Health Behavior and Health Education Courses

HBEHED540: Fundamentals of Reproductive Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Owens, Lauren (Residential);
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: Recommend prior human physiol course
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: The course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of reproductive health, in the USA and internationally. The course will introduce students to historical trends in the global burden of reproductive ill-health, the social ecology of reproductive risk, clinical health practice, and current controversies in policy and practice. Through a comparative look at reproductive health needs (e.g. maternal morbidity, contraceptive use, STI care and HIV-related services), in a range of diverse social settings, we will critically examine the logic and impact of current international standards for RH policy and practice.

HBEHED550: HIV/AIDS: Perspectives on the state of affairs, science and response to a global pandemic

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Amico, K. Rivet (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: About 35 million people are currently living with HIV, with 71% living in sub-Saharan Africa. For the first time, new treatments and strategies to prevent onward transmission have brought a vision of an "AIDS free generation". The influence of research, dissemination, policy and advocacy underlie US and International HIV/AIDS Strategies, which are uniformly adopting aggressive goals for eliminating new cases of HIV in the next decade. From the "cascade of HIV care" a new road map towards prevention and treatment has emerged and the role of individual health promotion, community engagement, health systems reforms, and policy are pivotal in achieving sustainable success in ending HIV. This course provides an overview of past, current and emerging issues in HIV-prevention, HIV testing, linkage and retention in HIV care, access to HIV treatment and achieving durable viral suppression in diverse domestic and global contexts from biological, social, structural, cultural and psychological perspectives. The course structure will generally follow a strategy of presentation from experts, advocates and affected individuals, targeted readings, lecture and discussion of a specific area on the prevention or treatment cascade, followed by lectures and activities that consolidate material presented and assigned for a given area. Most weeks have a planned combination of guest experts/speakers, readings, lecture, and activities that mobilize information into knowledge, ideas and insights.

HBEHED578: Practical Projects

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Practical projects in the application of theory and principles of Health Behavior and Health Education to individual and community-based public health settings. Course requirements include an approved practical project related to Health Behavior and Health Education in consultation with a faculty advisor. THE EXPERIENCE IS REPORTED IN AN INTEGRATIVE PAPER DEMONSTRATING THE SCIENTIFIC APPLICATION OF HBHE THEORIES AND PRINCIPLES TO THE PRACTICAL PROJECT. May be elected more than once. Enrollment limited to Health Behavior and Health Education majors with at least two full terms of prior registration.

HBEHED590: Principles of Community Engagement for Health Promotion

  • Graduate level
  • Online MPH only
  • This is a first year course for Online students
  • Spring-Summer term(s) for online MPH students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for online MPH students;
  • Instructor(s): Fleming, Paul (Online MPH);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course will help students better prepare for engaging community members and community-based organizations for public health work. The course has three major focus areas: (1) Consideration of power, privilege, and social identities in community engagement, (2) Strategies for engaging stakeholders and building coalitions, (3) CBPR principles and other models of community engagement.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of the course, students are expected to: (1) Demonstrate critical self-reflection of how social identities, power, unearned advantage/disadvantage, and privilege impact community engagement work (2) Describe the ethical considerations for community engagement (autonomy vs. paternalism) (3) Apply the 9 principles of Community-based Participatory Research and its Core Components/Phases and how this fits with ethical considerations (4) Identify different types of stakeholder groups for a given health issue and motivations/perspectives of each (5) Strategize how to build a coalition for a specific health issue in a specific health setting (6) Demonstrate understanding of interpersonal skills required for effective community engagement
Concentration Competencies that HBEHED590 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
Population and Health Sciences MPH Design multisector collaborations that will support all phases of population health improvement (assessment, planning, implementation, evaluation) PUBHLTH515, HBEHED590, HBEHED591, PUBHLTH511

HBEHED591: Planning and Implementing Health Promotion Programs

  • Graduate level
  • Online MPH only
  • This is a first year course for Online students
  • Spring-Summer term(s) for online MPH students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for online MPH students;
  • Instructor(s): Lopez, William (Online MPH);
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Advisory Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course examines focuses on planning and implementing health promotion programs broadly defined, including health communication, health education, policy advocacy, environmental change, health service provision, and community mobilization. By the end of the course, students will understand and apply key concepts related to developing a health promotion program.
  • Learning Objectives: Course Goals: By the end of this course, students should be able to: Describe approaches to health promotion programs; Identify a health issue and priority population; Consider historical and structural factors that may impact the priority population and/or the health promotion program; Critically assess the relevant literature; Develop a vision, SMART goals, and program objectives that address the health issue; Create program activities and evaluation plans that link to goals and objectives; Construct a program implementation timeline (i.e. Gantt Chart) and work plan; Calculate a budget and justify budgetary expenses; and Consider the needed membership for a multisector collaboration. By successfully completing this course, students will acquire the Following Foundational competencies: HBHE Concentration Competencies: Specify approaches for planning, implementing, and managing sociobehavioral health education-focused programs and/or policies to promote human health. Foundational Competencies: Design a population-based policy, program, project or intervention. Program Competencies: Design multisector collaborations that will support all phases of population health improvement (assessment, planning, implementation, evaluation). This course substantially covers material related to the following competencies: HBHE Concentration Competencies: Assess population needs, assets and capacities that affect communities’ health. By the end of this course, students will have been exposed to the following Foundational Learning Objectives:
Concentration Competencies that HBEHED591 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
Population and Health Sciences MPH Design multisector collaborations that will support all phases of population health improvement (assessment, planning, implementation, evaluation) PUBHLTH515, HBEHED590, HBEHED591, PUBHLTH511

