Nutritional Sciences Courses

NUTR510: Nutrition in the Life Cycle

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Olivia (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Introductory biology and introductory chemistry
  • Description: Nutrition in the Life Cycle will cover nutritional needs of individuals during critical stages of development. Students will learn about the biological basis for nutritional requirements in normal development and maintaining health in adulthood. Consequences of over- and under-nutrition and how to identify and address these issues will be discussed.
  • This course is cross-listed with PUBHLTH310.

NUTR518: Food Literacy for All

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Leung, Cindy (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course offers a unique opportunity for students to gain an interdisciplinary overview of crises and opportunities in today's food system through a weekly lecture series bringing high-profile speakers to campus from diverse sectors: academia, grassroots movements, public health, farming, and more. Designed as an academic-community partnership, the course is led by a UM faculty member (Leung) with a leader in food justice in Detroit (Hebron), along with the program manager of the UM Sustainable Food Systems Initiative (Shapiro).
  • Learning Objectives: 1) Describe the term "food system" and influencing factors 2) Discuss how food systems impact public and environmental health 3) Describe strategies to promote health equity within local and national food systems 4) Propose opportunities for improving the food system and the social and environmental levels
  • This course is cross-listed with EAS 639 ENVIRON 314 PUBHLTH 318 (pending) in the SEAS, LSA Program in the Environment, SPH department.

NUTR540: Maternal and Child Nutrition

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Cole, Suzanne (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the nutritional requirements of pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Main topics include: physiologic and metabolic adaptations of pregnancy and lactation, maternal nutrition during pregnancy and lactation, composition of human milk and formula, feeding practices of infants and toddlers, and the nutrient requirements of infants, children, and adolescents. At the conclusion of this course, students will have gained a sufficient foundation in maternal and child nutrition to better understand the relevant scientific literature. Didactic lectures and guest presentations accompanied by class discussions will provide a breadth of maternal and child nutrition knowledge.

NUTR547: Food Science

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Aaronson, Susan (Residential);
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry
  • Description: An examination of food composition and the chemical and physical changes that result from food processing, preparation and cooking. Discussion of foods as complex systems containing a wide variety of chemicals including nutrients, phytochemicals, functional ingredients, natural or transferred toxins and additives. Discussion of changes in chemicals with different types of food preservation. Consideration of health risks associated with dietary exposure to selected nutrients and other chemicals. Exploration of the role of sensory analysis related to food acceptance. Overview of important regulations related to the content of food products.

NUTR555: Foundations of Sustainable Food Systems

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Jones, Andrew (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None.
  • Advisory Prerequisites: An introductory course in biology, environmental science, ecology, urban planning, food policy, epidemiology, and/or human nutrition
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course teaches about food systems through interdisciplinary, experiential learning and dialogue-based inquiry. In addition to learning how to bridge worldviews and apply systems thinking, students will study the unique perspectives of public health nutritionists involved in addressing complex food systems problems.

NUTR563: Transformative Food Systems

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1.5 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Jones, Andrew (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Transformative Food Systems (TFS) Fellow or instructor permission.
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This experientially-based course will build students’ equity competency – the knowledge, skills and values needed to recognize and address historical, structural inequities that pervade today’s food systems. The goal is to prepare reflective, visionary and strategic food systems leaders who use systems thinking, collaboration, and an ethics of justice.
  • Learning Objectives: 1) Examine diverse strategies for overcoming inequities, health challenges and environmental crises facing food systems across various dimensions, scales, and geographies, 2) Explore diverse career pathways for catalyzing food systems change, and 3) Reflect on how personal identities, values, implicit biases, and leadership styles shape efforts to transform food systems, 4) Practice interpersonal, communication and leadership skills needed for collective action.

NUTR585: Food Service Management

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Ramos, Patti (Residential);
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: Grad status
  • Description: This course examines the principles of food systems management, defing and applying management theories and functions in food and nutrition settings. Human, material and facility management will be discussed. Students gain an understanding of the tools available for managing effective and efficient food and nutrition organizations. Purchasing and inventory techniques will be examined. Using the foodservice systems model as a guide, it shows students how to transform the human, material, facility and operational inputs of the system into outputs of meals, customer satisfaction, employee satisfaction and financial accountability. This course will cover cost control, methods that are specific to managing food service operations, including food waste and theft.

