Environmental Health Sciences Courses

EHS504: Genes and the Environment

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Rozek, Laura (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None.
  • Description: In past years disease causation frequently was thought of as a "dichotomy" between genes ("nature") and the environment ("nurture"). More recently this view has been replaced with a more holistic perspective that emphasizes the importance of interactions between genes and environmental and/or occupational exposures. The focus of this course will be on interaction between genes and specific environmental and/or occupational exposures. The course will consist of detailed evaluation of specific examples of gene-exposure interaction (e.g., beryllium-related lung disease, peripheral neurotoxicity from organophosphate pesticides, bladder cancer and amine exposure) the underlying science of such examples, medical consequences, potential policy and social implications of current and future scientific knowledge, and review of current and pending legislation that address these issues. The course will meet for one two-hour session per week, and will be conducted in an advanced seminar-style format. Student will be expected to make presentations and lead discussion, in addition to presentations by faculty and outside guests. Student evaluations will be based on written reports, class participation and class presentation.

EHS510: Responsible Conduct in Research and Scholarship

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Batterman, Stuart (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Responsible Conduct in Research and Scholarship --- This course provides training in 8 modules: (1) Research and Academic Misconduct; (2) Intellectual Property; (3) Responsible Authorship and Publications; (4) Human Subject Research and IRBs; (5) Animal Use and Care; (6) Mentor/Mentee Relationships; (7) Conflict of interest; and (8) Research and Scholarship in Society and the Global Marketplace.
  • Learning Objectives: Responsible Conduct in Research and Scholarship --- This course provides training in 8 modules: (1) Research and Academic Misconduct; (2) Intellectual Property; (3) Responsible Authorship and Publications; (4) Human Subject Research and IRBs; (5) Animal Use and Care; (6) Mentor/Mentee Relationships; (7) Conflict of interest; and (8) Research and Scholarship in Society and the Global Marketplace.

EHS556: Occupational Ergonomics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Joseph, Brad (Residential);
  • Offered Every other year (next semester: Fall 2022)
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Principles, concepts and procedures concerned with worker performance, health and safety. Topics include: biomechanics, job safety, anthropometry, work physiology, psychophysics, work stations, tools, work procedures, work standards, Musculoskeletal disorders, noise, vibration, heat stress and the analysis and design of work.
Concentration Competencies that EHS556 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Industrial Hygiene MPH Explain the physiological, toxicological, and/or biomechanical interactions of physical, chemical, biological, mechanical, and ergonomic agents, factors, and/or stressors found in the workplace with the human body EHS602, EHS556
EHS Industrial Hygiene MS Explain the physiological, toxicological, and/or biomechanical interactions of physical, chemical, biological, mechanical, and ergonomic agents, factors, and/or stressors found in the workplace with the human body EHS603, EHS556, EHS602

EHS570: Water Quality Management

  • Graduate level
  • Residential and Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Fall term(s) for residential students; Winter term(s) for online MPH students; Winter term(s) for online MS students.
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Xi, Chuanwu (Residential); Xi, Chuanwu (Online MPH); Xi, Chuanwu (Online MS);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Principles of science and engineering used in the evaluation and control of water quality. Includes current legislation, types of pollution, sources and nature of pollution, introduction to water quality management practices, water supply and treatment, hydrologic concepts, effects of waste discharge on receiving waters, lake management, and water quality criteria and standards.
  • Learning Objectives: not a new course
Concentration Competencies that EHS570 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Environmental Quality, Sustainability, and Health MPH Evaluate environmental quality and health, including environmental standards on air and water quality, and their effects on individual, community and global health EHS582, EHS570

EHS572: Environmental Impact Assessment (NRE 514)

  • Graduate level
  • Both Residential and OJOC
  • Fall term(s) for OJOC and residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for OJOC and residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Batterman, Stuart
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: EHS 574, Grad Status
  • Description: A comprehensive framework for predicting and evaluating environmental impacts is presented. The course emphasizes the theory, application, integration and evaluation of models simulating transport and fate of contaminants in air, surface and ground water, and soil. Case studies and computer exercises demonstrate contemporary exposure and health risk assessment problems.
  • This course is cross-listed with NRE514 in the NRE department.

EHS576: Biological Agents

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Xi, Chuanwu (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Biology, Chem, Grad Standing or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Biological agents in the environment that have a substantial impact on human health.