HBEHED592: Health Program Evaluation

  • Graduate level
  • Online MPH only
  • This is a first year course for Online students
  • Fall term(s) for online MPH students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for online MPH students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Prerequisites: Population and Health Sciences MPH
  • Advisory Prerequisites: .
  • Description: The goal of this course is to teach students how to design evaluations and become critical consumers of evaluation reports. This course covers the theoretical concepts and methodologies of evaluation including process and impact evaluation, evaluation designs and threats to validity, measurement, and basic quantitative and qualitative data analysis basics.
  • Learning Objectives: Course Goals/Foundational Competencies (FC) ● Select methods to evaluate public health programs (CEPH #11). ● Apply research and evaluation methods to understand the effect of health education and health behavior interventions (HBHE #3). Learning Objectives Specifically, you will be able to: 1. Articulate the role of systematic evaluation in public health. 2. Describe the types of evaluations, their purpose and the typical strategies of each. 3. Create logic models of programs and use them to formulate evaluation questions. 4. Understand and address validity and reliability in evaluation designs and measurement. 5. Gain familiarity with common methods of collecting high quality evaluation data. 6. Critically review evaluation reports. 7. Design and communicate an evaluation plan that is suitable for a specific program.

HBEHED593: Theoretical Foundations for Understanding Psychosocial Determinants of Health

  • Graduate level
  • Online MPH only
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Fall term(s) for online MPH students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for online MPH students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Prerequisites: None, but is only available to online MPH students
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Description: HBEHED 593 is a 2-credit course designed to provide an overview of the psychosocial determinants that affect the health of individuals, communities, and populations. This course addresses these determinants within theories, models, and frameworks of health behavior and explores the practical application of theory to public health practice.
  • Learning Objectives: Course Competencies This course substantially covers material related to the following HBHE Concentration Competencies:  Describe how to use social-ecological and life course frameworks to address key determinants of health and health disparities through programs and policies  Apply relevant social and behavioral science theories, concepts and models that are designed to understand and modify health behavior Course Learning Objectives By successfully completing this course, students will be able to:  Distinguish between a theory, model, and framework  Explain behavioral and psychological factors that affect a population’s health through the use of relevant social and behavioral science theories, models, and frameworks  Describe the role of social and behavioral science theories, models, and frameworks in identifying appropriate points of intervention  Evaluate the strengths and limitations of different social and behavioral science theories, models, and frameworks  Apply social and behavioral science theories, models, and frameworks to understand a public health issue and to identify appropriate intervention approaches.

HBEHED597: Clear Health Communication

  • Graduate level
  • Online MPH only
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for online MPH students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for online MPH students;
  • Instructor(s): Zikmund-Fisher, Brian (Online MPH);
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 501, Pubhlth 508, Pubhlth 510, Pubhlth 511, Pubhlth 512, Pubhlth 513, Pubhlth 514, and Pubhlth 515
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course covers a variety of techniques and skills that lead to clear health communications, including ways of making health data more understandable and health messages more memorable. Participants practice these skills through a series of exercises and through creation of health communication products.
  • Learning Objectives: 1) Define clear, audience-appropriate goals for a health communication 2) Identify and use features of messages to increase message memorability (i.e., stickiness) 3) Identify and provide contextual information to make health data (e.g., test results, risk statistics) more intuitively understandable and usable by different audiences 4) Evaluate to what degree health messages follow best practices such as using plain language 5) Apply principles of user-centered design and usability testing to develop and refine health messages using audience input.

HBEHED600: Psychosocial Factors in Health-Related Behavior

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Patel, Minal (Residential);
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: HBHE 600 provides an overview of the psychosocial determinants of behavioral risk factors that affect health. We address these determinants within theories, models, and frameworks of health-related behavior.
Concentration Competencies that HBEHED600 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
HBHE MPH Describe how to use social-ecological and life course perspectives to address key determinants of health and health disparities through programs and policies HBEHED600
HBHE MPH Apply relevant social and behavioral science theories, concepts and models that are designed to understand and modify health behavior HBEHED600

HBEHED605: Human Sexuality across the Life Course

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Gamarel, Kristi (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course is designed to provide students with an introduction of the major theories and principles guiding human sexuality as well as recent developments in sexuality health research; develop their understanding of methodological and assessment issues in the study of sexuality; and familiarize them with the extent to which sexuality research and principles inform public health efforts promoting sexual health. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and critically assess: (1) major concepts, theories and perspectives guiding a multidisciplinary understanding of human sexuality; (2) recent developments in sexuality research; (3) methodological aspects in the study of sexuality; and (4) how sexuality research informs public health practice and sexual health education strategies.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of the course, students will be able to identify and critically assess: 1. Major concepts, theories and perspectives guiding a multidisciplinary understanding of human sexuality across the life course; 2. Recent developments in sexuality research; 3. Methodological aspects in the study of sexuality; 4. How sexuality research informs public health practice and how sexual health is promoted in health education strategies.

