Courses Taught by Staff

BIOSTAT449: Topics In Biostatistics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Statistics 401 or permission of instructor
  • Description: This course will make use of case studies to discuss problems and applications of biostatistics. Topics will include cohort and case control studies, survival analysis with applications in clinical trials, evaluation of diagnostic tests, and statistical genetics. The course will conclude with a survey of areas of current biostatistical research.
  • This course is cross-listed with Statistics 449 in the Literature, Science and the Arts department.

BIOSTAT610: Readings in Biostatistics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: One of Biostat 503, Biostat 524, Biostat 553 or Biostat 601/Biostat 602
  • Description: Independent study in a special topic under the guidance of a faculty member. May be elected more than once. Enrollment is limited to biostatistics majors.

BIOSTAT630: Statistical Methods in Biological Assay

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Not offered 2021-2022
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 650 and Co-requisite Biostat 651 or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Logic of biological assay; dosage response curves; quantitative and quantal responses; parallel line and slope-ratio assays; simplified estimators; sequential assays; problem of design.

BIOSTAT642: Introduction to Functional MRI

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Not offered 2021-2022
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course presents the basic skills to design and analyze functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments. We start by reviewing the basic Matlab and Unix skills necessary to manipulate image data. Next we introduce the principles of MRI and the nature of the Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) effect, including artifacts that corrupt the BOLD signal. We cover blocked and event-related designs, and how to optimize statistical power of design. We cover subject safety.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT642

BIOSTAT645: Time Series Analysis with Biomedical Applications

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Not offered 2021-2022
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 602, Biostat 650 or Perm. Instr
  • Description: Introduction to statistical time series analysis with an emphasis on frequency domain (spectral) methods and their applications to biomedical problems. Topics include autocorrelation, stationarity, autoregressive and moving average processes, power spectra, periodgrams, spectral estimation, linear filters, complex demodulation, autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models, cross-correlation, cross-spectra, coherence, time and frequency domain linear regression. The methods will be illustrated in applications to various areas of public health and medical research such as environmental health, electrophysiology, and endocrinology.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT645

BIOSTAT664: Special Topics in Biostastics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Not offered 2021-2022
  • Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
  • Description: Master's level seminar designed to provide an extensive review of a number of substantive and methods and skill areas in biostatistics. Readings, discussion, and assignments are organized around issues of mutual interest to faculty and students. Reviews and reports on topics required in the areas selected. May be elected more than once.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT664

BIOSTAT690: Health Applications of Multivariate Analysis

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Not offered 2021-2022
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 650 and Biostat 651 and Math 417 or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Techniques of multivariate analysis related to health and biomedical problems. Emphasis on computational techniques and programs with health examples. Tests of significance for one, two or more populations; general linear model; multivariate analyses of variances and covariances; correlation procedures; principal components and discriminant analyses.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT690

BIOSTAT696: Spatial Statistics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Not offered 2021-2022
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 601, BIOSTAT 602, BIOSTAT 650, BIOSTAT 653
  • Description: This course will introduce the theory and methods of spatial and spatio-temporal statistics. It will present spatial and spatio-temporal statistical models and will discuss methods for inference on spatial processes within a geostatistical and a hierarchical Bayesian framework.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT696

BIOSTAT820: Readings in Biostatistics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Students assigned special topics for literature study under guidance of individual faculty members. May be elected more than once. Enrollment limited to biostatistics majors.

BIOSTAT840: Advanced Topics in Data Analysis

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Not offered 2021-2022
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 650 and Biostat 651
  • Description: Alternate methods of data analysis useful when data do not fulfill unusual assumptions of statistical tests. Using articles from the literature, students learn methods of data analysis more robust than usual methods and how to choose among them. Focuses on comparison of groups, ANOVA and regression.

BIOSTAT845: Advanced Topics in Times Series Analysis

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Not offered 2021-2022
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 645, Stat 531 or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Advanced theory of stationary univariate and multivariate time series. Additional advanced topics such as analysis of non-stationary, non-linear, and/or categorical time series; time-frequency analysis; and statistical methods based on the wavelet transform or related transforms. Application of methods to time series data sets from health research.