NUTR590: Epigenetics and the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease

  • Graduate level
  • Both Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a first year course for Online students
  • Spring-Summer term(s) for online MPH students; Spring-Summer term(s) for online MS students.
  • 2 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Dolinoy, Dana Jansen, Erica (Online MPH); Dolinoy, Dana Jansen, Erica (Online MS);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: Introduction to Epidemiology, college-level biology, genetics or biochemistry
  • Description: In the first part of the course, we will consider how physical growth and maturation from conception through adolescence predict current and later health risk (i.e. the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease hypothesis, or DOHaD). In the second part of the course, we will learn about one of the potential mechanisms underlying the DOHaD hypothesis, which is that early life experiences affect our epigenome - the collection of molecular markers that control our genes' expression. The last portion of the course will culminate in a project that ties part 1 and 2 together. Specifically, you will design an ideal study that incorporates your acquired knowledge on growth assessment and epigenetic methods.
  • Learning Objectives: 1- Use the DOHaD framework to explain how early environments can predict later disease 2- Apply life stage-specific tools to assess growth and development 3- Use nutritional epidemiology perspectives to interpret DOHaD findings 4- Design studies to analyze the role of nutrition in altering growth and development during sensitive periods 5- Define key epigenetic mechanisms and biological phenomena 6- Examine how dietary and environmental factors influence epigenetic mechanisms to affect health status 7 Critically assess epigenetic research in the primary literature 8 Explain the complexity of incorporating epigenetics into population health 9 Articulate potential ethical, policy, and risk assessment ramifications
Concentration Competencies that NUTR590 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
Population and Health Sciences MPH Estimate population health indicators from high quality data resources from diverse sources PUBHLTH515, EPID643, NUTR590, BIOSTAT592, BIOSTAT501

NUTR591: Foundations of Maternal and Child Nutrition I

  • Graduate level
  • Both Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a first year course for Online students
  • Spring-Summer term(s) for online MPH students; Spring-Summer term(s) for online MS students.
  • 3 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 3-1 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Olivia (Online MPH); Anderson, Olivia (Online MS);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: College level biology; college level chemistry or biochemistry
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: As an expert in maternal and child nutrition, you will be able to advocate for, communicate and apply your knowledge about nutritional requirements that support individual- and population-level maternal and child health. You will examine the consequences of malnutrition at critical life stages and major interventions implemented in the US to address these consequences. We will apply our knowledge about social determinants of health in regard to meeting maternal and child nutritional requirements. Finally, we will explore the significance of nutrient status during the preconception life stage to prepare you for Maternal and Child Nutrition II.
  • Learning Objectives: -Identify the macro- and micronutrients critical for normal human growth and development -Outline the dietary guidelines in the US -Understand the biological basis of general nutrient requirements during pre-conception, pregnancy, lactation, infancy and childhood -Analyze the health consequences of malnutrition at critical life stages -Examine socioeconomic and cultural barriers to meeting nutrient needs -Investigate the impact of environmental exposures on maternal and child health -Discuss major nutritional interventions implemented in the United States -Communicate evidenced-based nutritional information to a targeted audience -Analyze nutrient status in regard to reproductive health at the preconception life-stage

NUTR592: Foundations of Maternal and Child Nutrition II

  • Graduate level
  • Both Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a first year course for Online students
  • Fall term(s) for online MPH students; Fall term(s) for online MS students.
  • 3 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 3 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Cole, Suzanne (Online MPH); Cole, Suzanne (Online MS);
  • Prerequisites: NUTR591
  • Advisory Prerequisites: College biology, biochemistry, or physiology
  • Description: Adequate nutrition during pregnancy, lactation, and childhood is essential for healthy human growth and development. In this course, you will learn how the biological processes of pregnancy, lactation, and early childhood influence nutrient metabolism and nutrient requirements. We will examine the scientific basis for nutrient recommendations as well as factors that influence maternal and child nutritional status. We will consider evidence-based maternal interventions as well as policies that support healthy maternal and child outcomes. This course will also explore topics such as the bioactivity of human milk and the infant microbiome. Throughout the course, you will have the opportunity to integrate knowledge and apply methods and tools that aim to improve maternal and child nutrition.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Explain the significance of energy and nutrients in meeting the dynamic metabolic needs during pregnancy, lactation, and early childhood 2. Describe how nutrient metabolism is impacted by the biological states of pregnancy, lactation, and early childhood 3. Identify dietary and non-dietary factors that influence maternal and child nutritional status 4. Use dietary planning methods and tools to develop a nutritionally adequate diet 5. Explain the importance of scientific evidence in promoting maternal and child nutrition 6. Critically review nutrition-related interventions and policies that target women or children 7. Advocate for community interventions or policies that improve maternal and child nutrition

NUTR593: Food Security, Policy, and Programs

  • Graduate level
  • Residential and Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Fall term(s) for residential students; Fall term(s) for online MPH students; Fall term(s) for online MS students.
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students; 3 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 3 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Hazzard, Vivienne (Residential); Hazzard, Vivienne (Online MPH); Hazzard, Vivienne (Online MS);
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH511
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course is a critical exploration of the health issues related to domestic food security, food policy, and food programs, with a focus on maternal and child health. We will examine the array of negative health outcomes associated with food insecurity, discuss potential mechanisms underlying these associations, how food policy is made, the intersection of food policy with public health nutrition, and the influence of federal food assistance programs on diet-related outcomes for children and families.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Describe the terminology and measurement of food insecurity 2. Understand families’ lived experiences of food insecurity 3. Articulate the process for creating federal food policy and national dietary guidelines 4. Participate in the policy process through public comment 5. Identify the primary federal food assistance programs that serve the MCH population and their recent policy changes 6. Critically evaluate research on food security and food policy 7. Develop strong written and verbal communication skills

