course Goals: The goal of this course is to provide students with a nuanced understanding of the social and policy determinants of eating behavior, the complex relationship between food and health, and the policy levers available to influence that relationship. The specific objectives of this course are to help students: 1. Understand and assess the complex and interrelated factors (individual, structural and policy) that influence eating behavior and food related public health problems. 2. Appraise the political landscape and stakeholders that are important for making policy change in the area of food systems and eating behavior. 3. Apply principles of policy-making, policy change theory, and social determinants of health to food related problems in the US. 4. Critically evaluate academic literature, reports, and policy documents related to food and food systems. 5. Develop strong written and verbal communication skills. 6. Define and frame public health problems in such a way that inspires policy change.
  • Competencies: Primary course competencies: A.6: Policy analysis: Understand the policy-making process and the role of politics; assess a problem and identify and compare potential policy solutions; and understand and critically assess methods to evaluate policy impact. B.1: Convey: Speak and write in a clear, logical and grammatical manner in formal and informal situations; prepare presentations; facilitate and participate in group discussions. C.5: Collaboration: Work collaboratively with others as part of a team or group, demonstrating commitment to the team's goal and encouraging individuals to put forth their best effort. Secondary course competencies B.2: Listen: receive, process, and respond appropriately to information conveyed by others. B.3: Interact: Perceive and respond appropriately to the spoken, unspoken or partly expressed thoughts, feelings and concerns of others.
  • Syllabus for HMP617

HMP619 Health and the Public Policy Process

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Jarman, Holly
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course analyzes the US policy process in relation to US healthcare and public health systems. We explore how conditions within society are framed as problems, how problems are placed on political agendas, how problems get matched with potential solutions, and pay attention to the challenges of implementation and evaluation.
  • Course Goals: Upon completing the class, students will be able to understand the public policy process as it relates to US healthcare and public health systems, and apply that understanding to: • Identify a range of policy alternatives in response to a perceived problem in the healthcare or public health system; • Evaluate policy alternatives using evidence; • Recommend actions based on the evaluation of policy alternatives, and; • Create strategies to communicate and promote a given policy alternative.
  • Competencies: A6 Understand the policy-making process and the role of politics; assess a problem and identify and compare potential policy solutions; and understand and critically assess methods to evaluate policy impact. • Written assessments • Participation in class discussions • Policy analysis in-class exercises C6 Persuade and convince others, both individuals and groups, to support a point of view, position, or recommendation. • Written assessments • Participation in class discussions • Team-based presentations C7 Understand and learn from governance structures, formal and informal decision-making structures, and power relationships in an organization, industry, or community. • Reading assignments • Written assessments • Participation in class discussions • Team-based presentations Additional competencies A1 Identify appropriate sources and gather information, effectively and efficiently. • Written assessments • Participation in class discussions • Policy analysis in-class exercises • Team-based presentations A2 Appraise literature and data critically. • Reading assignments • Written assessments B1 Speak and write in a clear, logical, and grammatical manner in formal and informal situations; prepare cogent business presentations; facilitate an effective group process. • Written assessments • Participation in class discussions • Team-based presentations C2 Analyze the business, demographic, ethno-cultural, political, and regulatory implications of decisions and develop strategies that continually improve the long-term success and viability of the organization. (with a focus on political and regulatory decisions and their implications) • Reading assignments • Participation in class discussions • Written assessments • Team-based presentations

HMP620 Professional Development

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Killaly, Catherine
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course is designed for HMP students to synthesize, integrate learning and to foster professional development and lifelong learning habits.
  • Course Goals: This course will allow HMP students to synthesize, integrate learning and to foster professional development and lifelong learning habits.
  • Competencies: Domain: Leadership C.3 Accountability: Hold self and others accountable to standards of performance; encourage commitment to the long-term good of the organization. C.6 Impact and Influence: Persuade and convince others, both individuals and groups, to support a point of view, position, or recommendation. Domain: Professional Development E.1 Actively seek feedback from others, reflecting and learning from successes and failures. E.2 Develop an accurate view of own strengths and developmental needs, including the impact one has on others. E.3 Continuously push self to raise personal standards of performance and exceed expectations. E.4 Address knowledge, skills, and other developmental gaps through reflective, self-directed learning, and by trying new approaches. E.5 Establish, build, and sustain a network for professional development.
  • Syllabus for HMP620

HMP623 Principles and Practice of Preventive Medicine

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Power, Laura
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course is intended to introduce preventive medicine residents and graduate students to the principles of preventive medicine and public health via a seminar approach.
  • Course Goals: Goal: To introduce preventive medicine residents and public health graduate students to the principles of preventive medicine and public health via a seminar approach. Course Objectives (course competencies): 1.Individual seminars are facilitated by residency physician faculty and other invited physician faculty who provide guidance and oversight to the presenting resident for a given session. 2. Students will develop presentations that are based on peer review papers selected by the residents who also facilitate the participation of non-physicians enrolled in the course. 3.Students will present on topics including, but not limited to, emerging infectious diseases, cancer epidemiology, public health policy, preventive health services and management, immunizations, cardiovascular disease, and genomics.
  • Competencies: EPID: 2. Discuss population patterns of vital statistics, outbreaks, and health outcomes in terms of person, place and time. 8.Understand basic aspects of applied epidemiology in population, community, and/or hospital settings...and the relative use of epidemiological, clinical and laboratory information specific to each. 9.Demonstrate written and oral communication skills related to epidemiological sciences within the context of public health. HMP: 6. Understand and apply basic epidemiological principles, measures, and methods to assess the health status of a population; identify risk factors in individuals and communities; evaluate the impact of population-based interventions and initiatives. 8. Speak and write in a clear,logical;, and grammatical manner in formal and informal situations; prepare cogent business presentations; facilitate an effective group process. 10. Analyze the business, demographic, ethnocultural, political and regulatory implications of decisions and develop strategies that continually improve the long-term success and viability of the organization.
  • This course is cross-listed with EPID 650.

HMP624 Health Policy Challenges in Developing Countries

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): McLaren, Zoe
  • Prerequisites: Graduate standing required.
  • Description: HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and diarrheal disease are the four biggest contributors to the burden of disease in sub-Saharan Africa and represent a serious constraint on economic growth. They kill nearly 4 million African adults and children annually. Readings from the public health, economic and medical literature will focus on the main debates surrounding policy interventions to combat these diseases. The class will examine and evaluate the evidence on the nature of these diseases and the effectiveness of current interventions in Africa and other parts of the developing world. Through class discussion, small group exercises and writing assignments, students will hone their skills in policy and economic analysis. For the final project, students will develop policy recommendations for governments of developing countries on a global health issue of their choice.
  • Course Goals: The goal of this course is to introduce students to some major challenges in health policy to address infectious disease in developing countries and provide them with analytical and economic tools to gather evidence, interpret evidence, devise policy recommendations and communicate clearly.
  • Competencies: Domain A: Measurement and Analysis Measurement: A.1 Identify appropriate sources and gather information, effectively and efficiently. A.2 Appraise literature and data critically. Analysis: A.5 Statistical analysis: Understand and apply basic statistical methods relevant to public health practice. A.6 Policy analysis: Understand the policy-making process and the role of politics; assess a problem and identify and compare potential policy solutions; and understand and critically assess methods to evaluate policy impact. A.7 Economic analysis: Use basic microeconomic theory to understand how the incentives of consumers, providers, and payers affect behaviors, costs, and other outcomes; understand and apply basic econometric tools for the empirical study of issues in health economics. Domain B: Communication B.1 Convey: Speak and write in a clear, logical, and grammatical manner in formal and informal situations; prepare cogent business presentations; facilitate an effective group process.* B.2 Listen: Receive, process, and respond appropriately to information conveyed by others. B.3 Interact: Perceive and respond appropriately to the spoken, unspoken or partly expressed thoughts, feelings, and concerns of others.* Domain C: Leadership C.6 Impact and Influence: Persuade and convince others, both individuals and groups, to support a point of view, position, or recommendation.*
  • Learning Objectives: At the completion of this course, students will be expected to: 1. Become familiar with sources of evidence on the effectiveness and appropriateness of policy interventions. 2. Be able to discern reliable sources of evidence and identify limitations of the evidence. 3. Develop skills in using economic concepts to support specific policy interventions. 4. Develop skills in determining appropriate health policy interventions. 5. Develop skills in articulating and advocating policy positions through written submissions and in-class discussion.

HMP625 COMPARATIVE HEALTH POLICY AND MANAGEMENT IN HIGH INCOME COUNTRIES

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Greer, Scott
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course is about the health policies and debates of the rich democracies. It should (1) furnish students with the basic language and toolkit of comparative health policy analysis and (2) introduce students to the comparative analysis of issues in health policy and management.
  • Course Goals: It should (1) furnish students with the basic language and toolkit of comparative health policy analysis and (2) introduce students to the comparative analysis and different global experience of issues in health policy and management. See also competencies, below.
  • Competencies: The competencies from the class are reflected in this assessment system. Students should improve your measurement and analysis skills, as seen in the presentations' requirements that students (1) Identify appropriate sources and gather information, using efficient technology where possible and (2) Appraise literature and data critically as well as the requirements that for presentations, writing, and class participation students will have to show your ability to analyse (1) policy and (2) strategy. Communications skills are at the heart of this class. Presentations, writing, and class participation measure students' ability to (1) speak and write in a clear, logical, and grammatical manner in formal and informal situations, to prepare cogent business presentations, and to facilitate a group. (2) receive, process, and respond appropriately to information conveyed by others and (3) accurately hear and understand the unspoken or partly expressed thoughts, feelings, and concerns of others. Students' leadership skills should develop and manifest themselves in your need to collaborate in group projects as well as to show your ability to develop strategic analyses and analyse accountability in any of the assignments, where you are identifying what people are doing and why. Finally, the discussion of law and political institutions should illuminate the role of law in strategy and planning.
  • Syllabus for HMP625

HMP626 Race, Ethnicity, Culture and Policy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Creary, Melissa
  • Prerequisites: Graduate Standing
  • Description: This course is writing intensive and will critically examine aspects of health and policy reform from state and federal perspective. Taught primarily from a US perspective, topics with an international lens will be covered to explore domestic policy and international implications of policies and structures.

