Undergraduate Courses

PUBHLTH200 Health and Society: Introduction to Public Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Kennedy, Sheela
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description:

    This course is intended to serve as an introduction to the major issues of public health with a focus on the United States, although global health issues are considered as well. We will examine what those issues are, what determines them, and how they can be altered. As a survey of the entire field of public health, the course provides a broad overview for students wishing no more than an introduction to the field, as well as good grounding for students who wish to pursue additional coursework in public health.

    The winter term offering is a blended learning course. It combines online content and activities with face-to-face learning.

    This course is a prerequisite for admission to the undergraduate degree program in Public Health. This course satisfies LSA's Race and Ethnicity requirement and counts as 4 credits towards LSA’s Social Science requirement.

  • Course Goals: The course should provide a broad overview for students wishing no more than an introduction to the field, as well as good grounding for students who wish to pursue additional coursework in the subject.
  • Competencies: The specific course objectives are expressed within the following competencies:
    1. Students will be able to identify the principal determinants of health and disease, including the determinants of inequalities in the health of groups differentiated by race, ethnicity, and economic status.
    2. Students will be able to explain what public health is, what distinguishes it from the other health sciences, and what unique contributions it has to make to the health of the public.
    3. Students will understand when governments should intervene in matters pertaining to the health of the public and when they should not. They will be able to describe the major formal organizational structures within the United States responsible for monitoring and improving the public's health.
    4. Students will be able to describe the basic approaches and purposes of the two major analytical methods of public health, epidemiology and biostatistics, without achieving mastery of the methods (i.e., this is not a methods course; that is the subject of other courses).
    5. Students will be able to explain the biomedical basis of infectious and chronic diseases and congenital abnormalities, again without developing detailed expertise on these subjects.
    6. Students will be able to identify the principal social and behavioral determinants of health and demonstrate how they come into influence the most important behavior-related health problems of the day.
    7. Students will be able to identify the principal environmental determinants of health and describe the major environmental health issues of the present time.
    8. Students will be able to explain the role of public health in medical care and identify the principal problems in the U.S. health care system.
    9. Students will be able to itemize critical issues in global health, with a special focus on health in poor countries.
  • Learning Objectives: To give undergraduates a good understanding of what is really important in public health, what determines health, and how society influences health.
  • This course is cross-listed with Pubpol 210 in the Ford School department.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH200

PUBHLTH300 Behavioral and Social Foundations for the Health Professions

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Strecher, Vic
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course provides an introduction to the behavioral and social science factors that influence health and disease, with an emphasis on relevant knowledge for helping individuals make better health-related decisions and changes in their lives. The course explores these factors from the individual to the societal level. The course is 4 credits, with 3 hours of lecture and a 1 hour discussion per week.
  • Course Goals: The overall goal of this course is to provide an introduction to the behavioral and social science foundations for the health professions, and relevant grounding for students who wish to pursue additional training in the area.
  • Competencies:

    By the end of the course, students will possess greater understanding of the following areas in their relation to health behavior development, change, and decision-making:

    1. Causes of death in the U.S. and the world,
    2. methods of determining causes of death and disease,
    3. risk and risk perception,
    4. approaches to helping and coping,
    5. theories and conceptual frameworks,
    6. measurement of psychosocial factors,
    7. motivation, self-efficacy and self-control,
    8. physical, social, cultural environments,
    9. clinician-patient communication,
    10. mass and interactive communication,
    11. information processing,
    12. roles of health care organizations, health plans, employers, schools, and governments,
    13. roles of health care reform and health informatics, and
    14. roles of values affirmation, energy, and life purpose.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH300

PUBHLTH305 The Environment And Human Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Rozek, Laura
  • Offered every year
  • Description: This course introduces major issues of environmental health science. We will examine what those issues are, what determines them, and how they can be altered. The course provides an overview for students who want an introduction to environmental health as well as students planning to pursue additional environmental health coursework.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH305