NUTR594: Molecular Nutrition

  • Graduate level
  • Both Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Fall term(s) for online MPH students; Fall term(s) for online MS students.
  • 3 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 3 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Bridges, Dave (Online MPH); Bridges, Dave (Online MS);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: Undergraduate biology, chemistry and physiology
  • Description: Individual food decisions can have profound impacts on our health. Here, you will learn about the molecular components of food, and how we digest, absorb, transport, and use them in our bodies. We will then use this information to understand how individuals differ in terms of how foods affect them.
  • Learning Objectives: Evaluate foods based on the micro- and macronutrients contained within them Apply knowledge of metabolic, transport, and regulatory mechanisms to predict physiological changes associated with variation in humans.

NUTR595: Nutrition And Genetic Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Both Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for online MPH students; term(s) for online MS students.
  • 3 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 3 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward (Online MPH); Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward (Online MS);
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 501 or 521 and PUBHLTH 512
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course familiarizes students with general methods and principles of nutrition and genetic epidemiology. In this course, students learn about methods to collect nutritional and genetic information at the population level, and how to apply methods of nutritional and genetic epidemiology to examine the relationship of diet, genes, and disease.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Explain different methods to collect nutrition data 2. Assess strengths and weaknesses of different methods to collect nutrition data in epidemiological studies 3. Apply analytic tools to adjust for energy intake on nutritional epidemiology studies 4. Determine association of dietary factors with health outcomes 5. Explain types of genetic variation at the population level 6. Calculate allele frequencies at the population level 7. Understand factors affecting allele frequencies 8. Identify publicly available data for studies of genetic epidemiology 9. Calculate measures of association of genetic factors and health outcomes 10. Describe types of gene-diet interaction 11. Analyze datasets to estimate measures of gene-diet interaction 12. Interpret results of gene-diet interaction analysis 13. Summarize results of gene-diet interaction analysis to identify at-risk subjects

NUTR596: Precision Nutrition Within A Lifecourse Epidemiological Framework

  • Graduate level
  • Both Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for online MPH students; Winter term(s) for online MS students.
  • 3 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 3 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Perng, Wei (Online MPH); Perng, Wei (Online MS);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: NUTR595
  • Description: Metabolic heterogeneity, or differences in metabolism, drives need for precision nutrition. In this course, we will learn about sources of metabolic heterogeneity and ways in which precision nutrition addresses this phenomenon across the life course.
  • Learning Objectives: Define precision nutrition and explain how precision/personalized nutrition differs from the traditional field of nutrition and dietary assessment • Identify biological, behavioral, and environmental sources of metabolic heterogeneity • Apply lifecourse epidemiology conceptual frameworks to the study of metabolic heterogeneity

NUTR597: Precision Nutrition: Translating Science To Practice

  • Graduate level
  • Both Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for online MPH students; Winter term(s) for online MS students.
  • 2 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Aaronson, Susan Ball, Sarah (Online MPH); Aaronson, Susan Ball, Sarah (Online MS);
  • Prerequisites: NUTR 594, NUTR 595, NUTR 596
  • Description: In this novel course, students will understand, translate and incorporate the emerging fields of nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics, culinary medicine and the microbiome into personalized nutrition practice grounded in public health principles.
  • Learning Objectives: 1 Demonstrate literacy comprehension regarding the emerging science of precision nutrition. 2 Understand the role public health principles play in a precision nutrition approach 3 Describe the role of the microbiome and genetics in chronic disease prevention and treatment 4 Summarize the large precision nutrition randomized controlled trials 5 Explain how food and nutrients impact gene expression and the microbiome 6 Demonstrate how to incorporate culinary genomics into practice 7 Evaluate how genetics and the microbiome are currently being used in practice. 8 Translate current public health nutrition guidelines and recommendations to the individual using genetic and microbiome data. 9 Implement culinary techniques (food and nutrients?) to optimize health. 10 Determine if the current evidence supports the use of precision nutrition in practice and how it can be effectively applied
  • This course is cross-listed with .
Concentration Competencies that NUTR597 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
Population and Health Sciences MPH Recommend evidence-based interventions that engage broad and diverse community stakeholders for population health improvement PUBHLTH515, EPID591, NUTR597, PUBHLTH511