HMP627 Population Dynamics and Policy

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mehta, Neil
  • Description: Examine the interrelationship between core population issues, public policy and health policy. A rigorous treatment of core population topics useful to designing effective policies. A broad array of population topics including population health and life expectancy, population aging, immigration, population and climate change, low fertility, and health disparities are covered.
  • Course Goals: Identify and understand core population issues and their importance to public health Evaluate academic and popular claims concerning population issues Know how to access population data and be able to evaluate their strengths and limitations Integrate knowledge of core population issues within professional undertakings in health policy Build skills in designing evidence-based policies
  • Competencies: A.1 Identify appropriate sources and gather information, effectively and efficiently. A.2 Appraise literature and data critically. A.9 Population health assessment: Understand and apply basic epidemiologic principles, measures, and methods to assess the health status of a population; identify risk factors in individuals and communities; evaluate the impact of population-based interventions and initiatives.

HMP628 Data Analytics in Healthcare

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): McCullough, Jeffrey
  • Description: This course will introduce students to machine learning and other big data analytic techniques. We will illustrate the strengths and limitations of these tools and their applications for policy and industry. Topics will include risk prediction, precision medicine, and population health. We will also discuss the legal and ethical issues.
  • Course Goals: Introduce machine learning techniques. Understand their strengths and limitations. Understand relationship between these tools and concepts such as population health and precision medicine. Ability to apply tools to health institutions and policies. Awareness of potential unintended consequences of these tools.
  • Competencies: a. A.1 Identify appropriate sources and gather information, effectively and efficiently b. A.2 Appraise literature and data critically c. A.3 Develop, understand and use data from performance, surveillance or monitoring systems d. A.5 Statistical analysis e. A.7 Economic analysis: Use basic microeconomic theory to understand how the incentives of consumers, providers, and payers affect behaviors, costs, and other outcomes; understand and apply basic econometric tools for the empirical study of issues in health economics. f. A.8 Operational analysis: Analyze, design, or improve an organizational process, including the use of quality management, process improvement, marketing and information technology principles and tools. g. A.9 Population health assessment: Understand and apply basic epidemiologic principles, measures, and methods to assess the health status of a population; identify risk factors in individuals and communities; evaluate the impact of population-based interventions and initiatives. h. A.10 Decision Making: Implement a decision-making process that incorporates evidence from a broad analysis that includes uncertainty, risk, stakeholders, and organizational values. i. B.1 Convey: Speak and write in a clear, logical, and grammatical manner in formal and informal situations; prepare cogent business presentations; facilitate an effective group process. j. C.1 Organizational Vision: Through effective governance, establish an organization's values, vision, and mission; systematically enhance performance and human, material and knowledge resources. k. C.2 Strategic Orientation: Analyze the business, demographic, ethno-cultural, political, and regulatory implications of decisions and develop strategies that continually improve the long-term success and viability of the organization. l. C.5 Collaboration: Work collaboratively with others as part of a team or group, demonstrating commitment to the team's goal and encouraging individuals to put forth their best effort. m. C.7 Organizational Awareness: Understand and learn from governance structures, formal and informal decision-making structures, and power relationships in an organization, industry, or community. n. D.2 Behave ethically and promote standards of ethical behavior throughout organizations and professional communities. o. E.3 Continuously push self to raise personal standards of performance and exceed expectations. 3. Analyze quantitative and qualitative data using biostatistics, informatics, computer-based programming and software, as appropriate 4. Interpret results of data analysis for public health research, policy or practice 7. Assess population needs, assets and capacities that affect communities' health 15. Evaluate policies for their impact on public health and health equity 19. Communicate audience-appropriate public health content, both in writing and through oral presentation 21. Perform effectively on interprofessional teams
  • Learning Objectives: 3. Explain the role of quantitative and qualitative methods and sciences in describing and assessing a population's health. 10. Explain the social, political and economic determinants of health and how they contribute to population health and health inequities.

HMP629 Employer-Provided Health Benefits

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Bechel-Marriott, Diane
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: HMP 600 and 601 or 602
  • Description: This survey and applied policy analysis class will provide students with an understanding of dynamics and key trends in employer-provided health care benefits. In addition to an overview of the topic, three areas merit special focus. First, pharmaceutical design will be explored. Though increasing technological innovation has brought a continuous cycle of new products to market, the lack of comprehensive effectiveness studies makes it difficult to ascertain optimal benefit. Interesting voluntary efforts will be highlighted that may lay a cornerstone for greater value. A second issue covered will be retiree benefit design. An aging population, stricter financial reporting requirements, and increased costs have prompted new ways to manage post-retirement health obligations. Several models, including Health Reimbursement Arrangements, Voluntary Employee Benefit Associations, and access-only platforms will be discussed. Finally, the important role of employer and community coalitions in better aligning incentives among patients, providers and employers will be explored. The focus of this seminar style course is on developing the knowledge, skills and methods necessary to better interact with employer groups. In-class work will involve class lectures, discussions, readings, speakers, activities, and assignments.

HMP631 Health Insurance and Payment Systems

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Bechel-Marriott, Diane
  • Prerequisites: HMP 600, HMP 602, HMP 606, HMP 661 or Perm Instr
  • Description: This course examines the conceptual and management frameworks for financing health care services through insurance, contracting and managed care. It analyzes past and current research on the formulation of payment techniques and the impact of reimbursement methods on consumers, providers, payers and society.

HMP633 Health Insurance in America. How Did We Get Into This Mess? How Do We Get Out?

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Udow-Phillips, Marianne
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: HMP 600
  • Description: This course explores the history, structure and likely future trends of health insurance in the U.S. The course includes policy analyses of health insurance related issues focusing on potential solution alternatives to political and practical problems. It provides in depth overview of basic features of private and public health insurance.
  • Course Goals: The major objective of the course is to provide the student with a comprehensive understanding of how the United States public/private health insurance system functions. It will provide future health services leaders with a working knowledge of the interrelationships between public programs and private insurance and approaches to cost control using risk management, provider reimbursement, benefit design and other approaches.
  • Competencies: 1. Improvement in writing, presentation and analytic skills, focused on framing issues and developing logical approaches to the resolution of issues. 2. Practical understanding of how the private insurance market functions, including how the market is segmented and the competencies required for each segment. 3. Understanding of the impact of risk on private insurance and techniques that are utilized to manage and mitigate the influence of risk selection. 4. Identification of the different international models for health care financing and coverage and the unique aspects of the American system. 5. Appreciation of the distinction between lowering costs to improve competitive advantage and lowering overall health care costs and the tactics and strategies that could be developed for each approach. 6. Understanding of the challenges that confront the future viability of public health insurance programs, including assessment of the options that will be considered, and the strengths and weaknesses of centralized versus decentralized administrative models. 7. Improved skills in working with groups to evaluate and craft potential solutions to policy issues. 8. Recognize the challenges inherent in balancing affordability, access and quality in public and private health insurance programs and the tradeoffs that are required to achieve a mix that meets purchaser and political requirements.
  • Syllabus for HMP633

HMP635 Case Analysis & Competition Presentation

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s):
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: HMP 600, HMP 615
  • Description: This class is designed for students willing to represent the department at the next NAHSE intercollegiate team competition. The course will develop skills at analyzing strategically oriented cases in healthcare management. In addition, students learn presentation skills in a supportive environment with feedback from peers, faculty and alumni. Students selected to compete at NAHSE and other students selected based on performance in the initial term will be invited to be facilitators in the following winter term.

HMP637 PHARMACOECONOMICS AND OUTCOMES RESEARCH IN DRUG DEVELOPMENT, APPROVAL, AND REIMBURSEMENT

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Shah, Manasee
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: HMP students who have taken the two course economic sequence (HMP 600 & 663)
  • Description: The purpose of this class is for public health students to understand the role pharmaceutical products play in the US healthcare system by gaining a deeper comprehension of the drug research, development, approval, and reimbursement processes with an emphasis on the role of pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research data.
  • Course Goals: • Obtain a thorough knowledge of the basic principles of pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research and their role in drug development, approval, and reimbursement • Gain a broad understanding of the drug development and approval process, including the roles of regulators and payers • Understand what drives patient access and payer reimbursement • Apply this knowledge to create a strategy for the development, approval, and reimbursement of a hypothetical drug
  • Competencies: A (Measurement & Analysis) 1. Identify sources; 2. Appraise sources; 7. Economic analysis; 10. Decision making; C (Leadership) 7. Organizational awareness.

HMP638 MEASURING AND MONITORING POPULATION HEALTH

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mehta, Neil
  • Prerequisites: .
  • Description: This course is an introduction to the measurement and monitoring of population health. Fundamentals of measuring population health including the measurement of life expectancy, healthy life expectancy, infant and maternal mortality, fertility, reproductive, and contraceptive measures, and the population attributable risk fraction will be covered.
  • Course Goals: Upon successful completion of the course, it is my objective that students will at minimum: ? Be able to critically interpret published population health data in policy relevant publications ? Possess a practical working knowledge of the main sources of population health data, where to access them, and their strengths and limitations ? Be able to compute from raw data the major indices of population health (e.g., life expectancy) ? Have improved their data analysis skills using Excel ? Have the ability to apply the core concepts of demography and population dynamics in applied data work and in interpreting published findings
  • Competencies: The following Department of Health Management and Policy competencies (see: https://sph.umich.edu/hmp/pdf/HMPCompetencyModel2014.pdf) are covered in this course: A.1 Measurement: Identify appropriate sources and gather information, effectively and efficiently. A.2 Measurement: Appraise literature and data critically. A.3 Measurement: Develop, understand and use data from performance, surveillance or monitoring systems. A.5 Statistical analysis: Understand and apply basic statistical methods relevant to public health practice. A.9 Population health assessment: Understand and apply basic epidemiologic principles, measures, and methods to assess the health status of a population; identify risk factors in individuals and communities; evaluate the impact of population-based interventions and initiatives. B.1 Convey: Speak and write in a clear, logical, and grammatical manner in formal and informal situations; prepare cogent business presentations; facilitate an effective group process. B.2 Listen: Receive, process, and respond appropriately to information conveyed by others. B.3 Interact: Perceive and respond appropriately to the spoken, unspoken or partly expressed thoughts, feelings, and concerns of others.