PUBHLTH310 Nutrition in the life cycle

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Olivia
  • Description: Nutrition in the Life Cycle will cover nutritional needs of individuals during critical stages of development. Students will learn about the biological basis for nutritional requirements in normal development and maintaining health in adulthood. Consequences of over- and under-nutrition and how to identify and address these issues will be discussed.
  • Course Goals:
    1. Identify the macro- and micronutrients critical for normal human growth and development; Develop an understanding for the biological basis of nutrient requirements during pregnancy and lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and older adulthood (65+)
    2. Recognize the health consequences of under or excess nutrient intake at critical life stages
    3. Understand the rationale for development of dietary guidelines and major nutritional interventions
    4. Understand how additional lifestyle factors (e.g., sleep, exercise) can affect nutrient requirements
    5. Identify socioeconomic and cultural barriers to meeting nutrient needs
  • Competencies:
    1. Explain the importance of nutrient intake for normal human development and health maintenance throughout the life cycle
    2. Apply biological knowledge of nutrient requirements during critical life stages to address health consequences of a nutrient imbalance
    3. Explain the purpose of dietary guidelines in the United States
    4. Discuss the justification for major nutritional interventions that have occurred in the United States to address health concerns due to nutritional imbalance
    5. Evaluate lifestyle factors when considering nutritional needs of individuals across the life cycle
    6. Demonstrate knowledge and awareness of barriers in our society that prevent individuals to meet nutritional needs
  • This course is cross-listed with A NUTR 500-level course.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH310

PUBHLTH311 Introduction to Public Health Genetics

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Marrs, Carl F
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Course designed for those with limited exposure to biology who are interested in human genetics. Will include basics of genetics at both the molecular and population level, plus some ethical, legal, and social implications of genetics research will be examined. Examples relevant to public health will be emphasized.
  • Course Goals: The goal of this course is to teach the basics of genetics so that students who successfully complete the course will be prepared to take any additional courses that have introductory genetics as a prerequisite.
  • Competencies: Course Learning Outcomes: 1) Describe how the concepts of Mendel are relevant to human genetic diseases. 2) Understand the fundamental mechanisms of how genetic information is transmitted from one generation to the next. 3) Understand how the genetic information is translated into the materials needed to create the body and allow it to function. 4) Understand the different types of mutations that can occur and their consequences. 5) Analyze how variations in populations affect our abilities to determine the genetic elements involved in disease. 6) Describe the role genetic changes play in cancer development. 7) Understand the role of genetic screening and testing in public health and medicine. 8) Discuss some of the ethical, legal and social issues associated with human genetics.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH311

PUBHLTH340 Sustainability and Environmental Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Batterman, Stuart; Jolliet, Olivier; Staff;
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course links environmental health and sustainability issues with the goal of developing sustainable strategies. It addresses environmental health determinants, underlying drivers and stressors, environmental metrics, exposures and impacts, assessment tools, and sustainable solutions. These concepts are applied to sustainable and healthy cities, transportation, food, energy, and consumer product systems.
  • Course Goals: 1. To understand the major risk factors that affect human and global environmental health. 2. To critically identify key drivers, stresses and health impacts associated with main domains of consumption and human activity. 3. To understand the analytical methods and underlying science used to evaluate sustainability, assess human health impacts, and contrast footprints (e.g., for carbon, water). 4. To be able to formulate the key principles leading towards sustainable and healthy solutions for the major domains of consumption and human activity.
  • Competencies: The proposed course will enable students: 1) To be able to identify major human health risk factors and their underlying causes, including environmental and nutritional determinant factors that impact human health status; 2) To be able to define, analyze and interpret principles of sustainable production and consumption in specific domains; 3) To be able to apply life cycle-based footprint tools and other metrics to quantify sustainability and health impact of products, organizations, and systems; and 4) To be able to define sustainability goals, interpret appropriate metrics, and apply problem solving skills at organizational or corporate levels.
  • Learning Objectives: *This course contributes in particular to the following undergraduate competencies and program domains: a) Science of Exposure and Human Health: it explains the underlying sciences and relationship between sustainable consumption and human health, proposing environmental metrics, exposure and impact assessment tools, and addressing opportunities for preventing impacts and protecting health across the life course. b) Determinants of Health: This course describes the underlying drivers and stressors, as well as the environmental health and nutritional determinant factors that impact human health status. c) Problem Solving: Student will develop and apply problem-solving skills to develop sustainable solutions applicable to sustainable and healthy cities, transportation, food, energy, and consumer product systems.