NUTR600: Professional Development in the Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Olivia (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status, Completion of approved internship, research or practical experience
  • Description: This is a capstone course for Nutritional Sciences Master of Public Health students as they transition from a novice to an expert from the first to second year of the degree program. In this course, students will apply the knowledge learned from the curriculum and field experience to real-life applications.
Concentration Competencies that NUTR600 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR MPH Demonstrate leadership skills that contribute to professional development and innovation in the field of nutrition NUTR600

NUTR610: Evolutionary Nutrition: Implications for Human Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: NUTR 630 and NUTR 631
  • Description: Dietary and cultural shifts/innovations (for example, cooking, domestication of plants and animals) during human origins may have been acted as evolutionary forces shaping the physiology and metabolism as well as the genome of early humans. Exposure to modern diets may result in a mismatch of old adaptations to a new environment, potentially leading to so-called "diseases of civilization" such as hypertension, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. In this course, we will discuss human nutrition from an evolutionary perspective. We will critically review scientific theories (e.g. thrifty gene hypothesis) explaining how mismatch between old adaptations and modern diets affect human health. This evolutionary analysis may shed new light on the epidemics of "diseases of civilization" and may help to inform public health interventions. Students are expected to be very active participants of class discussions.
  • Learning Objectives: After taking this course, students will: -Be able to explain human adaptations to dietary shifts over evolutionary time. -Be able to discuss scientific theories about the mismatch between modern diets and old adaptations. -Understand how an evolutionary perspective may help to explain current population health problems.

NUTR620: Multivariate Analysis of Nutrition Related Studies

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 521 or Instructor consent
  • Description: This course will teach students how to use multivariate statistical techniques to analyze nutritional data. Students will develop skills for the understanding, interpretation, and communication of nutrition-related results on relation to different health outcomes. Students will present a final report with the synthesis and conclusions of all their analyses.
  • Learning Objectives: The student will learn to: -Carry out multivariate analysis to evaluate association between dietary exposures, biomarkers, and health outcomes. -Derive, using principal component analysis, and interpret dietary patterns from dietary intake data. -Summarize, present, and discuss results of nutrition related studies. -Critically read relevant literature.

NUTR621: Eating Disorders Prevention & Treatment

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Sonneville, Kendrin (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: STAT250 or STAT280 or BIOSTATS501/521 (concurrent)
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course is designed to introduce students to eating disorders using a public health framework. Students will be exposed to key concepts and controversies in the eating disorders field.

NUTR622: Weight Bias & Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Sonneville, Kendrin (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTATS521 and/or 501
  • Advisory Prerequisites: NUTR 621
  • Description: This course is designed to introduce students to the pervasiveness and consequences of weight bias. Students will be introduced to weigh-inclusive alternatives (e.g. Health at Every Size) to weight-normative approaches common in public health and health care and will examine issues such as size diversity through a social justice lens.
  • Learning Objectives: Discuss the science of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention in population health, including health promotion, screening, etc. Explain behavioral and psychological factors that affect a population's health

NUTR624: Nutritional Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Baylin, Ana (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: EPID 503 or 600 or EPID 601 or PUBHLTH512; (C- or better)] and [BIOSTAT 501 or 521; (C- or better)]
  • Description: This course is designed for Master and PhD students in the Department of Nutritional Sciences who are interested in conducting or better interpreting epidemiologic studies on nutrition and disease. The course will review methodological issues involved in the design, conduct, analysis and interpretation of studies investigating the relationship between diet and disease.
Concentration Competencies that NUTR624 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR Nutritional Epidemiology PhD Assess the primary strengths and weaknesses of different methods to collect nutrition information at the population level, including sources of error and approaches to reduce error NUTR624
NUTR Nutritional Epidemiology PhD Apply methods of nutritional epidemiology for the evaluation of diet/disease relationships NUTR624
NUTR Nutritional Interventions PhD Identify the primary strengths and weaknesses of the different methods that can be used to collect nutrition information NUTR624

NUTR625: Nutrition and the Immune Response

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Mancuso, Peter (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: any BIOLOGY course from 100-400
  • Description: Food and nutritional status have a profound influence on immune function. Food and nutritional status can maintain immune homeostasis, contribute to immune suppression, enhance chronic inflammation, or provoke an allergic response.The course consists of lectures on basic principles of immunology and presentations and discussion of peer-reviewed literature.

NUTR626: Controversial topics in the role of nutrition on chronic disease

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Baylin, Ana (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600/503 or equivalent or and BIOSTAT 501/521 or equivalent
  • Description: This public health oriented course will provide students the opportunity to advance their knowledge in nutrition and chronic disease research from a population perspective and help them to better interpret epidemiologic studies on nutrition and chronic disease.
  • This course is cross-listed with EPID 625 in the Epidemiology department.