HBEHED610: Issues in Public Health Ethics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Roberts, Scott (Residential);
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Description: This course will address a range of issues in public health ethics. The first part of the course will provide an introduction to key ethical frameworks and concepts relevant to public health, and it will describe the overlap and distinctions between public health and medical ethics. The remainder of the course will use a case-based approach to considering ethical dilemmas in several domains, including the following: 1) resource allocation and distributive justice; 2) questions of autonomy and paternalism; 3) health promotion & disease prevention; 4) clinical care; 5) research ethics; and 6) emerging issues in public health ethics. The course will use a blend of lectures and group discussions to consider topics of interest. Students will play an active role in researching, presenting, and writing up case studies that will be used to illustrate ethical concepts and conflicts and to facilitate class discussion.
  • Syllabus for HBEHED610

HBEHED613: Confronting and Addressing Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Healthcare

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Patel, Minal (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Advisory Prerequisites: none
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: Reducing racial/ethnic health disparities is core to the mission of public health. This course provides an in-depth examination of racial/ethnic disparities specific to healthcare and healthcare delivery in the United States. This course will critically appraise 1) the causes of these disparities including mistrust, and differential access, communication and treatment, 2) frameworks, theory, and measurement to examine disparities in care and 3) interventions to address healthcare-specific disparities, and change behavior at multiple levels of influence (policy/regulatory, health system/delivery, healthcare provider, and patient/individual). We will examine trends and critical issues in racial/ethnic healthcare disparities before and after the seminal Institute of Medicine Report- Unequal Treatment, and the passage of the Affordable Care Act.
  • Learning Objectives: 10. Explain the social, political and economic determinants of health and how they contribute to population health and health inequities
  • Syllabus for HBEHED613

HBEHED614: Women's Health and the Timing of Reproduction

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3-4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Geronimus, Arline T (Residential);
  • Offered every other year
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Applies a systems perspective to examine the personal, social, and cultural factors that influence the age at which women initiate childbearing and the implications of these factors for the health of women and infants. Topics include teenage childbearing, Black American fertility patterns, infant mortality, ethnographic and other research methods, and related policy issues. Reviews current, historical, and cross-cultural examples. Students apply course concepts and methodologies to specific research and policy questions.

HBEHED615: Sexual Health Promotion

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Harper, Gary (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course will provide students with the background, knowledge, and experience needed to create different types of sexual health promotion interventions for diverse populations in multiple setting. Students will explore socio-ecological factors that influence the sexual health of diverse populations, and learn how to develop/implement theory-based and culturally-appropriate interventions.

HBEHED617: Global Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): King, Elizabeth (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: In this course, we discuss globalization and health, major actors/organizations in global health, global health inequities, and "hot topics" in global health. This course is designed to help students critically think about how to apply key concepts and skills in health behavior and health education to understanding global health issues.

HBEHED620: Behavioral Research Methods in Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Both Residential and Online MPH
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Fall term(s) for residential students; Fall term(s) for online MPH students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students; 3 credit hour(s) for online MPH students;
  • Instructor(s): Hsieh, Hsing-Fang (Residential); Zimmerman, Marc (Online MPH);
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Principles of design of behavioral research on public health problems and programs. Objectives, philosophy, and methods of science including causal inference, the role of hypotheses, criteria for establishing adequate hypotheses, research designs and data collection techniques. Formulation of a research problem within a program setting.

HBEHED622: Program Evaluation in Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Reddock, Ebony (Residential);
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 503 or equiv. and a course dealing with health education program development
  • Description: Examination and application, through a series of exercises, of several program evaluation models relevant for health education, including the goal attainment, goal-free, systems responsive, and decision-theoretic models, with emphasis on both process and impact analysis. Design options for measuring program effect, with the associated threats and external validity, are discussed, and several basic statistical techniques are reviewed and examined in terms of their applicability to program evaluation, including sampling and sample size determination for both surveys and experiments.
Concentration Competencies that HBEHED622 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
HBHE MPH Apply research and evaluation methods to understand the effect of health education and health behavior interventions HBEHED622

HBEHED624: Needs Assessment Methods for Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Mehdipanah, Roshanak (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course will cover a mixed-methods approach to conducting needs assessments; including collection of primary data (e.g. surveys, focus groups, and interviews) and secondary data (e.g. agency, state statistics, and census). Furthermore, a global perspective will be used to study various international efforts using health equity needs assessments.

HBEHED625: Research in Health Behavior

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Inst.
  • Description: Individual work on a problem in the area of health behavior relevant to program effectiveness in public health, under the tutorial guidance of an appropriate staff member. Regular conferences are arranged to discuss research designs, proposed problem solutions, methods for data collection and analysis. The investigation is reported in a paper, which may be submitted for publication. May be elected more than once.

HBEHED626: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Health Behaviors

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Mistry, Ritesh (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None.
  • Description: GIS offer useful tools for collecting, mapping and analyzing health data. The course focuses on how to use GIS to understand the geography of health, health behaviors, and health disparities. Students will learn to use ESRI's ArcGIS for introductory data management, mapping and geographic data analysis.

HBEHED629: Families and Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Chatters, Linda (Residential);
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course will examine families as a primary context for understanding health and health-related behaviors. Major topics include: 1) models and theories of the family, 2) history and current status of family-based practice, 3) the impact of demographic trends and their impact on family structure and functioning, 4) family diversity with respect to social status groups, ethnicity, and culture and their implications for understanding health phenomena, 5) families as the context for socialization to health beliefs and practices, 6) the provision of family-based care, and 7) health profiles of family members and their family roles.
  • This course is cross-listed with HB727 (School of Social Work) in the School of Social Work department.