PUBHLTH350 Global Public Health: Challenges and Transformations

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Boulton, Matthew
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course integrates foundational principles of political science and international studies in an exploration of epidemiological transitions, goal-setting in international organizations, and other global public health challenges. Students will investigate health disparities between countries and between socioeconomic groups within a country, and will discuss key communicable and non-communicable health conditions.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH350

PUBHLTH360 Community, Culture, and Social Justice (CCSJ) in Public Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Harper, Gary
  • Description: Students will explore social constructions of health, and examine the interplay of community, cultural, ethical, social, economic, environmental, political and social justice forces that shape health. Concepts of community, culture, and social justice will be explored and students will examine how these concepts can be applied to public health interventions.
  • Course Goals: Students will be able to evaluate and critique how the concepts of community, culture and social justice are applied to public health interventions.
  • Competencies: By the end of this course students should be able to: 1. Describe various social constructions of health both locally and globally. 2. Describe how community, cultural, ethical, social, economic, environmental, political and social justice forces shape human health both locally and globally using a social determinants of health framework. 3. Compare and contrast the concepts of health disparities, health inequalities, and health inequities. 4. Examine a public health intervention using a critical analysis approach. 5. Compare various meanings of community, culture, and social justice that are used in public health and other related disciplines. 6. Critique the ways in which the concepts of community, culture, and social justice are applied to public health interventions both locally and globally.

PUBHLTH370 Public Health Biology and Pathophysiology

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Karvonen-Gutierrez, Carrie
  • Prerequisites: None.
  • Description: This course provides a foundation of biology and pathophysiology concepts necessary for the practice of public health including an evaluation of the natural history and mechanisms underlying infectious and chronic human diseases. This course will also address population-level targets for prevention and treatment of major diseases of human health.
  • Course Goals: The goals of this course are to provide students with a fundamental understanding of the biology and pathophysiology underlying major human diseases which cause significant morbidity or mortality and to develop an appreciation for the role of public health in the prevention, identification, and treatment of human disease.
  • Competencies: The course outcomes are focused upon the following learning objectives: 1. Understand the role of structure and function in the regulation of normal physiology; 2. Describe national and global trends in morbidity and mortality; 3. Describe the natural history and physiology of diseases of high importance to public health; 4. Specify the role of the immune system in population health; 5. Identify important behavioral, environmental, and infectious risk factors for diseases of public health importance; 6. Discuss the interactions of genetics and environmental factors in disease causation; 7. Apply biological principles to the development and implementation of disease prevention, control, or management programs; 8. Integrate general scientific and laboratory concepts into public health research and practice.

PUBHLTH381 Public Health Systems: Achievements and Challenges

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Creary, Melissa
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH 200 and Jr. or Sr. Standing OR declared PUBHLTH major
  • Description: This course will provide an overview of the essential role of the public health system, which includes health care systems, government organizations and non-governmental organizations, in improving health locally and globally. The top achievements in public health will be critically examined along with current and emerging challenges and threats to human health and well-being, including health inequities. Mechanisms and measures for evaluating human health and illness will be discussed. This course will emphasize multidisciplinary and multi-sector approaches to health promotion and disease prevention.