NUTR630: Principles of Nutritional Science

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Bridges, Dave (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course presents foundational knowledge on nutritional metabolism of macronutrients. The digestion, absorption, transport, utilization and storage of macronutrients in humans are the focus. This course integrates biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrient utilization, interactions and metabolic regulation in humans.
Concentration Competencies that NUTR630 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR MPH Describe physiological functioning of the digestive tract following nutrient intake through application of an anatomical visualization NUTR630
NUTR MPH Explain how macro- and micronutrient intake drive metabolic pathways and physiological function NUTR630, NUTR631
NUTR MS Predict consequences that result from defects in specific metabolic pathways, including vitamin and macronutrient deficiencies or inborn errors of metabolism NUTR630
NUTR Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition PhD Predict the consequences of nutrient deficiencies or excesses based on principles of macronutrient and micronutrient biochemistry NUTR630, NUTR631, Doctoral Qualifying Exam
NUTR Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition PhD Predict how genetic variations in enzymes, nutrient transporters or regulators could affect human health and disease NUTR630, NUTR631, NUTR638, Doctoral Qualifying Exam
NUTR Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition PhD Evaluate the biochemical basis of energy generating and consuming pathways, including their role in energy balance NUTR630
NUTR Nutritional Epidemiology PhD Explain how biochemical nature of different carbohydrates/fats/proteins relates to nutritional quality NUTR630
NUTR Nutritional Interventions PhD Apply knowledge of macronutrients and micronutrients to nutrition policies and programs addressing health of populations NUTR630, NUTR631

NUTR631: Metabolism of Vitamins & Minerals

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Bridges, Dave (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: EHS 630
  • Description: This course provides an in-depth introduction to vitamin and mineral metabolism with particular emphasis on nutrient bioavailability and absorption, transport and tissue accumulation, regulation of nutrient metabolism and homeostasis, and nutrient function. Other topics include the health effects of inadequate and excessive micronutrient intake, methods used to estimate nutrient requirements and establish nutrient intake reference and upper limit levels. The depth of micronutrient metabolism covered in this course will provide a sufficient background for students to better understand the scientific literature of individual micronutrients. The course will consist of lectures on the major metabolic/regulatory topics for each micronutrient as well as discussions of nutrient-related topics from the current scientific literature.
Concentration Competencies that NUTR631 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR MPH Explain how macro- and micronutrient intake drive metabolic pathways and physiological function NUTR630, NUTR631
NUTR MS Deduce how specific micronutrient deficiencies relate to poor health including the mechanism(s) of action NUTR631
NUTR Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition PhD Predict the consequences of nutrient deficiencies or excesses based on principles of macronutrient and micronutrient biochemistry NUTR630, NUTR631, Doctoral Qualifying Exam
NUTR Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition PhD Predict how genetic variations in enzymes, nutrient transporters or regulators could affect human health and disease NUTR630, NUTR631, NUTR638, Doctoral Qualifying Exam
NUTR Nutritional Epidemiology PhD Explain how the biological nature of vitamins and minerals relates to population health NUTR631
NUTR Nutritional Interventions PhD Apply knowledge of macronutrients and micronutrients to nutrition policies and programs addressing health of populations NUTR630, NUTR631

NUTR633: Evaluation of Global Nutrition Programs

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Jones, Andrew (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: At least one foundational course in both biostatistics and epidemiology.
  • Description: This course will provide students with an understanding of the principles of program evaluation with an emphasis on global nutrition programs. The course will create a space for discussion and practice in which knowledge can be applied to current global nutrition issues through research and critical analysis.
Concentration Competencies that NUTR633 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR MPH Develop appropriate designs to rigorously monitor and evaluate nutrition programs and policies in diverse contexts NUTR633, NUTR650, NUTR677
NUTR MPH Apply public health theoretical frameworks and nutrition research evidence to inform public health actions NUTR642, NUTR650, NUTR677, NUTR633

NUTR636: Medical Nutrition Therapy I

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Hudson, Liz (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: EHS 630
  • Description: Medical nutrition therapy and disease pathophysiology taught for malnutrition, starvation, metabolic stress, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, pulmonary and neoplasm. Current controversies are briefly introduced. Clinical nutrition screening, assessment, use of clinical laboratory data, and physical assessment are also introduced.

NUTR637: Medical Nutrition Therapy II

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Hudson, Liz (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: EHS 636
  • Description: Applies nutrition support principles to various clinical disease states. Covers topics such as regulation of fluid and electrolytes in nutrition support, acid-base balance, and other aspects of parenteral nutrition. In addition, the pathophysiology and medical nutrition therapy for diabetes, renal and liver disease is taught.