BIOSTAT850: Research in Biostatistics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 2-4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Not offered 2021-2022
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Research on selected topics involving the application of statistical methods to health problems. May be elected more than once. Enrollment limited to biostatistics majors.

BIOSTAT851: Linear Statistical Models (Stat 642)

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Not offered 2021-2022
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 602 and Biostat 651 or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Theory of multivariate normal distribution, distribution of quadratic forms, Cochran's theorem, Gauss-Markov theorem, general linear hypothesis, experimental design models, Wishart distribution.

BIOSTAT890: Multivariate Statistical Models (Stat 640)

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Not offered 2021-2022
  • Prerequisites: Math 417 and either Stat 511 or Biostat 602 and Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Derivation of multivariate techniques: multivariate estimation, T, criteria for testing linear hypothesis, test for additional information, testing covariance matrices, factor analysis, growth curves and elementary time series.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT890

BIOSTAT990: Dissertation/Pre-Candidacy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: (1-8 Full term, 1-4 Half term)
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted to status as a candidate.

BIOSTAT995: Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Admission to Doctoral Program(1-8 Full term, 1-4 Half term)
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student who has been admitted to status as a candidate.

EHS697: Readings

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr
  • Description: Supervised study/review of a selected topic in environmental health, occupational health, nutrition and/or toxicology. May be elected more than once for a maximum of six credits.

EHS698: Research

  • Graduate level
  • Both Residential and OJOC
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for OJOC and residential students;
  • 1-6 credit hour(s) for OJOC and residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Original research investigation of a special topic in environmental health, occupational health, nutrition and/or toxicology. May be elected more than once for a maximum of six credits.

EHS699: Master's Thesis

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Perm of Thesis Advisor
  • Description: This course shall be elected by students enrolled in Master's degree programs that require a formal written thesis as a condition of program completion. The thesis shall be defended in front of the student's thesis committee. The course grade will reflect the student's accomplishments relative to the thesis and its defense. The course is to be elected only once.

EHS899: Advanced Research

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-6 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Original investigations of a specific topic in environmental health, occupational health, nutrition and/or toxicology. Designed for doctoral students performing research prior to passing their qualifying exam. May be elected more than once.

EHS990: Dissertation/Pre-Candidacy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to status as candidate.

EHS995: Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students who have been admitted to status as candidate.

EPID299: Independent Research for Undergraduates

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Students do an independent microbiology research project under the supervision of afaculty member in the Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology program.
  • Learning Objectives: Students learn both specific laboratory techniques and in general how to carryout independent research.

EPID399: Independent Research for Undergraduates

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr. and at least Junior status
  • Description: Students do an independent microbiology research project under the supervision of a faculty member in the Hospital & Molecular Epidemiology program.

EPID525: Clinical and Diagnostic Microbiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2020
  • Prerequisites: At least 1 prior microbiology course or permission of the instructor
  • Description: This course describes methods used by clinical and public health microbiologists to detect clinically relevant microorganisms in patient specimens, and how this information is used in patient management. Students will gain an understanding of processes by which microbiology data is generated and its relevance to clinicians and epidemiologists.

EPID565: Research in Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-6 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Offered every year
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Investigation of a selected problem planned and carried out by each student. Pertinent literature, investigational approaches, and progress in the investigations are discussed in seminars. May be taken more than once for up to six credits. Usually taken first for one credit. This is the Capstone Course for Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology Students.

EPID601: Principles and Methods of Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Offered every year
  • Last offered Fall 2020
  • Prerequisites: Previous or concurrent enrollment in Biostat 523 or equiv; Epid 600 or 503 is recommended but not required
  • Description: Epid 601 is a comprehensive course in the basic concepts, principles, and methods of population-based epidemiologic research, which serves as a foundation for subsequent courses in epidemiology, biomedical research, and quantitative methods. Class topics expand on those covered in Epid 600. Emphasis is given to study design, quantitative measures, statistical analysis, data quality, sources of bias, and causal inference. The general approach of this course is both theoretical and quantitative, focusing on the investigation of disease etiology and other causal relations in public health and medicine.
  • Syllabus for EPID601
Concentration Competencies that EPID601 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Industrial Hygiene MS Analyze, interpret, and apply statistical and epidemiological data PUBHLTH512, EPID601, Thesis
EPID Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology MPH Apply appropriate methods for collecting primary and/or secondary occupational and environmental exposure data and health outcomes for original analysis EPID601