EHS582: Principles of Community Air Pollution

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Dvonch, Tim (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Discussion of economic, nuisance, and health aspects, emphasizing sources, causes, effects, control measures, and the organization and administration of community control programs.
Concentration Competencies that EHS582 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Environmental Quality, Sustainability, and Health MPH Evaluate environmental quality and health, including environmental standards on air and water quality, and their effects on individual, community and global health EHS582, EHS570

EHS591: Environmental Toxicology In Communities

  • Graduate level
  • Both Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Summer term(s) for online MPH students; Summer term(s) for online MS students.
  • 3 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 3 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Charles, Simone Charles, Simone (Online MPH); Charles, Simone (Online MS);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: Successful completion of PUBHLTH 514 is preferred
  • Description: Toxicology deals with the health effects that can result from environmental hazard exposures. In some communities, these exposures are compounded by historical inequities. Understanding the mechanisms by which these individual and cumulative exposures influence health outcomes is important to inform policy that promotes health and reduces health disparities.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Articulate basic concepts and terminology pertinent to environmental toxicology and the body’s response to toxicant exposures 2. Describe the various sources of toxicants to humans with an emphasis of sources in historically marginalized communities 3. Determine the influence of environmental factors, including environmental racism, on toxicological outcomes 4. Discuss cumulative risks and modifying factors that influence the toxicological response of the body, considering historical compounded environmental exposures 5. Discuss the regulatory framework and policies needed to address historical environmental racism-associated exposures to toxicants in communities

EHS592: Infectious Disease And Emergency Response In Communities

  • Graduate level
  • Residential and Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a first year course for Online students
  • Fall term(s) for residential students; Fall term(s) for online MPH students; Fall term(s) for online MS students.
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students; 3 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 3 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Le, Aurora (Residential); Le, Aurora Le, Aurora (Online MPH); Le, Aurora (Online MS);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course will provide students an understanding of infectious disease outbreaks and control, the current infrastructure in the US to address infectious diseases and deploy emergency response, the role public health practitioners have in emergency response, and how gaps in infectious disease and emergency response in communities can be addressed.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of the course, students should be able to: 1. Describe the source of infectious diseases. 2. Characterize modes of disease transmission. 3. Identify key factors impacting the emergence of infectious disease outbreaks, including the role played by the environment. 4. Describe the role of emergency response in infectious disease mitigation and management, as well as public health infrastructure. 5. Understand the United States' infrastructure to respond to infectious disease outbreaks and pandemics. 6. Describe the United States' capabilities and capacity to address infectious disease outbreaks and deploy emergency response. 7. Compare the United States' capabilities and capacity to address infectious disease outbreaks relative to other developed nations. 8. Explain the impact of environmental and social injustices, including racism, on the emergence and outcomes of infectious disease outbreaks and emergency response. 9. Explain how structural racism has undermined environmental health at community, organizational, and societal levels. 10. Report on how structural racism has undermined occupational health at community, organizational, and societal levels. 11. Examine strategies that can be applied to enhance emergency response to infectious disease outbreaks, including strategies that promote environmental justice in communities. 12. Determine the role of public health practitioners to address and dismantle structural racism in infectious disease emergency response.

EHS594: Global Environment and Health

  • Graduate level
  • Both Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a first year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for online MPH students; Winter term(s) for online MS students.
  • 2 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Batterman, Stuart (Online MPH); Batterman, Stuart (Online MS);
  • Last offered Winter 2021
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH 514
  • Description: Minimize environmental risks, and promote health and sustainability. This course introduces the sources, transport and fate processes, and risks associated with pollutants in air, water and soil, describes sampling and assessment techniques, and presents mechanisms for management, including legal and regulatory approaches, markets and partnerships, and technological innovations.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Describe characteristics of pollutants and pollutant sources in all environmental media, including ambient air, indoor air, surface water, groundwater and soil, that are essential to understanding the potential for pollutant exposure and toxicity. 2. Obtain and analyze relevant data pertinent to environmental pollutant transport and fate, cross-media transfer, bioaccumulation, multimedia exposure pathways, and human exposure. 3. Describe and utilize concepts, terminology and models for mass balance approaches used in environmental modeling and assessments. 4. Specify monitoring needs, sampling approaches, and data quality objectives needed to characterize contaminants in air, water and soil 5. Obtain, describe and use standards and guidelines that pertain to exposure and risk-based limits for pollutants in air, water and soil. 6. Describe the rationale and assess the feasibility, applicability and performance of alternative management approaches to controlling environmental pollutants and promoting environmental health. 7. Utilize and interpret results of selected models that describe pollutant sources, transport and fate processes, and human exposure and risk, including the use of spreadsheet tools for modeling and data management.