NUTR639: Pathophysiology of Obesity

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Mancuso, Peter (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: NUTR 630
  • Description: This course provides a framework for understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of obesity. The course content will emphasize the influence of physiologic factors that contribute to overconsumption of food, the pathophysiologic consequences of obesity, and current methods of treatment.
Concentration Competencies that NUTR639 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR MPH Suggest interventions that address the role of the environment, food, and lifestyle choices to enhance wellness in diverse individuals and populations NUTR639
NUTR Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition PhD Articulate potential mechanisms by which specific dietary, behavioral factors, and physical activity contribute to weight gain and loss NUTR639

NUTR640: Nutritional Assessment

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Cole, Suzanne (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: EHS 630, Nutrition Science
  • Description: This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the methods and approaches for conducting nutrition assessment of individuals and populations throughout the lifecycle. The course is structured into three assessment components: dietary, biochemical, and body size and body composition. Main topics include in-depth overview of the assessment methods, strengths and limitations of methodology, evaluation and interpretation of assessment data, sources of measurement errors, validity of assessment methods, and basic analytical approaches used to interpret assessment data.
Concentration Competencies that NUTR640 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR MPH Apply the principles and methods of nutrition assessment to monitor nutritional status and trends, identify at-risk individuals & groups, and investigate diet and disease relationships NUTR640
NUTR MS Apply the principles and methods of nutrition assessment to monitor nutritional status and trends, identify at-risk individuals & groups, and investigate diet and disease relationships NUTR640
NUTR Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition PhD Propose appriopriate nutritional assessment methodologies in a research context NUTR640
NUTR Nutritional Epidemiology PhD Apply the principles and methods of nutrition assessment to monitor nutritional status and trends, identify at-risk individuals, monitor progress of programs, and investigate diet/disease relationships NUTR640

NUTR642: Community Nutrition

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Cole, Suzanne (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: EHS 630
  • Description: This course is a discussion of the principles and programs developed to improve the dietary intake and the nutritional status of individuals and groups within a community. Primary topics covered include: government and nongovernment nutrition-related programs, groups at nutritional risk, nutritional issues/concerns across the lifecycle, and an introduction to developing community-based nutrition intervention programs (needs assessment, intervention, and evaluation). Didactic lectures and guest presentations accompanied with an in-depth needs assessment and intervention project and a community service-learning component will provide students the opportunity to integrate and apply knowledge through a hands-on approach.
Concentration Competencies that NUTR642 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR MPH Apply public health theoretical frameworks and nutrition research evidence to inform public health actions NUTR642, NUTR650, NUTR677, NUTR633
NUTR MPH Explain dietary influences on health outcomes, and identify population-based strategies to improve nutritional health NUTR642, NUTR650, NUTR677

NUTR644: Global Food Systems Policy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Jones, Andrew (Residential);
  • Offered Fall, 2023
  • Last offered Fall, 2020
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: None.
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course will explore the process of developing policies in low- and middle-income countries that are targeted at altering the nature and functioning of food systems. We will assess policy contexts, stakeholders' priorities, the translation of policies into programs, and the impacts of policies on nutrition and health outcomes.
  • Syllabus for NUTR644

NUTR646: Approaches in Nutrition Counseling

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Sonneville, Kendrin (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: NUTR 636: Medical Nutrition Therapy I
  • Description: The aim of this course is to familiarize dietetics students with counseling strategies that can be used for nutrition behavior change. The course will emphasize both the art and the science of nutrition counseling, as well as the practical aspects of implementing counseling for dietary change.

NUTR650: Socio-ecological Approaches to Child and Adolescent Nutrition

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Bauer, Kate (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: graduate student status,graduate student status
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course utilizes a socio-ecological approach to provide a comprehensive introduction to issues and current debates related to public health nutrition among children and adolescents. Throughout the semester, woven through all of these topics, there will be extensive consideration of appropriate research methodologies and critical reading of current scientific literature.
  • Syllabus for NUTR650
Concentration Competencies that NUTR650 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR MPH Develop appropriate designs to rigorously monitor and evaluate nutrition programs and policies in diverse contexts NUTR633, NUTR650, NUTR677
NUTR MPH Apply public health theoretical frameworks and nutrition research evidence to inform public health actions NUTR642, NUTR650, NUTR677, NUTR633
NUTR MPH Explain dietary influences on health outcomes, and identify population-based strategies to improve nutritional health NUTR642, NUTR650, NUTR677
NUTR Nutritional Interventions PhD Demonstrate familiarity of behavioral change theories and conceptual frameworks relevant to nutrition interventions in clinical and/or community contexts NUTR650

NUTR651: Physical Activity and Nutrition

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Mancuso, Peter (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: NUTR 630 KINES 540,,NUTR 630 KINES 540,NUTR 630 KINES 540,,NUTR 630 KINES 540
  • Description: Students will learn about the impact of physical activity on the nutrition requirements in active individuals and special populations with chronic disease. Students will also learn how to use exercise and diet modification for weight loss and maintenance through lectures and hands on activities.
  • This course is cross-listed with KINES 543 in the Kinesiology department.