PUBHLTH382 Population Health Determinants & Disparities

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mehdipanah, Roshanak
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH200
  • Description: This course explores the social and environmental factors that impact disease susceptibility across populations. Students will learn of the complexities and interactions of factors that influence patterns of disease and health at multiple levels. The course will introduce key analytic frameworks and metrics for evaluating public health problems.
  • Course Goals: The goal of this course is to provide students with the foundations on determinants of health and how they contribute to health inequities among different population groups.
  • Competencies: 1. Define population health within the context of public health 2. Describe the importance of context in understanding population health 3. Explain the nature of health and disease at individual and societal levels 4. Identify how health is defined culturally and describe how cultural factors influence health 5. Identify key risk factors at multiple behavioral and genetic levels 6. Distinguish health disparities in relation to race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, geographic location, and other socio-economic dimensions 7. Critically apply key concepts and analytic frameworks to address population health issues 8. Describe the role of data in assessing, describing and evaluating the complex interactions among multiple determinants of health and disease
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Define population health within the context of public health 2. Describe the importance of context in understanding population health 3. Explain the nature of health and disease at individual and societal levels 4. Identify how health is defined culturally and describe how cultural factors influence health 5. Identify key risk factors at multiple behavioral and genetic levels 6. Distinguish health disparities in relation to race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, geographic location, and other socio-economic dimensions 7. Critically apply key concepts and analytic frameworks to address population health issues 8. Describe the role of data in assessing, describing and evaluating the complex interactions among multiple determinants of health and disease

PUBHLTH383 Data Driven Solutions in Public Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Kidwell, Kelley; Staff;
  • Prerequisites: STAT250; PUBHLTH 200
  • Description: This course introduces the importance of data in public health, including collection, analysis, interpretations, and dissemination. It provides examples of data used to evaluate public health decisions, policy and resource allocation. It is an introduction to biostatistical and epidemiological methods, informatics, and big data including usage, management and challenges.
  • Course Goals: To introduce students to the importance of data in public health, including its collection, analysis, interpretations and dissemination. To provide examples of how data are used to evaluate and assess public health decisions, policy and resource allocation. To introduce students to critical thinking of public health studies and media reports.
  • Competencies: By the end of this course students should be able to: 1)Identify key strategies and methods for obtaining current public health data 2)Explain the use of basic epidemiological methods in study design and implementation to generate new data and metrics to address public health issues 3)Illustrate how analyses and results are used to inform intervention development and influence appropriate public health policies. 4)Apply statistical methods in order to describe data, make inferences and test hypotheses regarding population parameters 5)Apply results from data analyses to explore, define, identify and prioritize public health challenges and solutions
  • Learning Objectives: 1)Identify key strategies and methods for obtaining current public health data 2)Explain the use of basic epidemiological methods in study design and implementation to generate new data and metrics to address public health issues 3)Illustrate how analyses and results are used to inform intervention development and influence appropriate public health policies. 4)Apply statistical methods in order to describe data, make inferences and test hypotheses regarding population parameters 5)Apply results from data analyses to explore, define, identify and prioritize public health challenges and solutions
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH383

PUBHLTH401 Exploring the public health spectrum of cancer: from prevention to survivorship

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mondul, Alison
  • Description: The course will review the socio-demographic magnitude of cancer in the US and globally, basic concepts of cancer biology and the causes of cancer. Major risk factors such as tobacco and obesity will be discussed. Students will be introduced to the concepts of prevention, screening, treatment, and survivorship.
  • Course Goals: Be familiar with the socio-demographic magnitude of cancer in the US and globally, basic concepts of cancer biology and the causes of cancer. Be able to identify major risk factors for cancer such as tobacco and obesity. Be familiar with the concepts of prevention, screening, treatment, and survivorship. Understand the application of epidemiologic methods to the study of cancer. Understand the role of the environment and social determinants of health in cancer.
  • Competencies: 1. Describe the socio-demographic magnitude of cancer in the US including racial/ethnic disparities. 2. Describe the socio-demographic magnitude of cancer globally; be able to compare and contrast cancer in developed vs. developing countries. 3. Describe the basic concepts of cancer biology. 4. Describe the causes of cancer. 5. Identify major risk factors for cancer such as tobacco and obesity. 6. Describe the role of the environment and social determinants in cancer. 7. Describe primary, secondary, and tertiary cancer prevention efforts. 8. Explain the role of screening in cancer prevention. 9. Describe the basic concepts of the current state of cancer treatment. 10. Describe how epidemiologic methods are applied in the study of cancer. 11. Describe the current state of epidemiologic research for several major cancer sites. 12. Discuss the psychosocial issues surrounding cancer survivorship.