EHS596: Climate, Justice, Health & Sustainability

  • Graduate level
  • Both Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for online MPH students; Winter term(s) for online MS students.
  • 2 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Charles, Simone O'Neill, Marie (Online MPH); Charles, Simone O'Neill, Marie (Online MS);
  • Last offered Winter 2021
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH 514
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Effective climate action that simultaneously acts to reduce inequalities must focus on climate justice if climate action is to result in resilient communities. We will focus on the science of climate change and health impacts through the lens of climate justice and environmental justice (EJ) for disproportionately impacted communities.
  • Learning Objectives: Learning objectives for this course are: a. Explain key features of the phenomenon of climate change (and the associated climate justice) including major drivers, time course, uncertainties, impact and distribution of associated risks b. Describe the major health-relevant exposures, specific to disparate communities, that are sensitive to climate change c. Describe the major anticipated health effects associated with exposures to disparate communities affected by climate change d. Discuss the health impacts of climate change specific to vulnerable populations e. Explain important tools used for assessing vulnerability of disparate communities to climate change impacts f. Discuss prevention, adaptation, and mitigation actions, with considerations of climate justice, to prevent and control anticipated exposures due to climate change g. Evaluate policy options for climate change resilience, mitigation and adaptation at the global, national, institutional and individual scales h. Discuss public health responses to anticipated climate change-related health outcomes in disparate communities

EHS597: Environmental Health and Policy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential and Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a first year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for residential students; Winter term(s) for online MPH students; Winter term(s) for online MS students.
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Dvonch, Tim (Residential); Dvonch, Tim (Online MPH); Dvonch, Tim (Online MS);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course will provide the knowledge and skills necessary to assess policies and their impact on environmental health and sustainability issues, and understand the role that governmental and organizational bodies play in the development, implementation, and oversight of these policies.
  • Learning Objectives: The students taking this class are expected to be able to: C1) Analyze environmental health policies, considering stakeholder engagement and the role of state, federal, and international agencies; C2) Understand the role of bodies and agencies in environmental health policies at local, state, federal, and international levels; C3) Evaluate policies for their impact on public health and health equity; 4) Recognize the challenges to successful development and implementation of environmental health policies.

EHS601: Exposure Science and Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Dvonch, Tim (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course will convey the basic concepts of occupational and environmental exposure science: the fundamental and practical aspects of assessing and controlling exposures to hazardous agents, broadly defined, encountered in occupational, residential, and ambient environments. The course is designed to provide the knowledge and skills necessary to assess exposure, and understand how upstream processes create risks for health. Major topics include: the regulatory landscape; prevention and sustainability (by design); recognition and evaluation of the various pathways and routes of exposure to chemical, physical, and biological hazards; air, water, soil, surface, food, and consumer product contamination; control hierarchies, strategies, and technologies, criteria, and standards; the international dimension; and ethical issues.
Concentration Competencies that EHS601 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Environmental Health Promotion and Policy MPH Summarize qualitative and quantitative aspects of exposure assessment EHS601
EHS Environmental Quality, Sustainability, and Health MPH Evaluate human exposure using exposure assessment strategies and considering multiple sources, media, pathways, and cycles EHS601

EHS602: Essentials of Toxicology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Colacino, Justin (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course examines basic concepts of occupational and environmental toxicology, including uptake, distribution, metabolic conversion, and elimination of toxic agents, as well as the fundamental models used to describe the interaction of xenobiotic agents with biological systems. The course focuses on the application of these concepts to the assessment of exposures, estimates for risk of disease, establishment of appropriate limits on exposures and ambient levels of toxic materials/agents, and understanding and prevention of mortality and morbidity resulting from environmental exposure to toxic substances through a case study format.
Concentration Competencies that EHS602 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Environmental Health Promotion and Policy MPH Apply risk assessment approaches to environmental and occupational hazards EHS602
EHS Environmental Health Sciences MPH Evaluate toxicological effects associated with exposures and stressors, considering chemical properties and biological mechanisms EHS602
EHS Industrial Hygiene MPH Explain the physiological, toxicological, and/or biomechanical interactions of physical, chemical, biological, mechanical, and ergonomic agents, factors, and/or stressors found in the workplace with the human body EHS602, EHS556
EHS Toxicology MPH Explain basic principles of toxicology and their application to public health EHS602
EHS Toxicology MPH Apply toxicology to risk assessment of environmental and occupational hazards EHS602
EHS Industrial Hygiene MS Explain the physiological, toxicological, and/or biomechanical interactions of physical, chemical, biological, mechanical, and ergonomic agents, factors, and/or stressors found in the workplace with the human body EHS603, EHS556, EHS602
EHS Toxicology MS Explain basic principles of toxicology and their application to public health EHS602
EHS Toxicology MS Apply toxicological knowledge and skills to the risk assessment of chemicals EHS602
EHS Toxicology PhD Apply basic principles of toxicology to public health EHS602
EHS Toxicology PhD Apply toxicology to risk assessment of chemicals, including hazard identification, exposure assessment, dose-response assessment, risk characterization and risk management EHS602
EPID Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology MPH Explain the relevant biological and behavioral mechanisms that influence human exposures to and health effects of environmental and occupational stressors EHS602