HBEHED630: Aging and Health Behavior

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Connell, Cathleen (Residential);
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: Graduate standing
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course provides an overview of trends in aging and health with a particular focus on health behaviors and health promotion. Age-related changes in health and health behavior and the impact of societal and personal attitudes toward aging on health behaviors will be discussed. Successful aging, an emerging paradigm for gerontology, will frame the discussion of strategies for facilitating optimal health behaviors among older adults. Current recommendations and practices and multi-level interventions that focus on specific health behaviors such as physical activity, smoking, nutrition, as well as chronic disease self-management, will be presented. Evidence of the impact of health behaviors on overall health and well-being for diverse populations will be presented and discussed.
  • Learning Objectives: Foundational Learning Objectives Profession and Science of Public Health 1. Explain the role of quantitative and qualitative methods and sciences in describing and assessing a population's health 4. List major causes and trends of morbidity and mortality in the US 5. Discuss the science of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention in population health, including health promotion, screening, etc. 6. Explain the critical importance of evidence in advancing public health knowledge Factors Related to Human Health 9. Explain behavioral and psychological factors that affect a population's health 10. Explain the social, political and economic determinants of health and how they contribute to population health and health inequities
  • Syllabus for HBEHED630

HBEHED631: Project Management in Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: Prior completion of HBHE651 Program Development in Health Education
  • Advisory Prerequisites: Prior completion of PUBHLTH 513 or HBEHED 651
  • Description: HBEHED 631: Project Management in Public Health is a 3-credit course designed to provide an introduction to budgeting and related administrative skills and strategies relevant to managing public health programs. Students will build skills in hiring and managing teams, developing work plans, building and managing budgets, monitoring budget changes, and responding to funder inquiries. This course requires students to work in teams and use project management software to simulate the management of workflow and activities of a public health project.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of the course, students will be able to: 1. Understand different types of funding sources and how budget development/management differs for each. 2. Develop, monitor, and modify a public health project budget. 3. Develop a project work plan. 4. Use project management tools to monitor progress toward project aims. 5. Create a team work flow that supports collaboration and outlines decision making processes. 6. Adopt a group vision that guides the work of a team. 7. Understand factors that facilitate the hiring and management of human resources for projects. 8. Develop effective communications about budget and project progress for funding agencies.

HBEHED633: Social Networks and Social Support in Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Caldwell, Cleo (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr. and Grad Status
  • Description: Review and analysis of theory and empirical evidence concerning social networks and social support and their relationship to health status and health behavior. Examines utilization of social networks in health education programs, e.g., family network interventions, self-help groups, "natural helpers", community organizing.

HBEHED634: Child Health and Development

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Miller, Alison (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: N/A
  • Advisory Prerequisites: Graduate student standing
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: Health outcomes for many children in the United States lag behind those of other developed countries. Moreover, significant socio-economic disparities exist in child morbidity and mortality. This course takes a developmental and social-contextual perspective on child health in the US, focusing on key concepts, current issues and intervention approaches.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of this course students will be able to: 1. Describe common child health concerns at different points in development 2. Articulate mechanisms and contextual factors that influence child health 3. Analyze how child developmental stage can affect intervention approach and effectiveness 4. Recommend developmentally-appropriate intervention strategies

HBEHED638: Qualitative Methods in Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): King, Elizabeth (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor
  • Description: This is a course about doing qualitative social research in public health. One of its major goals is very practical and down to earth: acquiring the strategies and techniques needed to conduct qualitative research on human behavior. But the course also aspires to understand the philosophical, ethical, and political issues involved in the practice of social science within public health. The course will focus upon five phases of the research process: l) pre-research dilemmas and decisions, 2) theory and the formulation of the research question or hypothesis, 3) design, sampling, and data collection, 4) stages of data analysis, and 5) the implications of qualitative knowledge for representation of "subjects" and the expression of this knowledge in the form of written reports or publications.

HBEHED640: Community Organization for Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Israel, Barbara (Residential);
  • Offered every year
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr. and Grad Status
  • Description: Examines social and structural factors associated with health and illness; concepts and theories regarding planned change and community; and models and principles of community organization practice for health education. Several models of community organization are analyzed along the dimensions of: community diagnosis needs assessment, selection and implementation of action strategies, evaluation research, role of the professional and ethical considerations.

HBEHED641: Materials and Methods in Health Education Programs

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Patel, Minal (Residential);
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: The goal of this course is to enable participants to select and use learning materials and methods in health education programs. The course consists of in-class sessions where various materials and media are demonstrated and their utility as enhancements to learning discussed. Technical and production aspects of materials and media are considered in several lab sessions. Students are required to produce health education materials or develop learning activities through fieldwork in addition to in-class and lab sessions.

HBEHED644: Readings in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-6 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Review of literature on selected topics in health behavior, health education or related areas under guidance of faculty member. Critical analysis; written and oral reports. May be taken more than once for a total not to exceed 6 credit hours.

