Courses Taught by Linda Chatters

HBEHED623: Racial/ethnic Health Disparities

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Chatters, Linda (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Description: The seminar aims to develop a critical perspective on the origins and drivers of racial health disparities such as disease incidence/prevalence, premature/excessive mortality, higher disease burden, and poorer clinical outcomes. Potentials and limitations of approaches to addressing disparities (e.g., behavioral, community change, and policy) are discussed.
  • Learning Objectives: 1) Understanding and defining health disparities and health inequities and ethical and professional imperatives for addressing them, 2) The nature and form of racial/ethnic health disparities/inequities (acute, chronic, mental and physical) affecting diverse groups in the United States, 3) Understand how U.S. socio-historical racial narratives, policies and events contribute to the development and maintenance of health and social inequities 4) The roles of social, cultural and societal factors (historical events, policy, laws) associated with the development and maintenance of health disparities/inequities, 5) Reviews and critiques of current explanatory models and frameworks (behavioral and lifestyle, cultural and assimilation models, Weathering, structural, social determinants of health, fundamental cause theory, systems perspectives) for understanding health disparities/inequities 6) Factors associated with the development and impact of health disparities across the life course (e.g., cumulative risks/disadvantage, cumulative advantage), 7) Review specific categories of health disparities/inequities within designated racial and ethnic groups in the U.S., 8) Discussion of the type and adequacy of data sources (e.g., use of pan-ethnic categories vs. disaggregation of data representing constituent ethnic groups), 9) Exploring how intersectional perspectives, Critical Race Theory, diminished returns perspectives, and racialization processes, inform discussions of health disparities/inequities and their impact, 10) Discuss individual, interpersonal, community, cultural, and spiritual/religious factors, processes and practices that foster resiliency, enhance well-being and protect health outcomes, 11) Review research and programmatic initiatives focused on accessing and enhancing personal, social, and cultural resources, assets and strengths that reduce/ameliorate health disparities/inequities 12) Review practice evidence for individual, family, community, structural and policy approaches to reducing health disparities and developing health equity.
  • Syllabus for HBEHED623

HBEHED629: Families and Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Chatters, Linda (Residential);
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course will examine families as a primary context for understanding health and health-related behaviors. Major topics include: 1) models and theories of the family, 2) history and current status of family-based practice, 3) the impact of demographic trends and their impact on family structure and functioning, 4) family diversity with respect to social status groups, ethnicity, and culture and their implications for understanding health phenomena, 5) families as the context for socialization to health beliefs and practices, 6) the provision of family-based care, and 7) health profiles of family members and their family roles.
  • This course is cross-listed with HB727 (School of Social Work) in the School of Social Work department.