PUBHLTH402 Changing Health Behaviors: What Works

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff; Piette, John;
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH 200
  • Description: This course gives undergraduate students an introduction to how brief interventions are used to impact health behaviors and the approaches used to help people make and attain behavior-change goals. Students also gain skills in applying scientific evidence from randomized trials and systematic reviews in public health decision-making.
  • Course Goals: 1) Know what brief behavioral interventions are and how they are delivered to address behavioral challenges 2) Know where to look for evidence supporting the effectiveness of brief interventions 3) Be able to review, interpret, and apply evidence from randomized trials, systematic reviews, and guidelines 4) Understand what types of brief interventions have the strongest evidence and for whom they work
  • Competencies: a) Identify theories, concepts and models from a range of social and behavior science disciplines that are used in public health research and practice involving multiple levels of change (e.g., individual, family, organization, community, and society). b) Describe overlap between current models and frameworks, and their limitations c) Describe how theory is useful in understanding why individuals do or do not engage in health behaviors. d) Understand the merits of using theory to inform interventions and their evaluation in public health. e) Describe some of the benefits and challenges of using social and behavioral theories and models to inform programs and policies involving multiple levels of change (e.g. individual, family, organization, community). f)Describe key adaptations and challenges in applying theories and frameworks to conduct public health research and practice across cultures and in resource poor settings.
  • Learning Objectives: 1) Know what brief behavioral interventions are and how they are delivered to address behavioral challenges 2) Know where to look for evidence supporting the effectiveness of brief interventions 3) Be able to review, interpret, and apply evidence from randomized trials, systematic reviews, and guidelines 4) Understand what types of brief interventions have the strongest evidence and for whom they work
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH402

PUBHLTH403 Obesity: From Cells to Society

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Bridges, Dave; Bauer, Kate;
  • Description: This course provides a comprehensive introduction to obesity, a highly prevalent chronic disease in the US and worldwide. Through collaboratory instruction, we will approach the topic of obesity from biological, behavioral, and social science perspectives, providing students from diverse backgrounds fundamental knowledge and insight into current scientific questions and debates.
  • Course Goals: The goal of this course is to provide a broad overview of obesity to undergraduate students. We will draw upon public health knowledge gained in PUBH200 by applying topics including assessment, surveillance, epidemiology, pathophysiology, prevention and treatment strategies, and public health policy to the topic of obesity.
  • Competencies: Through completion of this course, students will obtain the following competencies: 1. Understand definitions and assessment of obesity, 2. Describe recent trends and disparities in obesity prevalence in the US and globally, 3. Identify biological, behavioral, and social determinants of obesity, 4. Describe the health and economic consequences of obesity, and 5. Critically evaluate approaches to the prevention and treatment of obesity.

PUBHLTH405 Social history of infectious disease

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Zelner, Jonathan
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: We will focus on five specific pathogens that have had an outsize impact on the trajectory of human health and societies: Cholera, Polio, Tuberculosis, Influenza, and HIV.
  • Course Goals: This course is meant to help students develop a broad perspective on infectious diseases. By the end of the term, students should be familiar with a broad array of infectious diseases and the differences in mechanisms of transmission between them. Students will also become familiar with the ways in which the biological underpinnings of disease - at both the host and pathogen level - intersect with the social and environmental conditions that often facilitate transmission. Students will also learn about key historical events in the history of infectious disease epidemiology, including the 1866 London Cholera Epidemic, the 1918 influenza pandemic, the discovery of the Polio vaccine (as well as the role of UM SPH in evaluating the efficacy of the vaccine), and the emergence of the HIV/AIDS pandemic.
  • Competencies: Not applicable.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Understand the concept of infectious disease "natural history" of infection. 2. Understand and enumerate key infectious diseases in human history. 3. Understand the key social and historical mechanisms underlying the emergence and transmission of infectious diseases.