EPID604: Applications of Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
  • Description: Application of epidemiological methods and concepts to analysis of data from epidemiological, clinical or laboratory studies. Introduction to independent research and scientific writing under faculty guidance.
  • Syllabus for EPID604

EPID605: Infectious Disease Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Offered every year
  • Last offered Fall 2020
  • Prerequisites: EPID 503 or EPID 600
  • Description: Introduction to disease and transmission characteristics, and the descriptive epidemiology of infectious agents. This course will help students to understand the theoretical basis of pathogen transmission and what factors determine patterns of disease occurrence. Students will learn how to apply this understanding to disease prevention and control.
  • Syllabus for EPID605

EPID624: Readings in Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Review of literature on selected subjects under guidance of individual faculty members and through scheduled seminars at which reports are presented. May be elected more than once.

EPID702: Bayesian Perspectives in Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff Little, Roderick (Residential);
  • Last offered Summer 2016
  • Prerequisites: courses in basic statistics and standard regression
  • Description: This course provides an introduction to Bayesian methods in epidemiology. Topics include: contrasting the Bayesian and classical approaches to hypothesis testing and interval estimation; strengths and weaknesses of the two paradigms, and when they give similar and dissimilar answers; objective and subjective Bayes; calibrated Bayes, a conceptual approach that combines Bayesian and frequentist ideas; computational tools, including Markov Chain Monte Carlo. the Bayesian approach to some important problems in epidemiology: contingency tables, diagnostic testing, comparison of means, regression, hierarchical models, measurement error, and analysis of data from common study designs.

EPID708: Machine Learning for Epidemiologic Analysis in the Era of Big Data

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Last offered Summer 2016
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: Introductory course in statistics as well as courses or working knowledge of basic regressions (linear, logistic, etc.). Having some background in the programming language R preferred.
  • Description: Course focuses on advances in machine learning and its application to causal inference and prediction via Targeted Learning, which allows the use of machine learning algorithms for prediction and estimating so-called causal parameters, such as average treatment effects, optimal treatment regimes, etc. We will discuss implementation via cloud computing.

EPID712: Epidemiology of Oral Diseases and their Role in General Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: Participants in this course will learn about the measurement and epidemiology of oral diseases and their extensive impact on quality of life. The course will illustrate the use of epidemiologic approaches to describe oral manifestations of systemic diseases and systemic manifestations of oral diseases as well as the financial and human costs of dental care. The need for patient-centered, interprofessional collaboration approaches will be discussed. The course will emphasize the evaluation of population and clinical scientific evidence in oral health epidemiology.

EPID719: Quantitative Methods in Genetic Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: EPID 701 or EPID 503 or EPID 600 or EPID 601 AND EPID 709 or BIOSTAT 501 or BIOSTAT 521
  • Description: This course familiarizes students with methods and principles of genetic and epigenetic epidemiology. The course integrates concepts in human genetics, population genetics, epidemiology and biostatistics. The course will emphasize applications of existing methods. Topics to be included are population genetics, gene-environment interaction, genetic and epigenetic association studies, and social epigenomics.

EPID720: Applied Mediation Analysis

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: The course will approach concepts and methods for mediation from the perspective of the counterfactual framework. Mediation analysis quantifies the extent to which the effect of an exposure on some outcome is mediated through a particular intermediate and the extent to which it is direct or through other pathways. Definitions, identification results and statistical techniques related to mediation analysis will be covered. The course will clarify the assumptions required for the estimation of direct and indirect effect and will extend the approach to mediation typically employed in epidemiology and the social sciences to settings with interactions, non-linearities, and time-varying exposures. Prerequisite: Familiarity with regression analysis and potential outcomes.
  • Learning Objectives: 1.To understand the assumptions of a counterfactual frame in formulating mediation analyses questions 2.To identify different types of causal effects (e.g. total, direct, indirect) and their mathematical relations with each other 3.To correctly specify regression models in conducting mediation analyses 2.To master the use of statistical software code to conduct mediation analyses and the interpretation of output