HBEHED645: Urban Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Mehdipanah, Roshanak (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course will introduce students to the foundations of how history, politics and structural determinants of health interact to crease urban health inequities in cities worldwide.
  • Learning Objectives: -Learn the foundations of global urban health including some of the stakeholders involved in city wide decision-making. -Gain understanding on some of the concepts of urban health and determinants of health including the social and physical factors like housing, urban design, employment, transportation and so on. -Develop a research plan to study an urban health issue in a city within the US including the proposal of solutions and recommendations to address the issue. -Develop a health communication campaign to drive policy change to address a city-specific issue.

HBEHED651: Program Development in Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Fleming, Paul (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: HBHE 600
  • Description: Focuses on design of effective health promotion/health education programs. Moves between theoretical bases for program development and examination of practical applications. Initial sessions focus on framework for development of health education/health promotion programs. Subsequent sessions center on specific components of intervention design and application.
Concentration Competencies that HBEHED651 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
HBHE MPH Specify approaches for planning, implementing, and managing socio-behavioral health education-focused programs and/or policies to promote human health HBEHED651
HBHE MPH Integrate principles and methods of community engagement, including ethical considerations, relevant to the design and implementation of health education programs and policies HBEHED651

HBEHED652: Group Process in Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Israel, Barbara (Residential);
  • Offered every other year
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Examines concepts, theories, and research in the field of group dynamics with particular application to health education. Emphasis on developing skills for observing, assessing, participating in, facilitating and evaluating small groups.

HBEHED653: Evidence-Informed Decision Making for 21st Century Health Care

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Veinot, Tiffany (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: At least one course in statistics
  • Description: Health consumers now have unprecedented access to health information, from published research to consumer health websites to electronic health records to peer narratives. Yet, consumers face challenges in acquiring, assessing and using health information. There is a growing need for professionals to support consumers in navigating the sea of information.
  • Learning Objectives: -Summarize, analyze and evaluate key features of a range of health sciences information sources. -Implement effective searches for health sciences information, and successfully evaluate search results. -Generate and implement training in optimal use of health information sources. -Critically appraise published health research. -Apply basic methods of research synthesis to health-related questions. -Evaluate strategies for personalizing evidence for consumers/patients.
  • This course is cross-listed with SI 653.

HBEHED654: Consumer Health Informatics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Veinot, Tiffany Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Consumer health informatics (CHI) gives health care consumers information and tools to facilitate their engagement. Students will become familiar with, and evaluate, a range of CHI applications. They will also assess the needs and technological practices of potential users, generate theory-informed design and implementation strategies, and select appropriate evaluation approaches.
  • This course is cross-listed with SI554.

HBEHED659: Introduction to Adolescent Substance Use Prevention

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Mistry, Ritesh (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: Students gain an overview of adolescent substance use prevention from a public health perspective. Students learn about the evidence-base on adolescent substance use prevention. They apply course content to create prevention interventions. The course examines both illicit (e.g., opiates, marijuana, methamphetamine) and licit (e.g., alcohol, tobacco) substances.
  • Learning Objectives: -Understand the magnitude of and trends in adolescent substance use in the US and globally. -Describe which adolescent populations are at greatest risk of substance use and its consequences. -Describe the consequences of adolescent substance use on adolescent health and development. -Understand and critically appraise the main theoretical perspectives that are used to explain what determines adolescent substance use, and progression in to abuse. -Articulate the empirical evidence about the determinants of adolescent substance use. -Identify and appraise existing programs and policies designed to prevent adolescent substance use. -Apply the above to develop a new or adapt an existing evidence-based program or policy to prevent adolescent substance use.

HBEHED660: Theory, Research and Practice in Adolescent Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Caldwell, Cleo (Residential);
  • Offered every other year
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Description: Examines educational efforts designed to promote better health outcomes among adolescents. Review developmental theories, research, and interventions to promote health in this population. Addresses various contexts for intervention programs and their implications. Topics covered include, but are not limited to, the effects of peer and family influences on health, resiliency, violence, alcohol and drug use, and sexual behavior.

HBEHED661: Designing Sticky Communications for Health Advocacy, Education, and Mass Media

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Zikmund-Fisher, Brian (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This class focuses on broadly applicable message design principles that help health education and promotion messages to "stick" in recipients' minds. In addition to deconstructing memorable messages at a basic level, we will also consider the potential uses (and misuses) of first person narratives.

HBEHED662: Risk Communication: Theory, Techniques, and Applications in Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Zikmund-Fisher, Brian (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course will provide students with a theoretical and practical understanding of when and why people feel their health is "at risk." We focus on building students' ability to use evidence based techniques that can increase understanding and use of health data by patients, communities, the media, and policy makers.

HBEHED663: The Use of Brief Interventions to Help People Change Health Behaviors: Evidence-Based Strategies for Work in Clinical and Community Settings

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Piette, John (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: N/A
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course gives students an understanding of how brief interventions are used to impact health behaviors and the approaches used to help people make and attain behavior-change goals. Students also gain skills in applying scientific evidence from randomized trials and systematic reviews in public health decision-making.

HBEHED665: Mobile Health: Text messaging, apps, and other mobile communication strategies to prevent disease and assist people living with chronic illnesses

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Piette, John (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: N/A
  • Description: The overall goal of this course is to give students the knowledge, skills and experience they need to participate in decision-making about developing, implementing, and continuing mHealth services addressing major public health and healthcare challenges.