EHS603: Occupational and Environmental Disease

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Robins, Thomas (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course will focus on selected topics in occupational and environmental disease, including an understanding of causation and assessing the scientific literature. The goal will be to cover major toxins/exposures and also key organ systems and/or disease categories, reviewing conditions of historical significance as well as current relevance, all within the concepts and contexts of occupational and environmental epidemiology. Major health effects and disease categories to be covered include: lung diseases related to asbestos and other pneumoconiotic dusts; immunologic lung diseases such as asthma and hypersensitivity pneumonitis; illness caused by organic solvents and persistent organics; pesticide related diseases; occupational skin disease; occupational hearing loss; occupational infectious diseases; illness caused by metals such as lead, mercury, arsenic, and cadmium; environmental and occupational carcinogens; health effects of ionizing radiation including radon; health issues related to outdoor air pollution and indoor air quality including building related illness and mold; health effects of shift work and the built environment; issues of reproductive health; disparities in occupational and environmental health; and other selected topics.
Concentration Competencies that EHS603 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Environmental Health Promotion and Policy MPH Recognize adverse health consequences of common environmental and occupational exposures EHS603
EHS Environmental Health Sciences MPH Recognize adverse health consequences of common environmental and occupational exposures to chemical, physical, and biological hazards EHS603
EHS Environmental Health Sciences MS Recognize adverse health consequences of common environmental and occupational exposures to chemical, physical, and biological hazards EHS603
EHS Industrial Hygiene MS Explain the physiological, toxicological, and/or biomechanical interactions of physical, chemical, biological, mechanical, and ergonomic agents, factors, and/or stressors found in the workplace with the human body EHS603, EHS556, EHS602

EHS604: Integrated Approaches in Environmental Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Charles, Simone (Residential);
  • Last offered Fall 2020
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Advisory Prerequisites: Completion of approved internship, research or practical experience
  • Description: This project-oriented course provides the student the opportunity to integrate academic principles, practical skills and concepts in environmental health related to a real-world environmental health problem. This course provides an integrated experience in EHS approaches, combining expertise and knowledge in environmental quality, industrial hygiene, exposure, toxicology into an integrated project.
  • Learning Objectives: a. To provide useful insights and solutions to a real problem in Environmental Health Sciences (EHS): Explore the ability to use data and models to provide scientific insights to this problem b. To integrate scientific information and public health skills through interacting with students from other EHS specializations on a common project c. To learn to select and apply tools/methods/models and empirical approaches to understand and assess exposure d. Communicate environmental health sciences content and findings in multiple forms appropriate to various audiences e. Appreciate the nexus of MPH Program components to personal educational and professional goals.
Concentration Competencies that EHS604 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Environmental Health Sciences MPH Communicate environmental and occupational health findings in writing at a level consistent with peer-reviewed journals, including descriptions of design, results, and interpretation EHS604

EHS608: Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): O'Neill, Marie (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Introduces topics in environmental and occupational epidemiology, methods to evaluate health effects of exposures in environment and workplace, and policy and public health applications. Lectures cover key environmental and occupational epidemiology research; student-led discussions critique current literature. Students learn about scope, limitations, applications and future of environmental and occupational epidemiology.
  • This course is cross-listed with This course is already cross-listed with EPID 608. in the Epidemiology department.
Concentration Competencies that EHS608 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EPID Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology MPH Design an epidemiologic study of an environmental or occupational factor and a health outcome that tests one or more specific hypotheses EPID608, EHS608

EHS614: Water and Global Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Xi, Chuanwu (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2021
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Poor water quality, insufficient quantity and inadequate access to water are among the most serious threats to human health worldwide. This course analyzes the historical and contemporary roles that water plays on global health. Key drivers that affect water quality and quantity (with linkages to human health impacts) are investigated, including agriculture, climate change, population growth and urbanization, natural resources, international trade, and regional conflicts. Both theoretical and practical methods are used to examine real world cases. A systems framework is used to develop sustainable and appropriate solutions that consider individual, social, technological, and institutional factors.
  • Learning Objectives: L1 - the historical role of water in shaping the growth and development of humans and societies L2 - similarities and differences of human health and disease issues across the world (e.g., developed versus developing nations, region X versus region Y) that are water-related L3 - how key drivers (e.g., population growth, agriculture, international trade, biodiversity, resource exploitation) exacerbate water supply, security, sanitation and waste L4 - the key biological, chemical, and physical stressors in water systems around the world L5 - systems approaches and how these may be used to tackle complex environmental health issues L6 -the roles of individuals, scientists, organizations (non-governmental, governmental), and nations in the management and sustainability of water resources L7 - sustainable solutions and evaluative schemes/metrics to 'water and global health' at the individual-, technological-, and institutional-levels