HMP640 Program Evaluation in Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: grad status
  • Description: The Purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the fundamentals of evaluation and research as applied to public health programs, policies and other types of interventions. The course covers impact, outcomes, process and participatory evaluation, and a number of research designs common in public health evaluation research, Students will gain skills in framing evaluation questions. In addition, students will gain skills needed to understand and critique published evaluation literature, and skills in measurement/data collection strategies. Class format includes lecture, discussion articles, and small group exercises. For final project, students will design and write and evaluation plan in the format of a proposal for funding.

HMP648 Empirical Methods for Health informatics

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course examines health informatics as an empirical science. The course will focus on formal studies of applications of information technology applied to health care, population health, and personal health. These studies can be conducted while an information resource is under development and after a resource is in routine service.
  • Course Goals: After completing this course students will be able to: i. Select and utilize the appropriate research / evaluation method for their health informatics questions ii. Evaluate the empirical literature of the field; iii. Design and conduct studies appropriate to problems in the field.
  • Competencies: A.1 Identify appropriate sources and gather information, effectively and efficiently. A.2 Appraise literature and data critically. A.3 Develop, understand and use data from performance, surveillance or monitoring systems. A.5 Statistical Analysis: Understand and apply basic statistical methods relevant to public health practice. A.8 Operational Analysis: Analyze, design, or improve an organizational process, including the use of quality management, process improvement, marketing and information technology principles and tools. B.2 Listen: Receive, process, and respond appropriately to information conveyed by others. B.3 Interact: Perceive and respond appropriately to the spoken, unspoken or partly expressed thoughts, feelings, and concerns of others. C.7 Organizational Awareness: Understand and learn from governance structures, formal and informal decision-making structures, and power relationships in an organization, industry, or community.
  • This course is cross-listed with Cross-listed in SI; no SI number yet assigned..

HMP649 Critical Policy Issues in Health IT

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Friedman, Charles
  • Description: This course uses a policy analysis lens to critically examine issues related to the use of IT in healthcare. It will examine key policies in three areas: clinical informatics, consumer informatics, and population health informatics. The primary focus will be on the U.S. but international approaches will also be discussed.
  • Course Goals: Students completing the course will (1) understand the policies and government-led efforts that impact (both directly and indirectly) health informatics; and (2) be able to critically analyze these policies in order to understand how they will shape the health informatics landscape as well as to make suggested improvements that are practically and politically feasible. There are specific learning objectives for each session in the syllabus.
  • Competencies: (1) To understand key regulations and policies that relate to health IT (e.g., the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act, HIPAA, Stark). (2) To understand the key stakeholders involved in and impacted by the key regulations and policies. (3) To understand and be able to apply a policy analysis framework (4) To develop policy-relevant writing skills
  • This course is cross-listed with SI654.

HMP653 Law and Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Haffajee, Rebecca
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: The purposes of this course are to examine the legal context of the relationship between the individual and the community, and to understand public health regulation in the context of a market-driven system. The goals of the course are for students to understand generally: constitutional authority and limits on governmental intervention in public health (i.e., individual rights vs. society's rights); the functions of and interactions between courts, legislatures, and regulators; how law will affect students as strategic thinkers in public health positions; how to recognize legal issues and communicate with attorneys; and the process of public health regulation and potential legal barriers to public health intervention strategies. Specific topics will vary, but will usually include: the nature and scope of public health authority; constitutional constraints on public health initiatives; tobacco control; youth violence; injury prevention; the spread of communicable disease; and regulating environmental risk. This class can be taken as an elective, in fulfillment of the law/politics requirement, or as a BIC requirement.
  • Syllabus for HMP653

HMP655 Decision Making Models in Health Care

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mendez, David
  • Prerequisites: HMP654
  • Description: Application of computer models for decision making in the health care sector. The students will be exposed to Monte Carlo Simulation, Process Simulation, Multiple Regression analysis, Discriminant Analysis, Project Management, Inventory Control, Integer Linear Programming, and Multi-Criteria Optimization. Use of computers and spreadsheet modeling will be emphasized throughout the class.
  • Syllabus for HMP655

HMP662 The Economics of Health Management and Policy

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Hirth, Richard McLaren, Zoe
  • Prerequisites: Enrollment in the HMP Executive Masters program
  • Description: HMP 662 will introduce students to economic analysis through general microeconomic theory of consumer and producer behavior. This general theory will then be applied to a variety of health and health care topics, including health insurance, health behaviors, and markets for healthcare services.
  • Course Goals: To introduce students to economic analysis and economic reasoning through microeconomic theory and its application to health and health care.
  • Competencies: The primary learning objectives of the course are to familiarize students with the approach and terminology of microeconomic analysis and its application to health and health care. The major exit competency is in economic analysis, with minor competencies in the use of data, statistical analysis, policy analysis, decision-making, and collaborate/teams.

HMP667 Advanced Seminar in Health Care Financial Management

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Grazier, Kyle
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: HMP Student or Perm of Instr. and HMP 607
  • Description: This course builds on the language, theories and methods of finance and accounting through the study of financial transactions involving health care and other industries. Topics include financing alternatives, valuations, financial forecasting, risk management, entreprenuership and sustainable growth. Among the transactions studied are corporate lending, venture capital acquisition, and public offerings. Cases, readings, lectures.

HMP671 Cross-national Comparisons of Aging and Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Liang, Jersey
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course examines aging and health within a global context. The focus will be placed primarily on old age support systems in the United States and several other developed nations (e.g., Canada, Germany, Japan, and United Kingdom). Specifically, comparisons across these nations will be made in: (a) population aging and health, (b) acute care, (c) long-term care, and (d) family-based support, and (e) financial security in old age. Population aging and health in developing nations (e.g., China, India) will be reviewed in light of the lessons learned in the developed countries.

HMP672 Population health in China

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s):
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Description: This course aims to provide an overview of population health and related policy issues in China. It consists of three main sections: (a) population and development, (b) burden of disease, and (c) health care financing and delivery.
  • Course Goals: At the completion of this course, students will be expected to learn about the following: 1. Population health in China in the context of demographic transition, economic development, and urbanization, 2. Health care financing, workforce, organization, and reforms in China, 3. Major public health challenges in China and their policy implications, and 4. Apply the knowledge of population health in China to the analysis of current issues in health policy and management. In addition, to sharpen their management and leadership skills, students are required to: 1. Engage in collaborative learning by participating in a journal club, 2. Learn how to write a policy paper, and 3. Conduct professional presentations and peer reviews.
  • Competencies: A.1 Identify appropriate sources and gather information, effectively and efficiently. A.2 Appraise literature and data critically. A.6 Policy analysis: Understand the policy-making process and the role of politics; assess a problem and identify and compare potential policy solutions; and understand and critically assess methods to evaluate policy impact. A.9 Population health assessment: Understand and apply basic epidemiologic principles, measures, and methods to assess the health status of a population; identify risk factors in individuals and communities; evaluate the impact of population-based interventions and initiatives. B.1 Convey: Speak and write in a clear, logical, and grammatical manner in formal and informal situations; prepare cogent business presentations; facilitate an effective group process.* B.2 Listen: Receive, process, and respond appropriately to information conveyed by others. B.3 Interact: Perceive and respond appropriately to the spoken, unspoken or partly expressed thoughts, feelings, and concerns of others.* E.1 Actively seek feedback from others, reflecting and learning from successes and failures. E.2 Develop an accurate view of own strengths and developmental needs, including the impact one has on others.* E.3 Continuously push self to raise personal standards of performance and exceed expectations. E.4 Address knowledge, skills, and other developmental gaps through reflective, self-directed learning, and by trying new approaches.*

HMP673 Health Program Management and Evaluation in Resource Poor Countries

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s):
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: EPID554
  • Description: This course will introduce future leaders to the skills and techniques required in order to become effective program managers of health projects in resource poor countries. The course covers a diverse set of topics within the context of health programs in resource poor countries that include: project and process management; project sustainability and quality assurance; proposal/grant writing; human resource management; project and process management software and technology; and financial budget development and monitoring. Each session of two hours will consist of a one hour seminar followed by one hour of practical exercises through group discussion and application of skills/techniques to real world scenarios. The course will primarily rely on case study analysis, readings from a variety of management, global health other social science journals and personal experiences of invited SPH faculty/guest speakers.
  • Course Goals: The overall goal of the course is to introduce students to the fundamental skills and techniques required in order to become effective program managers of health projects in resource poor countries. Other course objectives are for students to: 1) develop an understanding of health program management and monitoring in resource poor countries through real world case study analyses; and 2) identify any technical, financial, political and human resource factors required to implement and sustain successful health projects with particular reference to resource-constrained environments.
  • Competencies: Students will gain competencies in 1) applying program management and evaluation tools/techniques to health programs in resource poor countries; 2) applying project and process management software; 3) understanding the fundamental principles of successful proposal preparation/grant writing techniques; and 4) improve knowledge, ability and skills levels in health program management in a resource poor country context.
  • Learning Objectives: Students will have an understanding of the language and application of program management and evaluation tools/techniques to health programs in resource poor countries. Students will also appreciate the challenges of health program management in resource poor countries and how to identify appropriate tools/techniques to mitigate them through interactive exercises and hands-on applications. Other learning objectives are: 1) develop and enhance professional skills in program design, program monitoring and evaluation and resource allocation; 2) acquire the confidence, knowledge and skills needed to become effective program managers in global health practice; 3) equip students with the skills that are necessary to work effectively as a team member or team leader/facilitator; and 4) enable students to design, manage and evaluate health programs in resource poor countries.