HBEHED668: Health Communications for Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Resnicow, Ken (Residential);
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: HBHE 600
  • Description: From one-on-one health counseling to broad-based social marketing campaigns, a vast body of research over the past twenty years has demonstrated that numerous dimensions of health communications, including message format, receiver characteristics, and delivery channel can affect program impact. This course will address key considerations for constructing effective health communications including the application of behavior change theories and general marketing principles. Selected prior and current health promotion campaigns will be critically reviewed and students will be asked to develop a health communication intervention or social marketing campaign. Occasional guest lecturers, actively involved in development of health communication interventions will be integrated into the syllabus.

HBEHED669: Genetics, Health Behavior, and Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Roberts, Scott (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: SPH student or permission of instructor
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course addresses the following topics: genetics and risk communication; ethical issues in genetics research; the psychological and behavioral impact of genetic testing; public and professional knowledge and attitudes about genetics; health education needs in genetics; and emerging issues in the field (e.g., computerized delivery of genetic counseling services).
  • Syllabus for HBEHED669

HBEHED671: Motivational Interviewing in Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Resnicow, Ken (Residential);
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: HBEHED600, Perm Instr.
  • Description: In the past few years, there has been increased interest in using motivational interviewing (MI) in public health and medical settings. Originally developed for the treatment of addictive behaviors, MI has recently been used to address chronic disease and other public health conditions, such as smoking, diet, physical activity, diabetes management, and medical adherence. At its core, MI is a method for assisting individuals to work through their ambivalence about behavior change. Deeply rooted in the person-centered philosophy of Carl Rogers, MI counselors are trained to rely heavily on reflective listening, more so than direct questioning, persuasion, or provision of advice. This course will provide participants with an in-depth overview of MI and provide opportunities to practice the core techniques.
  • Syllabus for HBEHED671

HBEHED675: Culminating Seminar in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Szekeres, Kiran (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course complements the HBHE MPH core curriculum by assisting students with integrating their overall learning experience in the program via a series of culminating assignments. These are designed to support students in the process of reflecting on their internship and translating that knowledge into a professional presentation for relevant audiences. They also guide students in the successful completion of the Integrated Learning Experience.
  • Learning Objectives: This course does not substantially cover material related to Foundational Learning Objectives.

HBEHED677: Health Impacts Of Law Enforcement In The U.S.

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Lopez, William (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Advisory Prerequisites: none
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course draws on social-ecological model to consider the health impacts of law enforcement on individuals, families and communities and how state violence is shaped by anti-Black, -Latino, and -Arab racism. Data, books, and media will catalyze discussion and analysis of how law enforcement impacts communities throughout the U.S.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of this course, students will have been exposed to the following Foundational Learning Objectives: -Objective4: List major causes and trends of morbidity and mortality in the US or other community relevant to the school or program -Objective10: Explain the social, political, and economic determinants of health and how they contribute to population health and health inequities

HBEHED679: Historical Roots of Health Inequities

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Fleming, Paul (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This 3-credit course offers an examination of U.S. health inequities from a historical lens and discussion of present-day issues. Through the readings, discussions, and assignments in this class, students will better understand historical policies, events, and movements that have led to health inequities and connect those to contemporary issues in the United States and within the field of public health. The course takes an intersectional perspective to examine health inequities, with a focus on inequities related to race, ethnicity, gender, and class.
  • Learning Objectives: (Note, these are from the CEPH Foundational Learning Objectives) 1. Explain public health history, philosophy and values 4. List major causes and trends of morbidity and mortality in the US or other community relevant to the school or program 10. Explain the social, political and economic determinants of health and how they contribute to population health and health inequities

HBEHED690: Environmental Health Promotion

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Schulz, Amy (Residential);
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: HBHE 600 or Permission of Instructor
  • Description: This class applies health education principles towards understanding and intervening on different environmental hazards. The course will review various kinds of environmental issues, including biochemical toxins, physical hazards, and psychosocial stressors. Students will learn about select datasources from which they may obtain environmental health information. The course will examine the literature on risk and environmental health education and explore how health educators can use resources and conceptual tools to address environmental concerns. This course will also examine case studies from individual communities as focal points for discussion. Based on these case studies, students will explore whether extant theories and approaches can help protect vulnerable populations, insure environmental justice, and reduce health disparities. The format of this class is a combination of lecture and discussion.
Concentration Competencies that HBEHED690 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Environmental Health Promotion and Policy MPH Evaluate strategies to promote environmental health HBEHED690

HBEHED693: Seminar on Health and Poverty

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Geronimus, Arline T (Residential);
  • Offered every other year
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Explores dimensions of poverty in terms of the interrelationships of socioeconomic status, racism, minority status and health. The focus is on the United States and topics discussed include different conceptualizations of and perspectives on the relationship of poverty to health, issues in child and family health, in urban and rural poverty and health, and issues relevant to improving health services and health policy targeted at socioeconomically disvantanged populations.

HBEHED700: Advanced Quantitative Methods in Health Behavior

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Heinze, Justin (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: N/A
  • Description: This course is an advanced research methods course focused on the quantitative conceptualization and analysis of health behavior research. The course emphasizes the application of multivariate regression to practical questions in public health, and includes an overview of three regression-related techniques: Structural Equation Modeling (SEM), hierarchical linear modeling (HLM), and growth curve modeling (GCM).