EPID721: Applied Sensitivity Analyses In Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Introductory epidemiology. Introductory biostatistics or introduction to generalized linear models. Working knowledge of a general statistical software like SAS, Stata or R
  • Advisory Prerequisites: An introductory course on causal inference (e.g. EPID 780) is highly recommended
  • Description: This course introduces how to think about and conduct sensitivity analyses for uncontrolled confounding, selection bias and measurement error in epidemiologic studies. The course will demonstrate the intuition behind the separate and combined consequences of these sources of bias on estimating and inferring causal effects. It will provide practical quantitative skills for assessing the sensitivity of analytical results to these biases in order to aid credible causal modeling and inference using empirical epidemiologic studies
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Learn to articulate the different of impact of uncontrolled confounding, selection bias and measurement error separately and in combination. 2. Learn to depict visually these sources of bias and understand their impact using causal diagrams. 3. Learn to conduct quantitative bias analyses including multiple-bias modeling. 4. Learn to reason about and obtain bias parameters for sensitivity analyses. 5. Learn to apply and interpret probabilistic sensitivity analyses in epidemiologic studies.

EPID722: Medical Product Epidemiology and Global Regulation

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course addresses the use and effects of medical products -These products are regulated worldwide. These regulatory requirements have stimulated the need for data and varied studies on very large populations to establish the safety of the products and the concomitant conditions that help determine their safety and effectiveness.

EPID743: Applied Linear Regression

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Last offered Summer 2016
  • Prerequisites: Intro Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Perm. Instr
  • Description: This course is an introduction to the most powerful analysis technique in statistics: linear regression. This course discusses the applications of linear regression models to medical research and public health data. We will focus on the two major goals of linear models: (1) Explanation: the estimation of associations, and (2) Prediction: the use of models to predict subject outcomes, as with diagnostic tests. Specific topics include graphical exploratory data analysis, assumptions behind simple and multiple linear regression, use of categorical explanatory variables, identification of appropriate transformations of explanatory and/or outcome variables, assessment of predictor/outcome associations through hypothesis testing, identification of confounding and effect modification, assessment of model fit, and model selection techniques.

EPID762: Analysis of Complex Sample Survey Data

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: . A first course in survey sampling or research methods and a basic understanding of sampling concepts such as stratification, cluster sampling and weighting is required.
  • Description: This course will present a practical overview of modern techniques for analyzing survey data in a way that accounts for the complex features of the sample design that gave rise to the sample of units that was ultimately surveyed

EPID780: Applied Epidemiologic Analysis For Causal Inference

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: students should have at least one basic epidemiology course with a working knowledge of regression and other standard statistical methodology common in basic epidemiological analysis.
  • Advisory Prerequisites: EPID 701 or EPID 503 or EPID 600 or EPID 601 AND EPID 709 or BIOSTAT 501 or BIOSTAT 521
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course focuses on concepts and application of potential outcomes for the estimation of causal parameters in epidemiologic research. Emphasis is on understanding the causal quantities, specifying the corresponding models, and interpreting the resulting estimates. Some simple code in Stata will be shown throughout, but no specific software background is required.

EPID793: Complex Systems Modeling for Public Health Research

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Last offered Summer 2016
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course will provide an introduction to two major complex systems science modeling techniques with wide applicability to public health. We will cover an introductory overview of complex systems modeling in general, and systems dynamics and agent-based modeling in particular. We will discuss model applications, best practices, and more advanced practical topics such as team-building, computation, funding, and publication. We will provide extensive hands-on lab experience during each section of the course. At the completion of the course the student will be able to explain current and potential future roles of complex systems science in public health, describe the respective advantages/disadvantages of each method covered, and will be expected to produce a draft proposal for applying one of the two system science methods to a particular problem. Students will become informed consumers of complex systems research, will be prepared to actively participate in interdisciplinary teams using the modeling techniques, and will be well positioned to incorporate systems science methods into their own research. Prerequisite: Relevant background in public health.