NUTR657: Nutrition, the Environment, and Cancer

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Colacino, Justin Zick, Suzanna (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 502 or 522 or equivalent; EPID 503 or equivalent; and PHYSIO 502 or equivalent
  • Description: A large amount of research indicates that dietary and environmental factors impact the development and recurrence of various types of cancer. This course will survey both classic and emerging literature relevant to this topic in a structured discussion and journal club format.

NUTR677: Physical Growth and Maturation

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Peterson, Karen (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 501 or 521
  • Description: This course provides a comprehensive overview of the principles and methods to assess human physical growth and maturational tempo from conception through adolescence and among women of reproductive age. The selection, measurement, and interpretation of anthropometric indicators of growth and maturational tempo are discussed in detail. Public health applications are considered, including the use and limitations of reference growth curves; population trends in obesity, maturation, and stature; growth monitoring in the U.S. and in international public health settings and environmental influences on physical growth and maturation. Students will gain technical expertise in basic analysis and interpretation of growth data from population studies.
Concentration Competencies that NUTR677 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR MPH Develop appropriate designs to rigorously monitor and evaluate nutrition programs and policies in diverse contexts NUTR633, NUTR650, NUTR677
NUTR MPH Apply public health theoretical frameworks and nutrition research evidence to inform public health actions NUTR642, NUTR650, NUTR677, NUTR633
NUTR MPH Explain dietary influences on health outcomes, and identify population-based strategies to improve nutritional health NUTR642, NUTR650, NUTR677

NUTR688: Research Topics in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 0.5 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Aaronson, Susan (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course will introduce students to current topics in nutrition research. Students will attend seminars focused on research that will demonstrate the impact of nutrition on human health. Students are encouraged to pose questions to the speaker and write 5-7 bullet points that provide a summary of each presentation.
  • This course is cross-listed with .
Concentration Competencies that NUTR688 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR MS Interpret key findings from advanced nutritional research NUTR688, NUTR698/9
NUTR Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition PhD Describe findings from presentations of novel nutritional research NUTR688
NUTR Nutritional Epidemiology PhD integrate findings of novel nutrition research with existing knowledge of nutritional epidemiology NUTR688
NUTR Nutritional Interventions PhD Integrate findings from presentations of novel nutritional research with existing knowledge of nutritional interventions NUTR688

NUTR697: Readings in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Supervised study/review of a selected topic in nutritional sciences. May be elected more than once for a maximum of six credits.

NUTR698: Research in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-6 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Original research investigation of a special topic in nutritional sciences.

NUTR699: Masters Thesis in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Perm of Thesis Advisor
  • Description: This course shall be elected by students enrolled in Master's degree programs that require a formal written thesis as a condition of program completion. The thesis shall be defended in front of the student's thesis committee. The course grade will reflect the student's accomplishments relative to the thesis and its defense. The course is to be elected only once.

NUTR701: Research Methods in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Hudson, Liz (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course is designed to introduce research methods to 1st year MS and PhD students. Overall, the course will help students engage on their individual research journey. Students should be prepared to discuss research ideas for further development throughout the course. We will discuss the typical format of reported research, including how and why each section is constructed. We will discuss strategies for conducting a review of the literature that clarifies what is known and unknown about their topic. The course will conclude by allowing students to develop their own research proposals, engage in the process of peer review, and present their final proposals to the class.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Develop a framework for understanding nutrition and public health research 2. Critically evaluate nutrition research 3. Formulate a scientific research question and relevant hypotheses for a given topic 4. Conduct a review of the literature 5. Understand the components of a research manuscript and styles of scientific writing 6. Practice the art of peer review and providing constructive feedback 7. Develop the major components of a research proposal

NUTR796: Special Topics in Nutritional Sciences

NUTR802: Professional Development and Technical Writing

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Sonneville, Kendrin (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: EHS801
  • Description: Doctoral students must learn to think critically about their own writing, the writing of their peers, and the process of writing in general. This course will center on peer review, written critiques, and lectures from experts to build the skills necessary to craft a piece of writing with these elements.

NUTR803: Effective Teaching in Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Olivia (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Students will engage in a community of graduate students to explore/prepare for a faculty career, focusing on teaching at a university-level specifically in the public health field. Students will immerse in literature, discussion, and workshops on state-of-the-art pedagogical techniques. Course tangibles include: teaching philosophy statement, course syllabus, and teaching demonstration.
  • This course is cross-listed with PUBHLTH803.