HBEHED710: Special MPH Topics in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-6 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Kostanecki, Eileen King, Elizabeth Heinze, Justin Amico, K. Rivet (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: Master's level seminar designed to provide an extensive review of a number of substantive and methods and skill areas in health behavior and health education. Readings, discussion and assignments are organized around issues of mutual interest to faculty and students. Reviews and reports on topics required in the areas selected. May be elected more than once.

HBEHED715: Ethical, Legal, & Social Issues in Genomics and Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1.5 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Roberts, Scott (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
  • Advisory Prerequisites: Prior experience with ethical, legal, and social issues raised by genomics
  • Description: Genetics and genomics research are rapidly generating scientific discoveries, technological advances, and clinical applications, each with important implications for medicine and public health. In order for the promise of the "genomics revolution" to be achieved, however, numerous ethical, legal and social implications (ELSI) will need to be addressed. This weekly seminar will address a wide range of ELSI issues involved in the following areas: implementation of genetic screening and testing in medical, public health and direct-to-consumer contexts; ethics of genetics research, including challenges around informed consent, data privacy, and return of individual research results; and legal and policy options for the regulation of genetic testing, genomic research, and precision medicine.
  • Learning Objectives: 1) Gain awareness of and appreciation for a variety of ethical, legal, and social issues raised by developments in genomic science; 2) Learn about methodological skills involved in the conduct of ELSI research and communication about genomics research and applications; and 3) Enhance professional development through written and oral assignments, critical review of scientific literature, and networking with faculty and peers with mutual interests in genomics and ELSI issues.

HBEHED733: Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR)

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Israel, Barbara (Residential);
  • Offered every other year
  • Prerequisites: Doctoral Student or Advanced Masters Students with permission
  • Description: The involvement of community members in research and scholarship has emerged as a critical component for public health research. This doctoral student seminar focuses on the ways in which researchers and community members collaborate to conduct research that leads to community change, and improvement in health and quality of life. Such efforts often call for clarifications and/or redefinitions of: scientists' roles and methods, the knowledge development roles of participating community members, and the varying meanings of "community." Attention will be paid to scholarly debates, practical, and methodological issues in the conduct of community-based participatory research. This seminar will address the major issues and methods involved in conducting community-based participatory research across different disciplines. It provides the opportunity for graduate students from different schools and departments to come together to share perspectives, develop new skills and explore how they can apply this learning to community-based participatory research projects.

HBEHED800: Seminar in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Miller, Alison (Residential);
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Advanced study of principles of health behavior, educational and motivational approaches to improve health, and research and evaluative issues in health behavior and health education. Includes discussion of behavioral science and health education applications to public health, with special topics selected by students for review and discussion. Designed for doctoral students in Health Behavior and Health Education. May be elected more than once.

HBEHED823: Structural Influences on Health and Social Behavior

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Geronimus, Arline T (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: permission of instructor
  • Description: This doctoral seminar will draw on the public health and biomedical literature and also on constructs and literature from sociology, psychology, history, anthropology and demography to demonstrate how multi-disiciplinary theories and findings can be integrated to suggest a social-structural context for current public health problems. This structural understanding is designed to help HBHE doctoral students to reach candidacy with the ability to recognize the social patterning of health problems, and to discuss analytically the social structural influences, opportunities, and constraints affecting individual and social behavior, and, thereby, to develop research hypotheses and interventions or policies that take these into account. The course stresses the development of critical thinking skills, helps students recognize the social patterning of health problems, the historical influences on current health inequalities, and the ways that individual health knowledge and behavior can be reflexive, socially situated, and embedded within larger social, cultural, and historical contexts. The course also considers ways that structural forces may work through material, social psychological, and ultimately biological mechanisms to exert an impact on morbidity and mortality.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of the term, students should be able to : (1) explain what a structural perspective is and how a structural analysis differs from simply entering sociodemographic or economic variables into statistical models; (2) understand the importance of history, culture, pervasive ideology, social stratification, and institutionalization to current public health problems and proposed solutions; (3) be attuned to the social patterning of public health problems and their implications; (4) understand how structural dimensions of public health problems influence individual and social behavior;
Concentration Competencies that HBEHED823 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
HBHE PhD Interpret results from empirical analyses within the context of conceptual frameworks relevant for health promotion, and describe their public health relevance HBEHED823, preliminary exam

HBEHED885: Health Education Models of Practice and Interventions at the Community Level

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Israel, Barbara (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: HBHE doctoral students
  • Description: The course is designed as a doctoral seminar for HBHE doctoral students. The course will examine and critique current models of health education and behavior change which intervene at the community level to bring about behavior change which intervene at the community level to bring about behavior change. The focus will be on recognized health education interventions/strategies. Major topics will include: 1) methods for behavior change (i.e., community organizing; mass media, etc.); 2) policy activities; 3) organizational change activities; 4) advocacy activities; 5) community planning models. This course will also be available to second year HBHE masters students on a permission of instructor basis.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of this course students will be able to: 1. Identify and discuss various strategies and models of health education/health promotion interventions at other than the individual level. 2. Discuss and critique the theory, conceptual frameworks and constructs that serve as the basis of these models. 3. Articulate and critique assumptions underlying these models. 4. Apply these models and constructs to current public health problems. 5. Identify and discuss current evaluation strategies and challenges pertinent to these models. me as 685.
Concentration Competencies that HBEHED885 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
HBHE PhD Develop an innovative and efficient design for an empirical analysis of an intervention or observational study to address a research question with clear public health relevance HBEHED885, HBEHED886, preliminary exam
HBHE PhD Integrate theoretical frameworks (e.g., health belief model, social ecological model) with critical analysis of empirical data to identify gaps in current approaches to health promotion HBEHED885, HBEHED886, preliminary exam