PUBHLTH406 Research Methods in Public Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Gamarel, Kristi
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course provides students with fundamental principles of research methodologies relevant to public health research. We will review a range of methodologies, including randomized controlled trials, observational studies, and mixed-method approaches. We will develop enhanced capacity to understand and critically appraise data from scientific studies.
  • Course Goals: This introductory course is designed for students interested in methodologies to (i) address social determinants of health and (ii) design or critique to address public health problems. This introductory course provides students with fundamental principles of research methodologies relevant to public health research. We will review a range of methodologies, including randomized controlled trials, non-randomized evaluations, observational studies, and mixed-method approaches to research. We will develop enhanced capacity to understand and critically appraise data from scientific studies, in order to be critical consumers of research and engaged participants in scientific discourse. Throughout the course, we will also emphasis ethical and cultural issues that underpin public health research. The overarching aim of the assigned readings, exams, assignments, and discussions is to empower you to think rigorously, systematically, and judiciously regarding how to appraise or conduct public health.
  • Competencies: Evidence-based Approaches to Public Health 1. Select quantitative and qualitative data collection methods appropriate for a given public health context 2. Interpret results of data analysis for public health research, policy or practice Planning & Management to Promote Health 3. Assess population needs, assets and capacities that affect communities' health 4. Apply awareness of cultural values and practices to the design or implementation of public health policies or programs 5. Select methods to evaluate public health programs Communication 6. Communicate audience-appropriate public health content, both in writing and through oral presentation 7. Describe the importance of cultural competence in communicating public health content Interprofessional Practice 8. Perform effectively on interprofessional teams
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Acquire a knowledge base of research methodologies used in public health research 2. Become a critical consumer of public health research and interventions 3. Explain the role of quantitative and qualitative methods and sciences in describing and assessing a population's health 4. Explain the critical importance of evidence in advancing public health knowledge 5. Apply methodological principles toward planning public health research

PUBHLTH407 Links between Infectious and Non-Communicable Diseases

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Yang, Zhenhua
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH370 (or equivalent)
  • Description: This course introduces the students to the etiology, pathogenesis, and the evolution of epidemiology of major infectious and non-communicable diseases. It discusses the links between major infectious and non-communicable diseases, including epidemiological evidence, the underlying mechanisms, and their public health implications.
  • Course Goals: The goals of this course are: 1) to introduce the students to the epidemiological transition of major human diseases, 2) to develop an appreciation for the convergence of infectious and non-communicable diseases in low and middle income countries and for the links between infectious and non-infectious diseases, and 3) to understand the public health challenges and implications of the infectious and non-communicable disease connections.
  • Competencies: The course concurrently addresses, partially or substantially, several Bachelor of Science (BS) in Public Health Sciences program requirements, including: • Gain an understanding of the natural history of infectious and chronic diseases, their environmental and biological origins, their distributions among populations, and strategies for their prevention and management. • Examine and explore multiple aspects of infectious and chronic diseases, including socio-economic, behavioral, biological, environmental, and structural factors that contribute to their origin and distribution among populations. • Understand the basic biology, transmission, and natural history of important human infectious and chronic diseases. • Examine methodologies that are used in public health to study the underlying causes and impact of various aspects of infectious and chronic diseases, including surveillance, epidemiological investigations, and mathematical modeling. • Explore multi-tiered public health strategies for the prevention, treatment, and potential eradication of infectious and chronic diseases.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Gain an understanding of the international statistical classification of diseases and related health problems. 2. Describe the etiology, history, pathogenesis, and evolution of major infectious and non-infectious diseases in different populations. 3. Review epidemiological evidence for links between major infectious and non-communicable diseases 4. Identify methodologies required for studying links between infectious and non-communicable diseases and for exploring the underlying mechanisms of such links. 5. Discuss the public health implications of epidemiological transitions of human diseases and the infectious and non-communicable disease links.

PUBHLTH413 Vaccines in Public Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Yang, Zhenhua
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH370 or EPID512
  • Description: This course introduces essential vaccinology, covering pre-clinical vaccine development, clinical trials, new vaccine licensing, immunization program design and evaluation. It also introduces population transmission dynamics concepts, and the impact of pathogen and human population diversity on vaccination. Recent advancements in major types of non-infectious vaccines will also be discussed.
  • Course Goals:
    1. To introduces the students to the history and evolution of vaccinology, and the principles and methods of epidemiology, statistics, microbiology, immunology, and genetics used in vaccine development and immunization program design.
    2. To introduce the students to the general procedures for new vaccine development and licensure, including the different phases of clinical trials of new vaccines.
    3. To introduces the students to the concepts of population transmission dynamics, and the impact of pathogen and human population genetic diversity on vaccine development.
    4. To expose the students to the new frontiers of vaccines - development of vaccines for major types of non-infectious diseases.
  • Competencies:

    Although there is no official competencies that have been established for the new public health undergraduate program, this course addresses, partially or substantially, a number of BS in Public Health Sciences Requirements, which include:

    • Gain an understanding of the natural history of infectious and chronic diseases, their environmental and biological origins, their distributions among populations, and strategies for their prevention and management.
    • Examine and explore multiple aspects of infectious and chronic diseases, including socio-economic, behavioral, biological, environmental, and structural factors that contribute to their origin and distribution among populations.
    • Understand the basic biology, transmission, and natural history of important human infectious and chronic diseases.
    • Examine methodologies that are used in public health to study the underlying causes and impact of various aspects of infectious and chronic diseases, including surveillance, epidemiological investigations, and mathematical modeling.
    • Explore multi-tiered public health strategies for the prevention, treatment, and potential eradication of infectious and chronic diseases.
  • Learning Objectives:
    1. To gain an understanding of how new knowledge generated from epidemiological studies from different populations, basic biomedical science research, and health policy assessment, along with the development of new technology, can jointly inform and impact the development of new vaccines for the prevention of different types of diseases, including both infectious and non-infectious diseases.
    2. to be familiar with the essential steps involved in developing a new vaccine.
    3. to understand important factors that affect the efficacy, effectiveness, and the public acceptance of vaccination.
  • This course is cross-listed with EPID 513 in the Epidemiology Department department.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH413

PUBHLTH460 Introduction to Bacterial Pathogenesis

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Marrs, Carl F
  • Prerequisites: Pubhlth 370 or Bio 207, AND Pubhlth 311 or Bio 305
  • Description: Microbial structures and their relation to basic mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis; structure, function, and genetics of bacterial toxins; and host resistance and immunity. Discussions of pathogenic organisms of major public health importance, diseases caused, and their epidemiology.
  • Course Goals: The goals of this course are to have the students gain a basic understanding of the kinds of virulence factors used by pathogenic bacteria to cause disease, how we discover and study those traits, and how we can make use of this knowledge for treatment and prevention of bacterial diseases.
  • Competencies: 1. Understand the role played by bacteria in human health and disease. 2. Understand how genetic transfer mechanisms can lead to bacteria with increased virulence and antibiotic resistance. 3. Understand how bacterial toxins and other virulence factors help bacteria cause disease. 4. Understand public health approaches to preventing bacterial diseases. 5. Understand how antibiotics kill bacteria and how bacteria become resistant to them.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Understand the role played by bacteria in human health and disease. 2. Understand how genetic transfer mechanisms can lead to bacteria with increased virulence and antibiotic resistance. 3. Understand how bacterial toxins and other virulence factors help bacteria cause disease. 4. Understand public health approaches to preventing bacterial diseases. 5. Understand how antibiotics kill bacteria and how bacteria become resistant to them.
  • This course is cross-listed with Epid 460 in the Epidemiology, SPH department.

PUBHLTH465 The Science of Medicine

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s):
  • Description: The class studies evidence-based medicine. It begins with a thorough review of study design, and then uses these skills to explore relevant issues to Public Health and medical practice. The first half of each class is interactive lecture; the second half is a flipped classroom with activity-based learning.
  • Course Goals: The goals of the class are: 1. Introduce students to the practice of Public Health and Medicine 2. Educate about study designs for Public Health and Medicine 3. Apply study design competencies to readings in Public Health and Medicine 4. Explore issues such as shared decision making, ethics, medical communication, and health disparities.
  • Competencies: At the conclusion of the class students will feel competent to navigate the health care system as a provider, consumer and informed citizen. They will be well positioned to seek future education in Public Health practice.
  • Learning Objectives: Students taking this course are expected to learn about: 1. Evidence-based medicine 2. The scientific underpinnings of diagnosis and treatment 3. The ethics of medical decision making; strategies for communication and special populations
  • This course is cross-listed with MEDPREP 470. Additionally Kinesiology and Biology are considering cross-listing. in the Medical school department.