EHS616: Introduction to Toxicological Pathology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Bergin, Ingrid (Residential);
  • Offered Every other year (next semester: Fall 2022)
  • Prerequisites: Physiology and EHS 511 or equivalent.
  • Description: This course will provide and introduction to the histologic damage produced by chemical toxicants. A combination of lectures, student-led discussions and slide-reading sessions will be used to integrate concepts of toxicological mechanism, physiology and pathologic outcome. Emphasis will be place on molecular methods and mechanisms used for the diagnosis and investigative toxicological pathology. The pathology associated with chemicals that damage the major organ systems of humans and mammals will be discussed. During the two credit hours of didactic class presentations student will lead discussions on the pathologic effects of chemicals on cells, tissues and organs and the pathophysiologic outcome. This course is intended for advanced graduate students in the life sciences.
Concentration Competencies that EHS616 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Toxicology MPH Predict toxic responses of representatives from major classes of chemicals with respect to target organs, physiological processes, and molecular mechanisms of toxicity EHS616
EHS Toxicology MS Explain how molecular mechanisms, biological processes, and chemical reactivity influence possible toxicant targets at the molecular, cellular, organ, and physiological level EHS616

EHS651: Occupational Health, Safety and Environmental Program Management

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Offered Every other year (next semester: Winter 2023)
  • Last offered Winter 2021
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course introduces future leaders of plant and corporate level occupational health, safety and environmental programs to the breadth of functions and activities routinely performed by OHSE managers. Among the topics discussed are: OHSE organization structure and staffing, management systems, program content and metrics, budgeting, risk management, incident investigation and management, emergency preparedness and response, regulatory compliance, legal systems, health and safety culture, and prevention through design processes.
  • Learning Objectives: Students will gain a fundamental understanding of: (1) How OHSE programs are typically organized, the roles and responsibilities of OHSE managers, and expectations of other OHSE stakeholders in the organization. (2) Challenges associated with managing personnel and processes, including dealing with ethical issues, setting goals and measuring performance, hiring and training professionals, and managing consultants. (3) Financial aspects of program management, such as risk management and insurance, budgeting, workers compensation, and legal liability for both corporate activities and products. (4) Incident investigation and management, as well as emergency planning and response management. (5) Regulatory rulemaking, inspections, and compliance management processes.
Concentration Competencies that EHS651 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Industrial Hygiene MPH Describe the relevance of business and managerial practices to workplace health and safety EHS651

EHS652: Evaluation of Chemical Hazards

  • Graduate level
  • Both Residential and OJOC
  • Fall term(s) for OJOC and residential students;
  • 3-4 credit hour(s) for OJOC and residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Meeker, John
  • Last offered Fall 2020
  • Prerequisites: Previous or concurrent enrollment in biostatistics course
  • Description: Concepts and techniques related to the evaluation of occupational exposures to gases, vapors, and aerosols. Emphasis on operating mechanisms and practical aspects of industrial hygiene air-monitoring equipment, characterizing exposure distributions, and developing sampling strategies. Lectures, laboratory exercises, demonstrations, problems, technical reports, and reading. Primarily for students in occupational health and safety.
Concentration Competencies that EHS652 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Environmental Health Sciences MPH Summarize qualitative and quantitative aspects of exposure assessment based on hazard properties, applicable exposure pathways, and routes of exposure EHS652
EHS Industrial Hygiene MPH Identify and describe the qualitative and quantitative aspect of hazardous workplace agents, factors, and stressors associated with defined sources and/or processes EHS652
EHS Industrial Hygiene MPH Assess qualitative, quantitative, and statistical aspects of workplace hazards and exposures, and consequent health risks based on applicable pathways and modes of action EHS652
EHS Industrial Hygiene MPH Interpret and apply occupational and environmental regulations EHS652
EHS Environmental Health Sciences MS Describe sources and processes involved in the transport, behavior and fate of toxic chemicals in the environment and workplace EHS652
EHS Environmental Health Sciences MS Interpret EHS info within the context of public health EHS652
EHS Industrial Hygiene MS Identify and describe the qualitative and quantitative aspect of hazardous workplace agents, factors, and stressors associated with defined sources and/or processes EHS652
EHS Industrial Hygiene MS Assess qualitative, quantitative, and statistical aspects of workplace hazards and exposures, and consequent health risks based on applicable pathways and modes of action EHS652
EHS PhD Apply basic principles of environmental and occupational health in the context of public health EHS652
EHS PhD Describe how data are collected and used in exposure and risk assessments of environmental and occupational health hazards EHS652

EHS653: Environmental Sampling And Analysis Laboratory

  • Graduate level
  • Both Residential and OJOC
  • Winter term(s) for OJOC and residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for OJOC and residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Grubb, Greg Charles, Simone
  • Prerequisites: EHS 652 or permission of instructor
  • Description: This course explores environmental physical, chemical and biological contaminant exposure assessment for regulatory compliance and epidemiologic risk estimation for public health. It focuses on theory, equipment use, instrumentation, methodologies, and strategies used for measuring and analyzing environmental contaminants, including chemical, physical and biological agents. Emphasis is placed on air monitoring, dermal, surface, noise, soil, water, and wastewater contaminant sampling and data analysis.