HBEHED886: Theory-Driven Interventions Targeting Individual Behavior Change

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Gamarel, Kristi (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: HBHE doctoral students or Perm Instr
  • Description: The course will involve in-depth discussions of issues and problems in using conceptual models, theories of health behavior, and data to inform interventions targeting individual behavior change. Presentations will focus on the rationale for selection of a particular theory or theories, conceptual framework, how the theory or model was used to develop the intervention, measurement of theoretical constructs, and the barriers encountered in the implementation and evaluation phase of the research. Intervention research will include those that target clients, providers and families.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Describe the role of conceptual models and theories for informing interventions that promote individual behavior change. 2. Discuss the relative utility of various models and theories dependent on the research question and target audience. 3. Articulate the difficulties and limitations of health decision-making models in providing direction in intervention research. 4. Develop and defend a conceptual model using behavioral, social science, and health education theories/constructs to inform an intervention relevant to a current health problem. 5. Discuss current directions in research involving theory and practice.
Concentration Competencies that HBEHED886 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
HBHE PhD Develop an innovative and efficient design for an empirical analysis of an intervention or observational study to address a research question with clear public health relevance HBEHED885, HBEHED886, preliminary exam
HBHE PhD Integrate theoretical frameworks (e.g., health belief model, social ecological model) with critical analysis of empirical data to identify gaps in current approaches to health promotion HBEHED885, HBEHED886, preliminary exam

HBEHED900: Research in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 2-6 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Research work undertaken by doctoral students in collaboration with faculty advisers, including participation in on-going departmental research activities. Open only to doctoral students in Health Behavior and Health Education. May be elected more than once.

HBEHED990: Dissertation/Pre-Candidate

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Half Term (IIIA or IIIB, 1-4 credits) Election for dissertation work by doctoral students in Health Behavior and Health Education who are not yet admitted to status as a candidate.

HBEHED995: Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Half Term (IIIA or IIIB, 1-4 credits) Election for dissertation work by doctoral students admitted to status as candidate.

PUBHLTH507: Social Determinants of Health and Health Communication

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Lopez, William (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course covers issues related to health, particularly social, economic, and political factors that contribute to health inequalities and the development of strategies that focus on communication as a means to raise awareness and enhance the capacity of individuals and communities to participate efforts to reduce inequalities in health.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Use written and oral methods of communication to describe public health concepts with a range of different publics; 2. Consider how the social determinants of health impact the work they do; 3. Use written and oral communication methods to describe the social determinants of health to a lay audience.

PUBHLTH508: Social Determinants of Health

  • Graduate level
  • Online MPH only
  • This is a first year course for Online students
  • Fall term(s) for online MPH students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for online MPH students;
  • Instructor(s): Caldwell, Cleo (Online MPH);
  • Prerequisites: SPH MPH and SPH MHSA Residential Students Only or By Instructor Permission
  • Description: This course is designed to increase students' awareness, knowledge, and understanding of issues related to behavioral, psychological, and structural factors that contribute to understanding population health and health inequities. We will discuss key roles of health professionals in ensuring equitable treatment at multiple levels of influence to enhance population health and reduce health inequities through opportunities to practice skill building using case studies, deliberative dialogues and active listening strategies. This course will have a hybrid style (online & in-class) of instruction.
  • This course is required for the school-wide core curriculum

PUBHLTH510: Communication Fundamentals

  • Graduate level
  • Online MPH only
  • This is a first year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for online MPH students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for online MPH students;
  • Instructor(s): Zikmund-Fisher, Brian (Online MPH);
  • Prerequisites: SPH MPH and SPH MHSA Residential Students Only or By Instructor Permission
  • Description: This course will cover fundamental skills in how to communicate science and health information clearly to both scientific and non-scientific audiences. This course uses a blended format combining in-person sessions and online tasks to maximize students' ability to practice these skills.
  • This course is required for the school-wide core curriculum

PUBHLTH516: Leadership Skills for Interprofessional Practice

  • Graduate level
  • Both Residential and Online MPH
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for residential students; Winter term(s) for online MPH students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students; 1 credit hour(s) for online MPH students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: PUBHLTH 516 is an accelerated 7-week course that highlights foundational leadership skills needed by public health professionals to effectively work in interprofessional teams. Course themes include self-reflection on leadership style, growth mindset, fostering collaboration, motivating teams to accomplish goals, leading change, and guiding decision making.
  • Learning Objectives: Students should be able to: 1. Identify their leadership style. 2. Explain the importance of active learning and resilience in strengthening leadership skills. 3. Understand leadership structures across health sectors and the roles of public health professionals in leading change. 4. Describe the key domains of interprofessional practice. 5. Develop a mission, vision, and values to guide the work of teams. 6. Describe strategies to foster collaboration among interprofessional groups. 7. Compare strategies for motivating and influencing teams to accomplish goals. 8. Explain the relationship between leadership and learning through growth mindset principles. 9. Describe how interpersonal agility inspires risk-taking and collaboration.
  • This course is required for the school-wide core curriculum