HMP674 The Economics of Health Management and Policy II

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): McLaren, Zoe Norton, Edward
  • Prerequisites: HMP 660
  • Description: The focus of the course is on how the demand for and supply of health care services interact to yield market outcomes (prices and quantities) in health and health care. The purpose of the course is to give students experience analyzing health management and health policy issues using economic tools.

HMP680 Special Topics in Health Management and Policy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: Lecture, seminars and readings selected on a current or emerging topic or theme in health, management and policy. The specific material and format will vary by semester and instructor.
  • Course Goals: Will vary by topic and instructor.
  • Competencies: Will vary by topic and instructor.

HMP682 Case Studies in Health Services Administration

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s):
  • Prerequisites: Second year HMP masters candidate or Perm Instr
  • Description: Analysis of cases dealing with administrative and policy issues in health services, offered as one of two integrative capstone course for persons completing the MHSA or MPH in the Department of Health Management and Policy. The course addresses primarily issues of healthcare delivery, from the perspective of corporate strategy. Emphasis is on student solutions to ill-defined, multi-faceted problems taken from actual situations. Specific competencies developed by the course address both process team work and collaboration to analyze complex issues, presentation skills and contents identifying key business success factors and strategic alternatives for provider organizations and health insurers in various settings.

HMP684 The Politics of Health Services Policy

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Greer, Scott
  • Prerequisites: MHSA student or PI
  • Description: Understanding politics is crucial for understanding a health care organization's environment and determining its strategy. Whether through payment structures, coverage plans, safety regulation or simple zoning conflicts, governments shape health care delivery. This course equips students to understand and influence American politics. It presents the basic institutions and political strategies of contemporary health policymaking, focusing on the politics of coverage expansion at the state and federal levels and other current political developments. Major topics will include analyzing the structure and lessons of various federal coverage programs and student-led research into the politics of state health coverage schemes. Students will leave the class with an understanding of the political context in which health care executives operate and the importance of engaging in the political process. Since health care policy is often unpredictably influenced by the broader flow of politics, the course will frame health care delivery in the United States in the context of current American politics. This class can be taken as an elective or in fulfillment of the law/politics requirement.

HMP685 The politics of Public Health Policy

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Greer, Scott
  • Prerequisites: Grad Standing
  • Description: Policy requires politics: behind every positive or negative decision governments make, there are elected politicians, politically skilled officials, journalists, and other stakeholders. Understanding the world of politics is crucial to influencing and implementing policies for public health. Indeed, it is impossible to understand public health policy outside of its political context. This class presents the basic institutions and politics of contemporary public health policymaking through studies of institutions and contemporary policy debates. Through analysis of case studies including obesity, state health plans, smoking and pharmaceutical regulation, students will explore the influence of politics on the definitions and decisions of public health issues. They will leave the class with an understanding of how politics explains current public health policymaking debates and an improved ability to understand the politics of major public health policy issues. This class can be taken as an elective, as a BIC requirement, or in fulfillment of the HMP law/politics requirement.

HMP687 Health Care Negotiation

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s):
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Description: Changes in health care require collaboration between disciplines and professionals. Negotiation, a fundamental of organized behavior, is especially challenging in health care because of the large number of stakeholders and the sensitivity around care itself. Conflict management can be achieved through the use of negotiating techniques, with significant economic savings.

HMP690 Readings in Health Management and Policy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status and Perm Instr
  • Description: Directed readings or research on selected topics and problems relevant to health management and policy. May be elected more than once.

HMP694 MS-HSR Thesis Analysis and Presentation

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: MS-HSR second year degree status
  • Description: The student will produce a thesis, based on independent research (with guidance and mentoring from HMP faculty), to be completed in the second year. The thesis must present original research, as opposed to a literature review or some sort of "thought piece" or opinion statement. The research can involve analysis of primary or secondary data, and the analysis involved can be either qualitative or quantitative. The only requirement is that the thesis involve some sort of data analysis to answer one or more research questions of interest to health services or health policy research.

HMP805 Doctoral Seminar in Health Services and Systems Research III

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Eisenberg, Daniel
  • Description: HMP805 Political Science consists of six 2.5-hour weekly sessions, and it will be conducted as a seminar. Before each session, all students are expected to complete the required reading assignments in preparation for a lively and informed discussion in class. In addition, each student is expected to submit short response papers, which should include one's reactions, reflections, and questions for discussion. At each session, there will be a division of labor among students in summarizing the assigned readings and leading a discussion of them. The discussion will center on conceptual, analytical, and applied issues, whereas the instructor will serve as the moderator and a sounding board.
  • Course Goals: Political Science explains policies by investigating the political systems that produce them, spanning topics such as federalism, party politics, public opinion, and interest groups in different countries. The course will exemplify key relevant political science approaches to health politics, furnishing students with understanding of political science methods and key findings. Finally, a session will allow an in-depth discussion of political science as applied to research and policy analysis related to a chosen topic shared across the modules.
  • Competencies: To receive credit for the module, students are expected to attend all sessions, read the assigned articles, and provide feedback that demonstrates an understanding of the key points of the readings and discussion. The module is graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.
  • Learning Objectives: Students will gain an initial understanding of political science's place in understanding health policies. In particular, the students will be exposed to key political issues influencing health policy and the manners in which political scientists discuss and study them.

HMP806 Doctoral Seminar in Health Services and Systems Research IV

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Liang, Jersey Banaszak-Holl, Jane
  • Description: The economics module will provide an introduction to economic reasoning and methods and a sample of research topics that have been approached by economists working on health and health care. Readings will be a mix of classic papers and recent papers that illustrate this approach yet are accessible to both economists and students training in other disciplines.
  • Course Goals: To provide students with a familiarity with the theoretical and empirical approaches taken by economists working on health and health care, and with the types of questions that have received attention from the discipline, how those approaches and questions compare to those from other disciplines, and how to better understand, communicate with, and collaborate with members of other disciplines.
  • Competencies: This course will contribute to competencies in economic analysis and interdisciplinary analysis. How will students be evaluated, and how will grades be determined? 1) Have students lead presentations of papers. Each student not only leads discussion, but also prepares a short summary of the paper along with suggested questions for discussion. [50%] 2) Students identify a pair of papers, one in economics and the other in their own discipline (or for the economists, in the more general health services research literature). The papers should be paired by topic. The students would present the pair, and turn in a short, structured written assignment comparing the approaches of the two papers. [50%]
  • Learning Objectives: Students should gain a better understanding of the role economics has played in health services research and public health and be able to identify how the approaches and questions addressed by economists compare to those taken by researchers specializing in other social science disciplines.
  • Syllabus for HMP806

HMP809 Logic and Methods of Medical Care Research(Psych 809)

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s):
  • Description: Principles of the scientific method and the logic of the research process. The logic and methodologies of problem formulation, development of hypotheses and objectives, research design, sampling, operationalism and measurement, coding and analysis strategies. Primarily for doctoral students in Health Services Organization and Policy.

HMP815 Readings in Medical Care

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Liang, Jersey
  • Prerequisites: Perm Instr
  • Description: Directed readings in special areas. May be elected more than once. Primarily for doctoral students in Health Services Organization and Policy.

HMP826 Applied Econometrics in Health Services Research

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Norton, Edward
  • Prerequisites: Econ571 or equivalent
  • Description: Application of advanced econometric methods to health services research. Focuses on categorical data analysis, simultaneous equations, nonlinear expenditure models, duration models, and specification tests. Students will apply these techniques in weekly problems sets and an empirical term paper.
  • Syllabus for HMP826

HMP833 Research Topics in Sociology and Health Care Organization

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: HMP doctoral students or P.I.
  • Description: HSOP Program requirements. A topic in sociology and health care organization-policy is selected each term for detailed critical, theoretical, and methodological analysis leading to development, in class, of propositions aimed at advancing scientific status of the area of inquiry. Analysis and development of content follows logic of the research paradigm. Required of students with a sociology cognate in the doctoral program in Health Services Organization and Policy

HMP835 Research Practicum

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 3-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: HMP 809, Perm Instr
  • Description: The purpose of this course is to allow each student, early in his or her doctoral career, to gain experience in the actual performance of health services research. The experience will enable students to build sound research skills and to gain knowledge of the nature of inquiry in their discipline as well as in the field of health services research. Each student in the HSOP program is expected to elect a total of 6 credits in HMP 835.

HMP990 Dissertation/Precandidates

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to status as candidate.

HMP995 Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students admitted as candidates

NUTR510 Nutrition in the Life Cycle

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Olivia
  • Prerequisites: Introductory biology and introductory chemistry
  • Description: Nutrition in the Life Cycle will cover nutritional needs of individuals during critical stages of development. Students will learn about the biological basis for nutritional requirements in normal development and maintaining health in adulthood. Consequences of over- and under-nutrition and how to identify and address these issues will be discussed.
  • Course Goals: • Identify the macro- and micronutrients critical for normal human growth and development • Develop an understanding for the biological basis of nutrient requirements during pregnancy and lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and older adulthood (65+) • Recognize the health consequences of under or excess nutrient intake at critical life stages • Understand the rationale for development of dietary guidelines and major nutritional interventions • Understand how additional lifestyle factors (e.g., sleep, exercise) can affect nutrient requirements • Identify socioeconomic and cultural barriers to meeting nutrient needs • Develop an understanding of methodological aspects of the research regarding nutrition in the life cycle
  • Competencies: • Explain the importance of nutrient intake for normal human development and health maintenance throughout the life cycle • Apply biological knowledge of nutrient requirements during critical life stages to address health consequences of a nutrient imbalance • Explain the purpose of dietary guidelines in the United States • Discuss the justification for major nutritional interventions that have occurred in the United States to address health concerns due to nutritional imbalance • Evaluate lifestyle factors when considering nutritional needs of individuals across the life cycle • Demonstrate knowledge and awareness of barriers in our society that prevent individuals to meet nutritional needs • Demonstrate interpretation of methodological aspects and results of the research regarding nutrition in the life cycle
  • This course is cross-listed with PUBHLTH310.