EHS654: Control of Exposures to Airborne Contaminants

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Grubb, Greg (Residential);
  • Offered Every other year (next semester: Winter 2024)
  • Prerequisites: Grad status
  • Description: Discussion of the principles of controlling airborne contaminants in working and living environments. It deals with general environmental and local exhaust ventilation for indoor spaces, filtration and emission control for the ambient environment, and personal respiratory protection. Specific topics include: basic properties of air and aerodynamics, and behavior of airborne contaminants; general dilution and local exhaust ventilation concepts, methods and design; fan performance and selection; air cleaning equipment; ventilation testing, OSHA and EPA standards, indoor air quality, and others.
Concentration Competencies that EHS654 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Industrial Hygiene MPH Recommend and evaluate engineering, administrative, and personal protective controls and/or other interventions to reduce or eliminate workplace hazards EHS654

EHS655: Human Exposure Analysis

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Neitzel, Richard (Residential);
  • Offered Next offering Winter 2024
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: Graduate standing
  • Description: Students taking this course will learn how to conduct statistical analyses of human exposures, and will apply these skills to a dataset containing exposure and health outcome data. They will also develop skills for understanding, interpreting, and communicating exposure information and for identifying and communicating evidence-based risk management recommendations.

EHS657: Advanced Exposure Assessment

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Meeker, John (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2020
  • Prerequisites: EHS507, BIOSTAT503/equivalent, EPID503/equivalent
  • Description: The course will introduce classical, contemporary, and cutting-edge approaches to the estimation of human exposure to environmental and occupational agents as it relates to epidemiology studies as well as risk science, regulatory compliance, exposure source/route apportionment, and susceptibility factors. Qualitative and quantitative methods in exposure science will be covered, including surrogate measures, exposure modeling, and biological markers of exposure, in addition to statistical concepts such as exposure measurement error and efficient study design.

EHS658: Physical Hazards

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Neitzel, Richard (Residential);
  • Last offered Fall 2020
  • Prerequisites: Graduate Standing or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Lectures, discussions, demonstrations on the health effects, measurements methods, regulations, and control technologies related to physical hazards, including temperature extremes, noise, vibration, lasers, non-ionizing radiation (rf, microwave, IR, visible, and UV), and ionizing radiation.
Concentration Competencies that EHS658 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Environmental Health Sciences MPH Recommend approaches to prevent and control environmental exposures that are risks to human health and safety EHS658

EHS660: Environmental Epigenetics and Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Dolinoy, Dana (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2021
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course examines principles and applications of epigenetics as they relate to human nutrition, environmental exposures and disease etiology, including mechanisms and policy implications. Case studies evaluate processes using animal and human examples drawn from the literature. Students will be introduced to laboratory methods and emerging technologies for examining epigenetics.
  • This course is cross-listed with NUTR 660 in the NUTR 660 department.

EHS668: Professional Seminar in Occupational Health

  • Graduate level
  • Both Residential and OJOC
  • Winter term(s) for OJOC and residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for OJOC and residential students;
  • Instructor(s): O'Neill, Marie
  • Last offered Winter 2021
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: Seminars in contemporary occupational health topics and issues. Presentations by noted authorities from industry, labor organizations, governments, and academia.

EHS672: Healthy and Sustainable Foods and Products- Life Cycle Assessment

  • Graduate level
  • Residential and Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Fall term(s) for residential students; Fall term(s) for online MPH students; Fall term(s) for online MS students.
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students; 3 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 3 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Jolliet, Olivier (Residential); Jolliet, Olivier (Online MPH); Jolliet, Olivier (Online MS);
  • Last offered Fall 2020
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course describes how consumption, products and foods affect impacts on health and environment. After addressing the major health determinants, we assess diets nutritional and sustainable performances. We use LCA to analyze the environmental impact of products, with focus on chemicals in consumer products, discussing the path towards sustainable consumption.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. To identify the key factors impacting health and the environment, including the roles played by products. 2. To assess and compare the nutritional and sustainable performances of foods, accounting for both the consumer health and the environment. 3. To provide tools and practice opportunities for Environmental Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to assess the environmental impact of products and systems over the whole product life cycle 4. To set the fundamentals for comparative risks of chemicals in consumer products. 5. To adequately relate risk and impacts on human health to consumption and production, from single products to sustainable consumption.

EHS674: Environmental and Health Risk Modeling

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Jolliet, Olivier (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Good knowledge in calculus
  • Advisory Prerequisites: Principles of risk assessment
  • Description: EHS 674 uses a hands-on approach to experiment and interpret modeling techniques applied to environmental health assessment. It first addresses steady-state multi-media modeling, exposure modeling, dermal uptake and pharmacokinetic modeling. It then expands the theory to dynamic modeling and Monte-Carlo approaches applied to probalistic risk assessment.

