Courses Taught by Eduardo Villamor

EPID600: Introduction to Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall term(s) for residential students;
  • 4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Villamor, Eduardo (Residential);
  • Offered Every Fall
  • Last offered Fall 2021
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 503, 553 or another graduate course in basic statistics, which may be taken concurrently with EPID 600
  • Description: This course provides students with the foundations of epidemiologic theory and practice. The course will cover conceptual and practical issues around the design, conduct, and analysis of epidemiologic research and the interpretation of epidemiologic data. The course format includes lectures and discussions of written exercises.
Concentration Competencies that EPID600 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EPID General Epidemiology MPH Describe population patterns of health-related risk factors and health-related outcomes in terms of person, place, and time EPID600, EPID602
EPID General Epidemiology MPH Compare the relative strengths and weaknesses of common epidemiologic study designs (e.g., cross-sectional, cohort, case-control, randomized experiments) EPID600, EPID602
EPID General Epidemiology MPH Interpret the impact of bias, confounding, and effect modification on causal inference in epidemiologic research EPID600, EPID602
EPID General Epidemiology MPH Critically evaluate epidemiological findings from published research studies EPID600
EPID Clinical Research-Epidemiology MS Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of study designs (e.g., cross-sectional, cohort, case-control, randomized experiments) and the appropriate measure of association for a given study design EPID600
EPID Clinical Research-Epidemiology MS Describe the causes of random and non-random error in research studies, including information bias, selection bias, and confounding EPID600

EPID673: Epidemiology of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Villamor, Eduardo (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 521 and EPID 600
  • Description: This course will survey both classic and emerging literature describing the DOHaD paradigm from an epidemiological perspective. The course will have a structured discussion format.
  • Learning Objectives: Through analysis and discussion of research papers in the field, students will be able to: 1) Identify sources of bias in DOHaD research and anticipate their potential effects on estimates of association; 2) Weight evidence on DOHaD according to the relative methodological strength of epidemiological reports; 3) Distinguish strengths and limitations of family studies and randomized trials in DOHaD epidemiology; 4) Link indicators used in epidemiological studies with the underlying biological processes they intend to measure; 5) Integrate evidence from different sources into conceptual frames on DOHaD topics; 6) Understand different strategies for analysis of epidemiological data in DOHaD research. In addition, this course will cover the following learning objective from the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH): LO3. Explain the role of quantitative and qualitative methods and sciences in describing and assessing a population's health.

EPID707: Nutritional Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Villamor, Eduardo (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: EPID 701 or EPID 503 or EPID 600 or EPID 601 AND EPID 709 or BIOSTAT 501 or BIOSTAT 521
  • Description: This course focuses on the design, analysis, and interpretation of epidemiologic studies addressing diet and health. The course will provide quantitative practical skills to deal with methodological issues around dietary assessment methods, sources of variation in the diet, energy intake, measurement error, anthropometry and body composition, and biomarkers of intake.