NUTR830: Advanced Topics in Macronutrient Metabolism

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: NUTR630 and NUTR631
  • Description: This course is an elective designed for research-based molecular nutrition students. It will introduce topics and methods in biochemical and molecular nutrition research. We will use group discussions and individual projects to enhance critical analysis skills and learn how to follow in the rapidly advancing field of molecular nutrition.
  • Learning Objectives: * Develop high critical thinking skills such as synthesis and projecting future studies within recent macromolecular nutrition topics. * Learn how to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of nutrition research. * Gain fluency in the molecular nutrition literature including how to assess the validity of claims. * Familiarize yourself with the process of developing research grant proposals and reviews. * Identify limitations in research articles, and how this affects the rigor and universality of their conclusions. * Interpret and evaluate modern molecular nutrition methods based on their implementation and appropriate controls. * Evaluate emerging themes in macromolecular nutrition that affect individual responses to the diet.
Concentration Competencies that NUTR830 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition PhD Create a rigorous study design to test a research question based on a critical evaluation of prior literature NUTR990, NUTR995, NUTR830

NUTR869: Innovations in Nutrition Research

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Jansen, Erica Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Doctoral, MPH and MS student with demonstrated interest in Nutritional Sciences research (with permission),Doctoral, MPH and MS student with demonstrated interest in Nutritional Sciences research (with permission)
  • Description: The course will include: -integrative discussions of dissertation research projects -presentations of research findings -in-depth literature reviews and critiques -manuscript reviews in Nutritional Sciences
Concentration Competencies that NUTR869 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition PhD Disseminate rigorous research findings through clear, persuasive written and oral communication to both peers and non-technical audiences NUTR869
NUTR Nutritional Interventions PhD Disseminate rigorous research findings through clear, persuasive written and oral communication to both peers and non-technical audiences NUTR869

NUTR899: Advanced Research in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-6 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Must be a PhD student in Nutritional Sciences
  • Description: Original investigations of a specific research topic in Nutritional Sciences. Designed for doctoral students performing research prior to passing their qualifying exams. Students will complete two separate rotations with faculty members for a minimum of 1 credit each. This course may be elected more than once.

NUTR990: Dissertation Research/Pre-Candidate

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Nutritional Sciences Doctoral Student
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to status as a candidate.
Concentration Competencies that NUTR990 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition PhD Create a rigorous study design to test a research question based on a critical evaluation of prior literature NUTR990, NUTR995, NUTR830
NUTR Nutritional Interventions PhD Create a rigorous intervention study design to test a research question based on a critical evaluation of prior literature NUTR990, NUTR995, Preliminary Exam

NUTR995: Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Nutritional Sciences Doctoral Student
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student who has been admitted to status as a candidate
Concentration Competencies that NUTR995 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition PhD Create a rigorous study design to test a research question based on a critical evaluation of prior literature NUTR990, NUTR995, NUTR830
NUTR Nutritional Interventions PhD Create a rigorous intervention study design to test a research question based on a critical evaluation of prior literature NUTR990, NUTR995, Preliminary Exam

PUBHLTH511: Nutrition and Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential and Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a first year course for Online students
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students; Fall term(s) for online MPH students; Fall term(s) for online MS students.
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Hudson, Liz Hazzard, Vivienne (Residential); Peterson, Karen Leung, Cindy (Online MPH); Leung, Cindy Peterson, Karen (Online MS);
  • Prerequisites: SPH MPH and SPH MHSA Residential Students Only or By Instructor Permission
  • Description: Introduce MPH students to important topics in nutrition and public health, program planning and program evaluation. PUBHLTH511 is an introductory course to nutrition research and will cover topics, such as healthful diet patterns, methods of dietary assessment, nutritional epidemiology, nutrition through the life cycle, and nutritional needs of diverse populations. This course will have a hybrid style (online & in-class) of instruction.
  • Learning Objectives: Students will be able to: 1) apply nutrition indicators for different public health purposes, including: estimating prevalence, monitoring and surveillance, and investigating diet and disease relationships, identifying at-risk individuals and groups, and evaluating programs; 2) apply public health conceptual frameworks and nutrition research evidence to inform public health actions; 3) use evidence-based knowledge to develop nutrition programs and interventions for diverse populations; and 4) develop appropriate designs to rigorously monitor and evaluate nutrition programs and policies in diverse contexts.
  • This course is required for the school-wide core curriculum
Concentration Competencies that PUBHLTH511 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
Population and Health Sciences MPH Design multisector collaborations that will support all phases of population health improvement (assessment, planning, implementation, evaluation) PUBHLTH515, HBEHED590, HBEHED591, PUBHLTH511
Population and Health Sciences MPH Recommend evidence-based interventions that engage broad and diverse community stakeholders for population health improvement PUBHLTH515, EPID591, NUTR597, PUBHLTH511
Population and Health Sciences MS Demonstrate knowledge of the major issues and current research problems in population health using at least two key disciplines (e.g., biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health, nutritional science). PUBHLTH511, PUBHLTH512, PUBHLTH514, PUBHLTH515
Population and Health Sciences MS Critically evaluate research reports and publications. PUBHLTH511, PUBHLTH511, PUBHLTH515
Population and Health Sciences MS Apply methodological skills needed to plan, conduct, critique and/or research population health issues and solutions. BIOSTAT591, PUBHLTH511, PUBHLTH512, PUBHLTH515, PUBHLTH682, PUBHLTH683