EHS675: Data Analysis for Environmental Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Park, Sung Kyun (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2021
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 560 and EPID 503 or 600
  • Description: This course will introduce non-parametric smoothing methods, such as splines, locally weighted polynomial regression (LOESS) and generalized additive models (GAM), and focus on continuous environmental exposure variables. It will also deal with analysis of correlated data, including longitudinal analysis and time-series analysis that are widely used in environmental epidemiology. It will provide an opportunity to analyze actual population data to learn how to model environmental epidemiologic data, and is designed particularly for students who pursue environmental epidemiologic research. The course will consist of lectures and hands-on practices in computer labs, homework assignments and final projects. R, a free software environment for statistical computing and graphics, will be used.
Concentration Competencies that EHS675 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EPID Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology MPH Interpret epidemiologic results from higher-order biostatistical techniques applied to these data, such as linear regression, logistic regression, mixed effects models, and graphic techniques EHS675

EHS687: Professional Development in Environmental Health Sciences I

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 0.5 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Robins, Thomas (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: The course is open to all EHS MPH students who are in the 1st term of their 1st year in the program.
  • Description: This course is an introduction to professional development. Students will learn about: many aspects of the Department of Environmental Health Sciences, and resources available in SPH and in the broader U-M environment. It includes introductions to required Learning Agreements, Internships, and the Applied Practical Experience (APEx).
  • Learning Objectives: Students who complete this class are expected to be able to do the following: - Define their internship interests and pursue internship that fulfills APEx requirements - Produce professional documents (e.g. resume) to facilitate obtaining an internship - Identify and access available career and library resources - Prepare to meet APEx requirements by learning about APEx plans, learning agreements, and products.

EHS688: Professional Development in Environmental Health Sciences II

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 0.5 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Robins, Thomas (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: The course is open to all EHS MPH students who are in the 2nd term of their 1st year in the program. It is expected that enrolled students have completed EHS 687 Environmental Health Sciences Prof. Development, Part I in the 1st term of their 1st year
  • Description: This course is designed to introduce students to the Department of Environmental Health Sciences, resources available in School of Public Health and the broader University of Michigan environment, to prepare students for their internship experience, and to introduce students to different types of careers in environmental health.
  • This course is cross-listed with .

EHS689: Professional Development In Environmental Health Sciences Iii

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Robins, Thomas (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: EHS MPH students only
  • Advisory Prerequisites: Completion of approved internship and APEx, research or practical experience.
  • Description: This course is designed to connect training in EHS with the complex challenges associated with working in professional organizations. As the third professional development course of the EHS MPH program, EHS 689 concludes and integrates the summer field experience, and completion of the Applied Practical Experience requirement, with academic concepts.

EHS690: Practice in Global Environmental Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Xi, Chuanwu (Residential);
  • Last offered Fall 2020
  • Prerequisites: Instructor Approval
  • Description: The course will be divided into three sections: Section 1, Introduction of a variety aspects of internships in global environmental health; Section 2, working with individual faculty (advisor) to select an international project and prepare funding applications; and Section 3; present the proposed project in class.

EHS697: Readings

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr
  • Description: Supervised study/review of a selected topic in environmental health, occupational health, nutrition and/or toxicology. May be elected more than once for a maximum of six credits.

EHS698: Research

  • Graduate level
  • Both Residential and OJOC
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for OJOC and residential students;
  • 1-6 credit hour(s) for OJOC and residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Original research investigation of a special topic in environmental health, occupational health, nutrition and/or toxicology. May be elected more than once for a maximum of six credits.

EHS699: Master's Thesis

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Perm of Thesis Advisor
  • Description: This course shall be elected by students enrolled in Master's degree programs that require a formal written thesis as a condition of program completion. The thesis shall be defended in front of the student's thesis committee. The course grade will reflect the student's accomplishments relative to the thesis and its defense. The course is to be elected only once.

EHS717: Toxicological Pathology Laboratory

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Bergin, Ingrid (Residential);
  • Offered Every other year (Next semester: Fall 2022)
  • Prerequisites: EHS 616 or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: This laboratory course will provide an introduction to the histopathology associated with chemical exposures. Students will perform routine histological maneuvers on tissues from rats treated with "unknown" chemicals. Following microscopic inspection of tissues, students will describe the pathological process produced in each tissue and will identify the class of (or specific) chemical to which the organism was exposed.

EHS757: Occupational Health Aspects of Industrial Processes

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Schiller, Bert (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: EHS 550 or equiv and Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Observation and discussion of selected industrial processes, potential hazards, and controls. Potential hazards include chemical, physical, biological, and ergonomic. Emphasis on application and integration of different aspects of occupational health management. Field trips to various industrial plants. Guest lectures and student-lead discussions. Intended for second-year Industrial Hygiene and Occupational Medicine students.