EPID799: Qualitative Methods for Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Last offered Summer 2016
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course provides an overview of qualitative research methods that can complement and enhance epidemiologic studies. It is useful for epidemiologists interested in understanding the social, cultural and behavioral aspects of public health issues within communities. Students will learn how to integrate qualitative methods into epidemiology research and how to select appropriate qualitative methods. Sessions will cover: principles of qualitative research, study design, participant recruitment, data collection methods (interviews, group discussion, and observation), writing and presenting qualitative research and assessing research quality. The course uses participatory learning activities to build core skills. The course is valuable for public health professionals, staff at government and non-government agencies focusing on health and disease, graduate students and researchers. Skills learnt in this course will be valuable for conducting epidemiology research and evaluating qualitative research components in funding proposals, projects and publications.

EPID891: Advanced Readings in Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Students will review assigned readings on the epidemiology or natural history of specific infections or chronic diseases or on host or environmental factors associated with disease, or on epidemiological methods and their application. May be elected more than once

EPID990: Dissertation Research/Pre-Candidate

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: For students who have NOT reached candidacy yet.

EPID995: Dissertation Research/Candidate

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student who has been admitted to status as a candidate

HBEHED578: Practical Projects

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Practical projects in the application of theory and principles of Health Behavior and Health Education to individual and community-based public health settings. Course requirements include an approved practical project related to Health Behavior and Health Education in consultation with a faculty advisor. THE EXPERIENCE IS REPORTED IN AN INTEGRATIVE PAPER DEMONSTRATING THE SCIENTIFIC APPLICATION OF HBHE THEORIES AND PRINCIPLES TO THE PRACTICAL PROJECT. May be elected more than once. Enrollment limited to Health Behavior and Health Education majors with at least two full terms of prior registration.

HBEHED625: Research in Health Behavior

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Inst.
  • Description: Individual work on a problem in the area of health behavior relevant to program effectiveness in public health, under the tutorial guidance of an appropriate staff member. Regular conferences are arranged to discuss research designs, proposed problem solutions, methods for data collection and analysis. The investigation is reported in a paper, which may be submitted for publication. May be elected more than once.

HBEHED644: Readings in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-6 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Review of literature on selected topics in health behavior, health education or related areas under guidance of faculty member. Critical analysis; written and oral reports. May be taken more than once for a total not to exceed 6 credit hours.

HBEHED900: Research in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 2-6 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Research work undertaken by doctoral students in collaboration with faculty advisers, including participation in on-going departmental research activities. Open only to doctoral students in Health Behavior and Health Education. May be elected more than once.

HBEHED990: Dissertation/Pre-Candidate

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Half Term (IIIA or IIIB, 1-4 credits) Election for dissertation work by doctoral students in Health Behavior and Health Education who are not yet admitted to status as a candidate.

HBEHED995: Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Half Term (IIIA or IIIB, 1-4 credits) Election for dissertation work by doctoral students admitted to status as candidate.

HMP630: Business of Biology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • This course is cross-listed with BA 518 in the Business Administration department.

HMP648: Evaluation & Research Methods for Health informatics and Learning Systems

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff Friedman, Charles (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course provides a foundational introduction to empirical methods, both quantitative and qualitative, that are applicable to health informatics and learning health systems, and that support both evaluation and research studies.
  • This course is cross-listed with HMP 648 in the LHS660/SI648 department.