NUTR540 Maternal and Child Nutrition

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Cole, Suzanne
  • Description: This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the nutritional requirements of pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Main topics include: physiologic and metabolic adaptations of pregnancy and lactation, maternal nutrition during pregnancy and lactation, composition of human milk and formula, feeding practices of infants and toddlers, and the nutrient requirements of infants, children, and adolescents. At the conclusion of this course, students will have gained a sufficient foundation in maternal and child nutrition to better understand the relevant scientific literature. Didactic lectures and guest presentations accompanied by class discussions will provide a breadth of maternal and child nutrition knowledge.

NUTR578 Practical Projects

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Practical Projects is the application of theory and principles of Nutritional Sciences to individual community-based public health settings. Course requirements include an approved practical project related to Nutritional Sciences in consultation with a faculty advisor. The experience is documented in an integrative paper demonstrating the scientific application of NS theories and principles to the practical project. May be elected more than once. Enrollment is limited to NS students with at least two full terms completed prior to registration.
  • Course Goals: To provide students with the opportunity to apply theory and principles of Nutritional Sciences to individual community-based public health settings.
  • Competencies: Depending upon the agency and type of work, the following competencies will be met: 1.Gather, evaluate and interpret nutrition information to assess, plan, implement, and evaluate food and nutrition programs. 2.Utilize appropriate nutritional assessment methods to prioritize nutrition concerns of individuals and target populations. 3.Assess populations in organizational and population-based settings through collection of quantitative and qualitative data. 4.Apply theoretical frameworks and research evidence to inform public health actions. 5.Apply epidemiologic and statistical methods to nutrition assessment, action, and/or evaluation.

NUTR585 Food Service Management

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Haas, Lindsay
  • Offered every year
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: Grad status
  • Description: This course examines the principles of food systems management, defing and applying management theories and functions in food and nutrition settings. Human, material and facility management will be discussed. Students gain an understanding of the tools available for managing effective and efficient food and nutrition organizations. Purchasing and inventory techniques will be examined. Using the foodservice systems model as a guide, it shows students how to transform the human, material, facility and operational inputs of the system into outputs of meals, customer satisfaction, employee satisfaction and financial accountability. This course will cover cost control, methods that are specific to managing food service operations, including food waste and theft.

NUTR626 Controversial topics in the role of nutrition on chronic disease

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Baylin, Ana
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600/503 or equivalent or and BIOSTAT 501/521 or equivalent
  • Description: This public health oriented course will provide students the opportunity to advance their knowledge in nutrition and chronic disease research from a population perspective and help them to better interpret epidemiologic studies on nutrition and chronic disease.
  • Course Goals: Introduce students to the current state of knowledge regarding nutrition and chronic disease.
  • Competencies: Demonstrate a working knowledge of the basic principles of nutrition research, including basic pathophysiology. Demonstrate ability to synthesize and interpret the scientific literature on nutrition and chronic disease. Understand methodological concepts on nutrition and chronic disease research. Be able to evaluate nutritional prevention strategies and dietary guidelines implemented to reduce the burden of chronic disease.
  • This course is cross-listed with EPID 625 in the Epidemiology department.

NUTR631 Metabolism of Vitamins & Minerals

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Cole, Suzanne
  • Prerequisites: EHS 630
  • Description: This course provides an in-depth introduction to vitamin and mineral metabolism with particular emphasis on nutrient bioavailability and absorption, transport and tissue accumulation, regulation of nutrient metabolism and homeostasis, and nutrient function. Other topics include the health effects of inadequate and excessive micronutrient intake, methods used to estimate nutrient requirements and establish nutrient intake reference and upper limit levels. The depth of micronutrient metabolism covered in this course will provide a sufficient background for students to better understand the scientific literature of individual micronutrients. The course will consist of lectures on the major metabolic/regulatory topics for each micronutrient as well as discussions of nutrient-related topics from the current scientific literature.

NUTR633 Evaluation of Global Nutrition Programs

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Jones, Andrew
  • Description: This course will provide students with an understanding of the principles of program evaluation with an emphasis on global nutrition programs. The course will create a space for discussion and practice in which knowledge can be applied to current global nutrition issues through research and critical analysis.
  • Course Goals: By the end of this course students are expected to be able to: 1) identify key principles related to the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of global nutrition interventions; 2) apply and synthesize these principles to develop a global nutrition intervention as well as a comprehensive, field-ready monitoring and evaluation plan; 3) formulate evaluation research questions based on a review of scientific literature; 4) develop an analysis plan for and analyze data from a publicly available global nutrition data set; 5) analyze evaluation research results published in a peer-reviewed document through the critical application of evidence-based evaluation principles; 6) communicate project narratives and research findings clearly, concisely and confidently in oral presentations to a group of peers in a professional setting; 7) lead and collaborate effectively as a member of a multidisciplinary team; 8) communicate in a professional manner with a "client" organization and identify how evaluation data would serve their needs; 9) conduct key informant interviews with stakeholders from a "client" organization; 10) engage in respectful classroom and online discussions with peers using scientific evidence to communicate and support diverse viewpoints.
  • Competencies: Upon completion of this course, students will have acquired experience in the following competencies: 1) understand key concepts and programs across the landscape of current global nutrition issues and interventions (aligned with Certificate in Global Health: Competency #1); 2) develop an appropriate global nutrition intervention and a plan for the monitoring and evaluation of the intervention (aligned with Certificate in Global Health: Competency #5); 3) apply epidemiological principles to the analysis of a quantitative data set in the public domain (aligned with Certificate in Global Health: Competency #3); 4) analyze and critically evaluate research results for making evidence-based policy recommendations; 5) communicate clearly and effectively in a professional setting of peers; 6) engage in respectful dialogue and collaborative teamwork with those of differing viewpoints and backgrounds.

NUTR637 Medical Nutrition Therapy II

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Han-Markey, Theresa
  • Prerequisites: EHS 636
  • Description: Applies nutrition support principles to various clinical disease states. Covers topics such as regulation of fluid and electrolytes in nutrition support, acid-base balance, and other aspects of parenteral nutrition. In addition, the pathophysiology and medical nutrition therapy for diabetes, renal and liver disease is taught.

NUTR646 Approaches in Nutrition Counseling

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Sonneville, Kendrin
  • Prerequisites: NUTR 636: Medical Nutrition Therapy I
  • Description: The aim of this course is to familiarize dietetics students with counseling strategies that can be used for nutrition behavior change. The course will emphasize both the art and the science of nutrition counseling, as well as the practical aspects of implementing counseling for dietary change.

NUTR650 Socio-ecological Approaches to Child and Adolescent Nutrition

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Bauer, Kate
  • Prerequisites: graduate student status,graduate student status
  • Description: This course utilizes a socio-ecological approach to provide a comprehensive introduction to issues and current debates related to public health nutrition among children and adolescents. Throughout the semester, woven through all of these topics, there will be extensive consideration of appropriate research methodologies and critical reading of current scientific literature.
  • Syllabus for NUTR650

NUTR651 Physical Activity and Nutrition

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mancuso, Peter
  • Prerequisites: NUTR 630 KINES 540,,NUTR 630 KINES 540,NUTR 630 KINES 540,,NUTR 630 KINES 540
  • Description: Students will learn about the impact of physical activity on the nutrition requirements in active individuals and special populations with chronic disease. Students will also learn how to use exercise and diet modification for weight loss and maintenance through lectures and hands on activities.
  • Course Goals: 1) To understand nutrition, fluid and electrolyte requirements in sport, exercise and recovery; 2) To describe safety considerations for exercise in untrained, aged, and chronically ill; 3) To develop exercise prescriptions and understand the unique nutrition requirements for individuals with chronic illness; and 4) Use body composition data to design nutrition plans and prescribe exercise for weight loss and maintenance
  • Competencies: Students who have completed this course will be able to: 1) Describe the macro-and micro-nutrient and fluid and electrolyte requirements for exercise and recovery; 2)Develop safety guidelines for exercise in the untrained, aged, and chronically ill; 3)Develop meal plans that meet the nutritional requirements for individuals who are healthy and clinical populations with chronic disease engaged in exercise programs;4) Develop exercise prescriptions for special clinical populations with chronic illness; and 5) Interpret body composition data in order to develop meal plans and prescribe exercise for weight loss and maintenance
  • This course is cross-listed with KINES 543 in the Kinesiology department.