EHS801: Professional Development In Environmental Health Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Dolinoy, Dana (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Professional Development in Environmental Health Sciences is an upper graduate-level course designed for Doctoral Students. Other students and post-doctoral fellows/auditors are welcome, if space allows. The course will cover professional development skills essential to early career success and to prepare students for a professional career in environmental health sciences.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Develop effective job search strategies 2. Develop career appropriate documents (CV, resume, biosketch) 3. Critically assess personal values and their integration into career planning and goal development 4. Compose a narrative around your research interest and career goals 5. Explain and exhibit the underlying concepts around networking 6. Simulate interviewing and negotiation tactics for first career positions in various formats (virtual, in-person)

EHS850: Research Design And Proposal Development In Environmental Health Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Batterman, Stuart Charles, Simone (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Students will be able to understand all parts of the research process including conceptualization of a research question, formulation of hypotheses, development of a research plan, selection of appropriate methods from a variety of data collection strategies, development of an appropriate data analysis plan, and preparation of a research proposal.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Differentiate between key funding agencies for public health and understand their mandates 2. Review and evaluate the quality of scientific literature including identifying knowledge gaps 3. Develop a scientific idea by conducting a critical assessment of current literature and preliminary results 4. Develop hypotheses to test in a scientific study 5. Differentiate between research strategies pertinent to proposed hypotheses 6. Describe selected research strategies to test outlined hypotheses 7. Design a plan for analyzing data pertinent to scientific study 8. Construct a mock grant proposal around research topic of interest (specifically specific aims, significance, innovation, and approach sections of a grant application)

EHS869: Research Critiques And Scientific Communications In Ehs

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Svoboda, Laurie (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: EHS PhD or MS Student Status
  • Description: This is a seminar course for PhD students, MS students and other interested scholars to learn and practice scientific presentation and communication skills (including communication to society) in the environmental health sciences. Students also practice critical analysis of scientific literature. Students will practice effective presentations (for in-person and remote settings).
  • Learning Objectives: Updated Learning Objectives: 1. Explain the critical importance of evidence in advancing public health knowledge 2. Demonstrate effective speaking, writing and exhibition of scientific science-related topics to a variety of audiences 3. Examine the components of a scientific paper and the peer-review process 4. Critically analyze and evaluate scientific literature 5. Describe and recognize elements of effective science communication 6. Construct and deliver effective and engaging presentations (written and oral) for lay audiences 7. Present scientific information using professional written and verbal communication formats 8. Evaluate scientific presentations and seminars through peer-review process

EHS899: Advanced Research

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-6 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Original investigations of a specific topic in environmental health, occupational health, nutrition and/or toxicology. Designed for doctoral students performing research prior to passing their qualifying exam. May be elected more than once.

EHS990: Dissertation/Pre-Candidacy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to status as candidate.

EHS995: Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students who have been admitted to status as candidate.

PUBHLTH514: Public Health Sciences and the Environment

  • Graduate level
  • Residential and Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a first year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for residential students; Winter term(s) for online MPH students; Winter term(s) for online MS students.
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Neitzel, Richard (Residential); Neitzel, Richard (Online MPH); Neitzel, Richard (Online MS);
  • Prerequisites: MPH, MHI, or MHSA Residential Students Only or By Instructor Permission
  • Description: Many public health outcomes are directly influenced by human contact with the environment. This course will explore an important discipline within public health, environmental health sciences- that is, the study of how environmental factors affect human health and disease. We will apply environmental health and systems thinking principles to evaluate several major threats to public health: climate change, the built environment, and environmental justice issues. We will also assess the effectiveness of policies designed to address and reduce the threats presented by these and other issues.
  • Learning Objectives: After completion of the course, students should be able to: --Explain the critical importance of evidence in advancing public health knowledge (CEPH LO 6)--Explain effects of environmental factors on a population's health (CEPH LO 7, linked to competency M1, CEPH C15) --Explain how globalization affects global burdens of disease (CEPH LO 11, linked to competency CEPH C22) --Apply process mapping methods to systematically evaluate the generation and movement of environmental hazards on the public (linked to competency CEPH C22) --Explain the impact of pollution control policies on public health outcomes (linked to competency CEPH C15) --Explain how environmental and occupational exposures can be measured and connected to human health (linked to competency M1) --Explain why a focus on sensitive and vulnerable groups is critical in environmental health science (linked to competency CEPH C15) --Explain strategies that can be applied to reduce environmental and occupational hazards
  • This course is required for the school-wide core curriculum
Concentration Competencies that PUBHLTH514 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
Population and Health Sciences MS Demonstrate knowledge of the major issues and current research problems in population health using at least two key disciplines (e.g., biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health, nutritional science). PUBHLTH511, PUBHLTH512, PUBHLTH514, PUBHLTH515