HMP676: Introduction to Health Informatics

  • Graduate level
  • Executive Masters
  • Winter term(s) for Executive Masters students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for Executive Masters students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Executive Masters);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Health informatics applies to a wide range of health-related application domains a set of methods to create and study information resources intended to improve individual to population health. The course explores the domains of clinical informatics, consumer health informatics, and public health informatics.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Describe challenges currently faced by individuals seeking to improve health using information resources in each of four application domains presented in the course, Clinical, Consumer Health, Public Health, and Biomedical Research. 2. Articulate what is required to develop and deploy health information resources that are truly assistive and helpful for their direct and indirect users, including the phases of developing proposals, developing implementations, and managing operations along with the necessary organizational change management methods. 3. Explain how and why the key methods, such as standards development, natural language processing, image processing, etc., used in health informatics are essential to creating information resources that have the potential to improve health. 4. Describe the components of a computing system’s architecture and how those components support the storage, manipulation, transformation, and use of health data. 5. Effectively link or connect the four concepts of infrastructure, health information exchange, interoperability, and standards in a manner that helps explain how these concepts interrelate to enable potentially improved health information resources. 6. Read and assess health informatics literature critically. 7. Assess key stakeholders and describe the implications of health informatics adoption for each stakeholder. 8. Be able to concisely explain confusing or challenging health informatics concepts (including policies, evaluation methods, and technical approaches) through your own writing and be able to argue for or against others’ positions about health informatics topics in your own words. 9. Describe, with depth of understanding and in detail, what health informatics is and is not, or what health informatics entails and does not entail, for an expert audience and also for an audience unfamiliar with the field.
  • Syllabus for HMP676

HMP680: Special Topics in Health Management and Policy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: Lecture, seminars and readings selected on a current or emerging topic or theme in health, management and policy. The specific material and format will vary by semester and instructor.

HMP681: Special Topics in Health Management and Policy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Dotson, Ebbin Creary, Melissa Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Lecture, seminars and readings selected on a current or emerging topic or theme in health, management and policy. The specific material and format will vary by semester and instructor.
  • Learning Objectives: Will vary by topic and instructor.

HMP690: Readings in Health Management and Policy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status and Perm Instr
  • Description: Directed readings or research on selected topics and problems relevant to health management and policy. May be elected more than once.

HMP815: Readings in Medical Care

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Perm Instr
  • Description: Directed readings in special areas. May be elected more than once. Primarily for doctoral students in Health Services Organization and Policy.

HMP833: Research Topics in Sociology and Health Care Organization

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: HMP doctoral students or P.I.
  • Description: HSOP Program requirements. A topic in sociology and health care organization-policy is selected each term for detailed critical, theoretical, and methodological analysis leading to development, in class, of propositions aimed at advancing scientific status of the area of inquiry. Analysis and development of content follows logic of the research paradigm. Required of students with a sociology cognate in the doctoral program in Health Services Organization and Policy

HMP835: Research Practicum

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 3-6 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: HMP 809, Perm Instr
  • Description: The purpose of this course is to allow each student, early in his or her doctoral career, to gain experience in the actual performance of health services research. The experience will enable students to build sound research skills and to gain knowledge of the nature of inquiry in their discipline as well as in the field of health services research. Each student in the HSOP program is expected to elect a total of 6 credits in HMP 835.
Concentration Competencies that HMP835 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
HMP Health Services Organization and Policy PhD Critically evaluate the prior literature in health services organization and policy, including motivation, theory, data quality, methods, results, conclusions, and policy recommendations HMP803-806, HMP802, HMP835
HMP Health Services Organization and Policy PhD Develop research questions grounded in theory to expand knowledge about health services organization and policy HMP803-806, HMP802, HMP835
HMP Health Services Organization and Policy PhD Create a rigorous study design to test the research questions posed and to understand the strengths and limitations of that study design HMP826, HMP809, HMP835, HMP809
HMP Health Services Organization and Policy PhD Apply advanced quantitative and/or qualitative methods appropriate for health services organization and policy research appropriately in one's own research HMP826, HMP835
HMP Health Services Organization and Policy PhD Disseminate rigorous research findings through clear, persuasive written and oral communication to both peers and non-technical audiences. HMP826, HMP835

HMP990: Dissertation/Precandidates

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to status as candidate.

HMP995: Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students admitted as candidates

NUTR578: Practical Projects

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Practical Projects is the application of theory and principles of Nutritional Sciences to individual community-based public health settings. Course requirements include an approved practical project related to Nutritional Sciences in consultation with a faculty advisor. The experience is documented in an integrative paper demonstrating the scientific application of NS theories and principles to the practical project. May be elected more than once. Enrollment is limited to NS students with at least two full terms completed prior to registration.

NUTR697: Readings in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Supervised study/review of a selected topic in nutritional sciences. May be elected more than once for a maximum of six credits.

NUTR698: Research in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-6 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Original research investigation of a special topic in nutritional sciences.