NUTR657 Nutrition, the Environment, and Cancer

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Zick, Suzanna Colacino, Justin
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 502 or 522 or equivalent; EPID 503 or equivalent; and PHYSIO 502 or equivalent
  • Description: A large amount of research indicates that dietary and environmental factors impact the development and recurrence of various types of cancer. This course will survey both classic and emerging literature relevant to this topic in a structured discussion and journal club format.
  • Course Goals: The course will provide students with an opportunity to critically examine and discuss methodological issues around study design and analysis, to understand key concepts of, and to explore the biological mechanisms underlying the associations between diet, the environment, and cancer.,The course will provide students with an opportunity to critically examine and discuss methodological issues around study design and analysis, to understand key concepts of, and to explore the biological mechanisms underlying the associations between diet, the environment, and cancer.
  • Competencies: 1.) Identify sources of bias in nutrition and cancer research and anticipate their potential effects on estimates of association 2.) Weight evidence of the relationship between diet and cancer according to the relative methodological strength of scientific reports 3.) Understand the effects of timing, frequency, duration, and magnitude of exposure to nutrients and environmental exposures on the development of cancer. 4.) Link indicators used in epidemiological and clinical studies with the underlying biological processes they intend to measure. 5.) Integrate evidence from different sources into conceptual frames on nutrition, the environment, and cancer topics. 6.) Understand different strategies for analysis of epidemiological and clinical data in nutrition, the environment, and cancer research. 7.) Envision potential "next steps" to follow (what should be the next study) to build a complete conceptual frame on given cancer and nutrition or cancer and the environment topics.,1.) Identify sources of bias in nutrition and cancer research and anticipate their potential effects on estimates of association 2.) Weight evidence of the relationship between diet and cancer according to the relative methodological strength of scientific reports 3.) Understand the effects of timing, frequency, duration, and magnitude of exposure to nutrients and environmental exposures on the development of cancer. 4.) Link indicators used in epidemiological and clinical studies with the underlying biological processes they intend to measure. 5.) Integrate evidence from different sources into conceptual frames on nutrition, the environment, and cancer topics. 6.) Understand different strategies for analysis of epidemiological and clinical data in nutrition, the environment, and cancer research. 7.) Envision potential "next steps" to follow (what should be the next study) to build a complete conceptual frame on given cancer and nutrition or cancer and the environment topics.

NUTR677 Physical Growth and Maturation

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Peterson, Karen
  • Prerequisites: BIOS 513 or BIOS 523
  • Description: This course provides a comprehensive overview of the principles and methods to assess human physical growth and maturational tempo from conception through adolescence and among women of reproductive age. The selection, measurement, and interpretation of anthropometric indicators of growth and maturational tempo are discussed in detail. Public health applications are considered, including the use and limitations of reference growth curves; population trends in obesity, maturation, and stature; growth monitoring in the U.S. and in international public health settings and environmental influences on physical growth and maturation. Students will gain technical expertise in basic analysis and interpretation of growth data from population studies.
  • Course Goals: Gain knowledge of principles and methodological skills to assess human physical growth and maturation in key lifecycle periods relevant to public health research and practice in international and US settings,with emphasis on environmental health sciences and human nutrition.
  • Competencies: Understand characteristics of reference growth curves in US and international settings that affect interpretation of physical growth patterns and status in individuals and populations Understand indicators of physical growth and maturation in different lifecycle periods from conception to early adulthood/reproductive age Analyze and interpret physical growth measures in infants, children and adults in univariate and multivariable models Critically review literature on physical growth and maturation Apply methods to assess growth and maturation for a selected public health research or program setting
  • Learning Objectives: Characteristics of reference growth curves Interpretation of individual and population physical growth measures and indicators Selection and use of indicators of physical growth and maturational tempo across key lifecycle periods Determinants and sequelae of physical growth and maturation in key periods Analysis and interpretation growth data Interpret & critique literature on growth methods and applied research Application of indicators of growth and maturation in public health settings Application and interpretation of physical growth and maturation in environmental health sciences Integrate methods and apply to one lifecycle period

NUTR688 Research Topics in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Seo, Young-Ah
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course will introduce students to current topics in nutrition research. Students will attend seminars focused on research that will demonstrate the impact of nutrition on human health. Students are encouraged to pose questions to the speaker and write 5-7 bullet points that provide a summary of each presentation.

NUTR697 Readings in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Supervised study/review of a selected topic in nutritional sciences. May be elected more than once for a maximum of six credits.

NUTR698 Research in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Original research investigation of a special topic in nutritional sciences.

NUTR699 Masters Thesis in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm of Thesis Advisor
  • Description: This course shall be elected by students enrolled in Master's degree programs that require a formal written thesis as a condition of program completion. The thesis shall be defended in front of the student's thesis committee. The course grade will reflect the student's accomplishments relative to the thesis and its defense. The course is to be elected only once.

NUTR796 Special Topics in Nutritional Sciences

NUTR802 Professional Development and Technical Writing

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Sonneville, Kendrin
  • Prerequisites: EHS801
  • Description: Doctoral students must learn to think critically about their own writing, the writing of their peers, and the process of writing in general. This course will center on peer review, written critiques, and lectures from experts to build the skills necessary to craft a piece of writing with these elements.
  • Course Goals: At the end of the course, students should be able to: • Communicate public health research and its implications to a technical audience in a style that engages and connects with the reader. • Develop translatable writing skills for diverse career paths in science.
  • Competencies: Students taking this class are expected on its completion to: • Have a stronger grasp of the basic skills necessary for writing a scientific manuscript. • Understand the structure and expected content in scientific writing, including abstracts, reviews, and articles. • Understand how to critique the writing style, content, organization, and logic in their own and their peers' writing. • Take and give criticism constructively and use it to improve their writing. • Have a polished piece of writing that they can either submit for publication or use for their preliminary exam. • Have developed a regular writing routine that is productive for them.

NUTR803 Effective Teaching in Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Olivia
  • Description: Students will engage in a community of graduate students to explore/prepare for a faculty career, focusing on teaching at a university-level specifically in the public health field. Students will immerse in literature, discussion, and workshops on state-of-the-art pedagogical techniques. Course tangibles include: teaching philosophy statement, course syllabus, and teaching demonstration.
  • Course Goals: 1. Reflect on your own teaching practice; 2. Engage in conversations about teaching and faculty life with faculty and peers; 3. Design a specific course under your nutrition expertise that you could teach at a university institution; 4. Apply research-based inclusive teaching strategies to your teaching-related documents - a teaching philosophy, syllabus, lecture material; 5. Understand the purpose of different types of student learning assessment and apply them to your newly designed course; 6. Identify strategies for success in higher education for your diverse student body
  • Competencies: 1. Articulate your knowledge of effective pedagogical techniques to colleagues and future employers, both in writing and in discussion 2. Exhibit your teaching values and beliefs through course documents (e.g, syllabus, assignments, etc.) 3. Demonstrate your teaching strategies, values, and beliefs through actively practicing teaching 4. Demonstrate your ability incorporate inclusivity in the classroom setting 5. Establish the ability to actively seek feedback to meet and exceed teaching expectations at an institute of higher education
  • This course is cross-listed with PUBHLTH803.

NUTR899 Advanced Research in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Must be a PhD student in Nutritional Sciences
  • Description: Original investigations of a specific research topic in Nutritional Sciences. Designed for doctoral students performing research prior to passing their qualifying exams. Students will complete two separate rotations with faculty members for a minimum of 1 credit each. This course may be elected more than once.
  • Course Goals: Expose PhD students to Nutritional Sciences research opportunities in order to assist students in exploring interest areas and a dissertation topic.
  • Competencies: To be determined with the faculty member and the student based upon the research rotation.

NUTR990 Dissertation Research/Pre-Candidate

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Nutritional Sciences Doctoral Student
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to status as a candidate.

NUTR995 Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Nutritional Sciences Doctoral Student
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student who has been admitted to status as a candidate

PUBHLTH200 Health and Society: Introduction to Public Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Kennedy, Sheela
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description:

    This course is intended to serve as an introduction to the major issues of public health with a focus on the United States, although global health issues are considered as well. We will examine what those issues are, what determines them, and how they can be altered. As a survey of the entire field of public health, the course provides a broad overview for students wishing no more than an introduction to the field, as well as good grounding for students who wish to pursue additional coursework in public health.

    The winter term offering is a blended learning course. It combines online content and activities with face-to-face learning.

    This course is a prerequisite for admission to the undergraduate degree program in Public Health. This course satisfies LSA's Race and Ethnicity requirement and counts as 4 credits towards LSA’s Social Science requirement.

  • Course Goals: The course should provide a broad overview for students wishing no more than an introduction to the field, as well as good grounding for students who wish to pursue additional coursework in the subject.
  • Competencies: The specific course objectives are expressed within the following competencies:
    1. Students will be able to identify the principal determinants of health and disease, including the determinants of inequalities in the health of groups differentiated by race, ethnicity, and economic status.
    2. Students will be able to explain what public health is, what distinguishes it from the other health sciences, and what unique contributions it has to make to the health of the public.
    3. Students will understand when governments should intervene in matters pertaining to the health of the public and when they should not. They will be able to describe the major formal organizational structures within the United States responsible for monitoring and improving the public's health.
    4. Students will be able to describe the basic approaches and purposes of the two major analytical methods of public health, epidemiology and biostatistics, without achieving mastery of the methods (i.e., this is not a methods course; that is the subject of other courses).
    5. Students will be able to explain the biomedical basis of infectious and chronic diseases and congenital abnormalities, again without developing detailed expertise on these subjects.
    6. Students will be able to identify the principal social and behavioral determinants of health and demonstrate how they come into influence the most important behavior-related health problems of the day.
    7. Students will be able to identify the principal environmental determinants of health and describe the major environmental health issues of the present time.
    8. Students will be able to explain the role of public health in medical care and identify the principal problems in the U.S. health care system.
    9. Students will be able to itemize critical issues in global health, with a special focus on health in poor countries.
  • Learning Objectives: To give undergraduates a good understanding of what is really important in public health, what determines health, and how society influences health.
  • This course is cross-listed with Pubpol 210 in the Ford School department.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH200

PUBHLTH300 Behavioral and Social Foundations for the Health Professions

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Strecher, Vic
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course provides an introduction to the behavioral and social science factors that influence health and disease, with an emphasis on relevant knowledge for helping individuals make better health-related decisions and changes in their lives. The course explores these factors from the individual to the societal level. The course is 4 credits, with 3 hours of lecture and a 1 hour discussion per week.
  • Course Goals: The overall goal of this course is to provide an introduction to the behavioral and social science foundations for the health professions, and relevant grounding for students who wish to pursue additional training in the area.
  • Competencies:

    By the end of the course, students will possess greater understanding of the following areas in their relation to health behavior development, change, and decision-making:

    1. Causes of death in the U.S. and the world,
    2. methods of determining causes of death and disease,
    3. risk and risk perception,
    4. approaches to helping and coping,
    5. theories and conceptual frameworks,
    6. measurement of psychosocial factors,
    7. motivation, self-efficacy and self-control,
    8. physical, social, cultural environments,
    9. clinician-patient communication,
    10. mass and interactive communication,
    11. information processing,
    12. roles of health care organizations, health plans, employers, schools, and governments,
    13. roles of health care reform and health informatics, and
    14. roles of values affirmation, energy, and life purpose.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH300

PUBHLTH310 Nutrition in the life cycle

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Olivia
  • Description: Nutrition in the Life Cycle will cover nutritional needs of individuals during critical stages of development. Students will learn about the biological basis for nutritional requirements in normal development and maintaining health in adulthood. Consequences of over- and under-nutrition and how to identify and address these issues will be discussed.
  • Course Goals:
    1. Identify the macro- and micronutrients critical for normal human growth and development; Develop an understanding for the biological basis of nutrient requirements during pregnancy and lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and older adulthood (65+)
    2. Recognize the health consequences of under or excess nutrient intake at critical life stages
    3. Understand the rationale for development of dietary guidelines and major nutritional interventions
    4. Understand how additional lifestyle factors (e.g., sleep, exercise) can affect nutrient requirements
    5. Identify socioeconomic and cultural barriers to meeting nutrient needs
  • Competencies:
    1. Explain the importance of nutrient intake for normal human development and health maintenance throughout the life cycle
    2. Apply biological knowledge of nutrient requirements during critical life stages to address health consequences of a nutrient imbalance
    3. Explain the purpose of dietary guidelines in the United States
    4. Discuss the justification for major nutritional interventions that have occurred in the United States to address health concerns due to nutritional imbalance
    5. Evaluate lifestyle factors when considering nutritional needs of individuals across the life cycle
    6. Demonstrate knowledge and awareness of barriers in our society that prevent individuals to meet nutritional needs
  • This course is cross-listed with A NUTR 500-level course.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH310

PUBHLTH340 Sustainability and Environmental Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Batterman, Stuart Jolliet, Olivier Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course links environmental health and sustainability issues with the goal of developing sustainable strategies. It addresses environmental health determinants, underlying drivers and stressors, environmental metrics, exposures and impacts, assessment tools, and sustainable solutions. These concepts are applied to sustainable and healthy cities, transportation, food, energy, and consumer product systems.
  • Course Goals: 1. To understand the major risk factors that affect human and global environmental health. 2. To critically identify key drivers, stresses and health impacts associated with main domains of consumption and human activity. 3. To understand the analytical methods and underlying science used to evaluate sustainability, assess human health impacts, and contrast footprints (e.g., for carbon, water). 4. To be able to formulate the key principles leading towards sustainable and healthy solutions for the major domains of consumption and human activity.
  • Competencies: The proposed course will enable students: 1) To be able to identify major human health risk factors and their underlying causes, including environmental and nutritional determinant factors that impact human health status; 2) To be able to define, analyze and interpret principles of sustainable production and consumption in specific domains; 3) To be able to apply life cycle-based footprint tools and other metrics to quantify sustainability and health impact of products, organizations, and systems; and 4) To be able to define sustainability goals, interpret appropriate metrics, and apply problem solving skills at organizational or corporate levels.
  • Learning Objectives: *This course contributes in particular to the following undergraduate competencies and program domains: a) Science of Exposure and Human Health: it explains the underlying sciences and relationship between sustainable consumption and human health, proposing environmental metrics, exposure and impact assessment tools, and addressing opportunities for preventing impacts and protecting health across the life course. b) Determinants of Health: This course describes the underlying drivers and stressors, as well as the environmental health and nutritional determinant factors that impact human health status. c) Problem Solving: Student will develop and apply problem-solving skills to develop sustainable solutions applicable to sustainable and healthy cities, transportation, food, energy, and consumer product systems.

PUBHLTH382 Population Health Determinants & Disparities

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mehdipanah, Roshanak
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH200
  • Description: This course explores the social and environmental factors that impact disease susceptibility across populations. Students will learn of the complexities and interactions of factors that influence patterns of disease and health at multiple levels. The course will introduce key analytic frameworks and metrics for evaluating public health problems.
  • Course Goals: The goal of this course is to provide students with the foundations on determinants of health and how they contribute to health inequities among different population groups.
  • Competencies: 1. Define population health within the context of public health 2. Describe the importance of context in understanding population health 3. Explain the nature of health and disease at individual and societal levels 4. Identify how health is defined culturally and describe how cultural factors influence health 5. Identify key risk factors at multiple behavioral and genetic levels 6. Distinguish health disparities in relation to race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, geographic location, and other socio-economic dimensions 7. Critically apply key concepts and analytic frameworks to address population health issues 8. Describe the role of data in assessing, describing and evaluating the complex interactions among multiple determinants of health and disease
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Define population health within the context of public health 2. Describe the importance of context in understanding population health 3. Explain the nature of health and disease at individual and societal levels 4. Identify how health is defined culturally and describe how cultural factors influence health 5. Identify key risk factors at multiple behavioral and genetic levels 6. Distinguish health disparities in relation to race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, geographic location, and other socio-economic dimensions 7. Critically apply key concepts and analytic frameworks to address population health issues 8. Describe the role of data in assessing, describing and evaluating the complex interactions among multiple determinants of health and disease

PUBHLTH383 Data Driven Solutions in Public Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Kidwell, Kelley Staff
  • Prerequisites: STAT250; PUBHLTH 200
  • Description: This course introduces the importance of data in public health, including collection, analysis, interpretations, and dissemination. It provides examples of data used to evaluate public health decisions, policy and resource allocation. It is an introduction to biostatistical and epidemiological methods, informatics, and big data including usage, management and challenges.
  • Course Goals: To introduce students to the importance of data in public health, including its collection, analysis, interpretations and dissemination. To provide examples of how data are used to evaluate and assess public health decisions, policy and resource allocation. To introduce students to critical thinking of public health studies and media reports.
  • Competencies: By the end of this course students should be able to: 1)Identify key strategies and methods for obtaining current public health data 2)Explain the use of basic epidemiological methods in study design and implementation to generate new data and metrics to address public health issues 3)Illustrate how analyses and results are used to inform intervention development and influence appropriate public health policies. 4)Apply statistical methods in order to describe data, make inferences and test hypotheses regarding population parameters 5)Apply results from data analyses to explore, define, identify and prioritize public health challenges and solutions
  • Learning Objectives: 1)Identify key strategies and methods for obtaining current public health data 2)Explain the use of basic epidemiological methods in study design and implementation to generate new data and metrics to address public health issues 3)Illustrate how analyses and results are used to inform intervention development and influence appropriate public health policies. 4)Apply statistical methods in order to describe data, make inferences and test hypotheses regarding population parameters 5)Apply results from data analyses to explore, define, identify and prioritize public health challenges and solutions
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH383

PUBHLTH402 Changing Health Behaviors: What Works

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff Piette, John
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH 200
  • Description: This course gives undergraduate students an introduction to how brief interventions are used to impact health behaviors and the approaches used to help people make and attain behavior-change goals. Students also gain skills in applying scientific evidence from randomized trials and systematic reviews in public health decision-making.
  • Course Goals: 1) Know what brief behavioral interventions are and how they are delivered to address behavioral challenges 2) Know where to look for evidence supporting the effectiveness of brief interventions 3) Be able to review, interpret, and apply evidence from randomized trials, systematic reviews, and guidelines 4) Understand what types of brief interventions have the strongest evidence and for whom they work
  • Competencies: a) Identify theories, concepts and models from a range of social and behavior science disciplines that are used in public health research and practice involving multiple levels of change (e.g., individual, family, organization, community, and society). b) Describe overlap between current models and frameworks, and their limitations c) Describe how theory is useful in understanding why individuals do or do not engage in health behaviors. d) Understand the merits of using theory to inform interventions and their evaluation in public health. e) Describe some of the benefits and challenges of using social and behavioral theories and models to inform programs and policies involving multiple levels of change (e.g. individual, family, organization, community). f)Describe key adaptations and challenges in applying theories and frameworks to conduct public health research and practice across cultures and in resource poor settings.
  • Learning Objectives: 1) Know what brief behavioral interventions are and how they are delivered to address behavioral challenges 2) Know where to look for evidence supporting the effectiveness of brief interventions 3) Be able to review, interpret, and apply evidence from randomized trials, systematic reviews, and guidelines 4) Understand what types of brief interventions have the strongest evidence and for whom they work
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH402

PUBHLTH413 Vaccines in Public Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Yang, Zhenhua
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH370 or EPID512
  • Description: This course introduces essential vaccinology, covering pre-clinical vaccine development, clinical trials, new vaccine licensing, immunization program design and evaluation. It also introduces population transmission dynamics concepts, and the impact of pathogen and human population diversity on vaccination. Recent advancements in major types of non-infectious vaccines will also be discussed.
  • Course Goals:
    1. To introduces the students to the history and evolution of vaccinology, and the principles and methods of epidemiology, statistics, microbiology, immunology, and genetics used in vaccine development and immunization program design.
    2. To introduce the students to the general procedures for new vaccine development and licensure, including the different phases of clinical trials of new vaccines.
    3. To introduces the students to the concepts of population transmission dynamics, and the impact of pathogen and human population genetic diversity on vaccine development.
    4. To expose the students to the new frontiers of vaccines - development of vaccines for major types of non-infectious diseases.
  • Competencies:

    Although there is no official competencies that have been established for the new public health undergraduate program, this course addresses, partially or substantially, a number of BS in Public Health Sciences Requirements, which include:

    • Gain an understanding of the natural history of infectious and chronic diseases, their environmental and biological origins, their distributions among populations, and strategies for their prevention and management.
    • Examine and explore multiple aspects of infectious and chronic diseases, including socio-economic, behavioral, biological, environmental, and structural factors that contribute to their origin and distribution among populations.
    • Understand the basic biology, transmission, and natural history of important human infectious and chronic diseases.
    • Examine methodologies that are used in public health to study the underlying causes and impact of various aspects of infectious and chronic diseases, including surveillance, epidemiological investigations, and mathematical modeling.
    • Explore multi-tiered public health strategies for the prevention, treatment, and potential eradication of infectious and chronic diseases.
  • Learning Objectives:
    1. To gain an understanding of how new knowledge generated from epidemiological studies from different populations, basic biomedical science research, and health policy assessment, along with the development of new technology, can jointly inform and impact the development of new vaccines for the prevention of different types of diseases, including both infectious and non-infectious diseases.
    2. to be familiar with the essential steps involved in developing a new vaccine.
    3. to understand important factors that affect the efficacy, effectiveness, and the public acceptance of vaccination.
  • This course is cross-listed with EPID 513 in the Epidemiology Department department.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH413

PUBHLTH460 Introduction to Bacterial Pathogenesis

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Marrs, Carl F
  • Prerequisites: Pubhlth 370 or Bio 207, AND Pubhlth 311 or Bio 305
  • Description: Microbial structures and their relation to basic mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis; structure, function, and genetics of bacterial toxins; and host resistance and immunity. Discussions of pathogenic organisms of major public health importance, diseases caused, and their epidemiology.
  • Course Goals: The goals of this course are to have the students gain a basic understanding of the kinds of virulence factors used by pathogenic bacteria to cause disease, how we discover and study those traits, and how we can make use of this knowledge for treatment and prevention of bacterial diseases.
  • Competencies: 1. Understand the role played by bacteria in human health and disease. 2. Understand how genetic transfer mechanisms can lead to bacteria with increased virulence and antibiotic resistance. 3. Understand how bacterial toxins and other virulence factors help bacteria cause disease. 4. Understand public health approaches to preventing bacterial diseases. 5. Understand how antibiotics kill bacteria and how bacteria become resistant to them.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Understand the role played by bacteria in human health and disease. 2. Understand how genetic transfer mechanisms can lead to bacteria with increased virulence and antibiotic resistance. 3. Understand how bacterial toxins and other virulence factors help bacteria cause disease. 4. Understand public health approaches to preventing bacterial diseases. 5. Understand how antibiotics kill bacteria and how bacteria become resistant to them.
  • This course is cross-listed with Epid 460 in the Epidemiology, SPH department.

PUBHLTH477 Readings in Public Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Youatt, Emily Staff
  • Description: Review of literature or directed readings on selected topic related to one or more areas of public health.
  • Course Goals: The goals of this course are to: 1. Introduce students to peer-reviewed literature in public health 2. Improve students' ability to locate, use, evaluate, and synthesize public health information
  • Competencies: None (see objectives and program learning domains)
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of the term, students should be able to find and appropriately interpret and critically evaluate the findings in peer-reviewed scientific literature.

PUBHLTH478 Practical Projects in Public Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff Youatt, Emily
  • Description: Practical projects allows undergraduate students to explore community-based public health settings. Project must be related to public health practice and developed in consultation with a faculty advisor. Students will write an integrative paper analyzing the organization's role in the public health system and critically reflecting on their experience.
  • Course Goals: To provide students an opportunity to engage with local-level public health professionals and organizations that engage in public health practice.
  • Competencies: None/see learning objectives and program domains
  • Learning Objectives: As part of this course students will consider the following concepts: 1. Health promotion at a population level 2. Community dynamics and the cultural context in which public health professionals work 3. Organizational structure and dynamics, including the organization's role in the public health system 4. How to operate professionally in a public health organization (including but not limited to: personal work ethic, professionalism, teamwork, and leadership)

PUBHLTH479 Independent Research in Public Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Youatt, Emily
  • Description: Students conduct independent research on a specific public health topic under the supervision of a public health faculty member.
  • Course Goals: The goals of this course are to: 1. Introduce undergraduate students to public health research; 2. Provide students an opportunity to gain experience conducting public health research; 3. Improve students' ability to communicate public health information in written form; 4. Improve students' ability to locate, use, evaluate, and synthesize public health information.
  • Competencies: Please see above course goals
  • Learning Objectives: After completing this course, students will: 1. Understand how to form a research question; 2. Be able to identify relevant literature or data sources to address a research question; 3. Better understand the role of data in understanding public health problems.

PUBHLTH503 Service Learning for Health Professionals

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mason, Nancy
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Description: An interdisciplinary service-based course required for all pharmacy students and elective for students of other health science disciplines. Learning experiences will focus on social justice and professional responsibilities for civic engagement. Through class participation, reflection, and guided discussions, students will explore issues of health disparities, poverty, and the medically under-served. Students participate in community service in addition to regular classroom discussion sessions.
  • This course is cross-listed with .

PUBHLTH615 Public Health in Action: National

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor
  • Description: An intensive course to prepare students for a culminating week-long practice-based experience designed to address existing and emerging public health priorities as defined by the respective communities and their academic partners. Students will be engaged directly with communities and exposed to the contextual, cultural, political and economic factors impacting health.
  • Course Goals: Course Goal: To provide an action-based experience for public health graduate students to address 'real time' public health issues in vulnerable communities. Course Objectives: 1.Provide students with the opportunity to develop and apply theoretical and practical skills to current public health issues impacting the well being of communities. 2.Actively engage and immerse students as partners in surfacing information, data and solutions in response to the today's public health challenges. 3.Strengthen student understanding of how public health science and practice can be used to meaningfully address complex population health issues in communities. 4.Develop skills in working with and in diverse communities.
  • Competencies: SPH Cross-Cutting Competencies: -Describe the role of structural inequality in producing health disparities -Demonstrate effective written and oral skills for communicating with different audiences in the context of professional public health activities. -Demonstrate team building, negotiation and conflict management skills. -Appreciate the importance of working collaboratively with diverse communities and constituencies (e.g. researchers, practitioners, agencies and organizations). Core Competencies, Academic Public Health Linkages: 1A1. Identifies the health status of populations and their related determinants of health and illness (e.g., factors contributing to health promotion and disease prevention, the quality, availability and use of health services). 1A2. Describes the characteristics of a population-based health problem (e.g., equity, social determinants, environment) 4A2. Recognizes the role of cultural, social, and behavioral factors in the accessibility, availability, acceptability and delivery of public health services 4A2. Recognizes the role of cultural, social, and behavioral factors in the accessibility, availability, acceptability and delivery of public health services 3A2. Communicates in writing and orally, in person, and through electronic means, with linguistic and cultural proficiency 3A3. Solicits community-based input from individuals and organizations 2A4. Gathers information that will inform policy decisions (e.g., health, fiscal, administrative, legal, ethical, social, political) 3A2. Communicates in writing and orally, in person, and through electronic means, with linguistic and cultural proficiency 3A2. Communicates in writing and orally, in person, and through electronic means, with linguistic and cultural proficiency 5A1. Recognizes community linkages and relationships among multiple factors (or determinants) affecting health (e.g., The Socio-Ecological Model) 8A1. Incorporates ethical standards of practice as the basis of all interactions with organizations, communities, and individuals

PUBHLTH616 Public Health in Action: International

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Permission by Instructor
  • Description: An intensive course to prepare students for a culminating week-long international practice-based experience designed to address existing and emerging public health priorities as defined by the respective communities and their academic partners. Students will be engaged directly and exposed to the contextual, cultural, political and economic factors impacting health.

PUBHLTH622 Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Public Health: New Business Models for a public health economy

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Verhey-Henke, Ann
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course builds on the premise that in order to improve the public's health, we need to create a new economy - a public health economy. To develop new business models for improving public health we need to understand the role innovation plays in business generally and startup culture specifically.
  • Course Goals: 1. Gain an understanding of the business model canvas and deep understanding of the value proposition canvas and customer segments section. 2. Develop understanding of various team roles in a startup as well as other non-staff support including developing an effective board, and advisors. 3. Develop basic understanding of sales, lead generation and how to acquire early customers. 4. Gain basic understanding of incorporation, set your venture up for investment and understand various options for financing. 5. Learn what it means to develop a scalable business 6. Gain basic understanding of the pathways for technology and other product development, including the importance of design.
  • Competencies: Field Knowledge & Assessment Domain: Financial analysis Organizational Vision Strategic Orientation Organizational Awareness Use legal reasoning Communication Domain: Convey Listen Collaborate Professional Development Domain: Actively seek feedback from others Develop an accurate view of own strengths Continuously push self Address knowledge, skills, and other developmental gaps Establish, build, and sustain a network for professional development. Leadership Domain: Accountability Change Leadership Impact and Influence Behave ethically

PUBHLTH741 Interdisciplinary Problem Solving

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: "Interdisciplinary Problem Solving" is a course offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). Through a team-based, experiential, and interdisciplinary learning model, small groups of U-M graduate and professional students work with faculty to explore and offer solutions to emerging, complex problems.
  • Course Goals: Will vary term to term
  • Competencies: Will vary term to term
  • Learning Objectives: Will vary term to term
  • This course is cross-listed with LAW741/PUBPOL710/SW741 in the Law School, Public Policy, Social Work department.

PUBHLTH796 Special Topics in Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-5 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course will be used by faculty members to teach special or emerging topics related to Public Health. The specific material and format will vary by semester and instructor.
  • Course Goals: Will vary by topic and instructor.
  • Competencies: Will vary by topic and instructor.
  • Learning Objectives: Will vary by topic and instructor.