PUBHLTH477 Readings in Public Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Youatt, Emily; Staff;
  • Description: Review of literature or directed readings on selected topic related to one or more areas of public health.
  • Course Goals: The goals of this course are to: 1. Introduce students to peer-reviewed literature in public health 2. Improve students' ability to locate, use, evaluate, and synthesize public health information
  • Competencies: None (see objectives and program learning domains)
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of the term, students should be able to find and appropriately interpret and critically evaluate the findings in peer-reviewed scientific literature.

PUBHLTH478 Practical Projects in Public Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff; Youatt, Emily;
  • Description: Practical projects allows undergraduate students to explore community-based public health settings. Project must be related to public health practice and developed in consultation with a faculty advisor. Students will write an integrative paper analyzing the organization's role in the public health system and critically reflecting on their experience.
  • Course Goals: To provide students an opportunity to engage with local-level public health professionals and organizations that engage in public health practice.
  • Competencies: None/see learning objectives and program domains
  • Learning Objectives: As part of this course students will consider the following concepts: 1. Health promotion at a population level 2. Community dynamics and the cultural context in which public health professionals work 3. Organizational structure and dynamics, including the organization's role in the public health system 4. How to operate professionally in a public health organization (including but not limited to: personal work ethic, professionalism, teamwork, and leadership)

PUBHLTH479 Independent Research in Public Health

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Youatt, Emily
  • Description: Students conduct independent research on a specific public health topic under the supervision of a public health faculty member.
  • Course Goals: The goals of this course are to: 1. Introduce undergraduate students to public health research; 2. Provide students an opportunity to gain experience conducting public health research; 3. Improve students' ability to communicate public health information in written form; 4. Improve students' ability to locate, use, evaluate, and synthesize public health information.
  • Competencies: Please see above course goals
  • Learning Objectives: After completing this course, students will: 1. Understand how to form a research question; 2. Be able to identify relevant literature or data sources to address a research question; 3. Better understand the role of data in understanding public health problems.

PUBHLTH481 Public Health Practice and Professionalism

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Youatt, Emily; Staff;
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH 200
  • Description: Students will apply their knowledge and skills to address current public health challenges. Professional development and engagement with public health agencies will prepare students to work in the field.
  • Course Goals: PUBHLTH 481 is an introduction to public health practice that will foster creative and systematic thinking through experiential learning that prepares students to work collaboratively with government agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and community partners, addressing current public health challenges.
  • Competencies: Not applicable
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of the course students should (be able to): 1. Explain what public health practice is and distinguish it from public health research; 2. Integrate knowledge with theory and practice to propose solutions to current public health challenges (esp. those that impact population health and contribute to health disparities); 3. Describe public health infrastructure, including the systems, competencies, frameworks, relationships, and resources that enable public health agencies to perform their core functions and essential services; 4. Assess community health needs, identifying key problems and assets, and create a conceptual framework that informs decision making; 5. Prioritize working with communities, agencies and other stakeholders in culturally appropriate ways; 6. Engage in cross-disciplinary, team-based discussion and project design; 7. Collect high quality data to analyze, evaluate and disseminate as public health information via appropriate channels; 8. Develop a strategy to promote health—from broad policy to direct intervention—that accounts for available resources, stakeholder interests, and community needs; 9. Describe a process for evaluation that assesses and improves the quality of a public health strategy and determines its effectiveness; 10. Exhibit professionalism and an ability to think critically while communicating and practicing public health; 11. Recognize the importance of public health work that is performed outside of an academic setting, and how learning in this context contributes to professional advancement in the field.

PUBHLTH503 Service Learning for Health Professionals

  • Undergraduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mason, Nancy
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Description: An interdisciplinary service-based course required for all pharmacy students and elective for students of other health science disciplines. Learning experiences will focus on social justice and professional responsibilities for civic engagement. Through class participation, reflection, and guided discussions, students will explore issues of health disparities, poverty, and the medically under-served. Students participate in community service in addition to regular classroom discussion sessions.
  • This course is cross-listed with .