NUTR699: Masters Thesis in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Perm of Thesis Advisor
  • Description: This course shall be elected by students enrolled in Master's degree programs that require a formal written thesis as a condition of program completion. The thesis shall be defended in front of the student's thesis committee. The course grade will reflect the student's accomplishments relative to the thesis and its defense. The course is to be elected only once.

NUTR796: Special Topics in Nutritional Sciences

NUTR899: Advanced Research in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-6 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Must be a PhD student in Nutritional Sciences
  • Description: Original investigations of a specific research topic in Nutritional Sciences. Designed for doctoral students performing research prior to passing their qualifying exams. Students will complete two separate rotations with faculty members for a minimum of 1 credit each. This course may be elected more than once.

NUTR990: Dissertation Research/Pre-Candidate

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Nutritional Sciences Doctoral Student
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to status as a candidate.
Concentration Competencies that NUTR990 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition PhD Create a rigorous study design to test a research question based on a critical evaluation of prior literature NUTR990, NUTR995, NUTR830
NUTR Nutritional Interventions PhD Create a rigorous intervention study design to test a research question based on a critical evaluation of prior literature NUTR990, NUTR995, Preliminary Exam

NUTR995: Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Nutritional Sciences Doctoral Student
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student who has been admitted to status as a candidate
Concentration Competencies that NUTR995 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition PhD Create a rigorous study design to test a research question based on a critical evaluation of prior literature NUTR990, NUTR995, NUTR830
NUTR Nutritional Interventions PhD Create a rigorous intervention study design to test a research question based on a critical evaluation of prior literature NUTR990, NUTR995, Preliminary Exam

PUBHLTH477: Readings in Public Health

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Review of literature or directed readings on selected topic related to one or more areas of public health.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of the term, students should be able to find and appropriately interpret and critically evaluate the findings in peer-reviewed scientific literature.

PUBHLTH478: Practical Projects in Public Health

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Practical projects allows undergraduate students to explore community-based public health settings. Project must be related to public health practice and developed in consultation with a faculty advisor. Students will write an integrative paper analyzing the organization's role in the public health system and critically reflecting on their experience.
  • Learning Objectives: As part of this course students will consider the following concepts: 1. Health promotion at a population level 2. Community dynamics and the cultural context in which public health professionals work 3. Organizational structure and dynamics, including the organization's role in the public health system 4. How to operate professionally in a public health organization (including but not limited to: personal work ethic, professionalism, teamwork, and leadership)

PUBHLTH479: Independent Research in Public Health

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Students conduct independent research on a specific public health topic under the supervision of a public health faculty member.
  • Learning Objectives: After completing this course, students will: 1. Understand how to form a research question; 2. Be able to identify relevant literature or data sources to address a research question; 3. Better understand the role of data in understanding public health problems.

PUBHLTH615: Public Health in Action: National

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: An intensive course to prepare students for a culminating week-long practice-based experience designed to address existing and emerging public health priorities as defined by the respective communities and their academic partners. Students will be engaged directly with communities and exposed to the contextual, cultural, political and economic factors impacting health.

PUBHLTH616: Public Health in Action: International

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Permission by Instructor
  • Description: An intensive course to prepare students for a culminating week-long international practice-based experience designed to address existing and emerging public health priorities as defined by the respective communities and their academic partners. Students will be engaged directly and exposed to the contextual, cultural, political and economic factors impacting health.

PUBHLTH741: Interdisciplinary Problem Solving

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Advisory Prerequisites: graduate standing
  • Description: "Interdisciplinary Problem Solving" is a course offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). Through a team-based, experiential, and interdisciplinary learning model, small groups of U-M graduate and professional students work with faculty to explore and offer solutions to emerging, complex problems.
  • Learning Objectives: Will vary term to term
  • This course is cross-listed with LAW741/PUBPOL710/SW741 in the Law School, Public Policy, Social Work department.

PUBHLTH796: Special Topics in Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-5 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course will be used by faculty members to teach special or emerging topics related to Public Health. The specific material and format will vary by semester and instructor.
  • Learning Objectives: Will vary by topic and instructor.