Winter Courses

BIOSTAT449: Topics In Biostatistics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Statistics 401 or permission of instructor
  • Description: This course will make use of case studies to discuss problems and applications of biostatistics. Topics will include cohort and case control studies, survival analysis with applications in clinical trials, evaluation of diagnostic tests, and statistical genetics. The course will conclude with a survey of areas of current biostatistical research.
  • This course is cross-listed with Statistics 449 in the Literature, Science and the Arts department.

BIOSTAT512: Analyzing Longitudinal and Clustered Data Using Statistical Software

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Welch, Kathy Plegue, Missy (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 501 or 521
  • Description: Longitudinal data sets occur often in a Public Health setting. This course will introduce students to methods for analyzing both clustered and longitudinal data using the statistical software packages SAS and Stata. Models for both continuous and discrete (e.g., binary, count) outcomes will be discussed and illustrated. The course will have one session of lecture and one session of lab per week. The course will be driven primarily by using both software packages to analyze real data sets.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT512

BIOSTAT522: Biostatistical Analysis for Health-Related Studies

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT521; BIOSTAT501 w/ instructors permission.
  • Description: A second course in applied biostatistical methods and data analysis. Concepts of data analysis and experimental design for health-related studies. Emphasis on categorical data analysis, multiple regression, analysis of variance and covariance.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT522
Concentration Competencies that BIOSTAT522 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EPID Clinical Research-Epidemiology MS Analyze research data and interpret these results from a population health or clinical-translational perspective EPID602, BIOSTAT522

BIOSTAT602: Biostatistical Inference

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Han, Peisong Zhang, Min (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 601
  • Description: Fundamental theory that is the basis of inferential statistical procedures. Point and interval estimation, sufficient statistics, hypothesis testing, maximum likelihood estimates, confidence intervals, criteria for estimators, methods of constructing test and estimation procedures.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT602
Concentration Competencies that BIOSTAT602 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
BIOSTAT MPH Derive the theoretical mathematics of statistical inferences BIOSTAT602
BIOSTAT MS Derive the theoretical mathematics of statistical inferences BIOSTAT602

BIOSTAT610: Readings in Biostatistics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: One of Biostat 503, Biostat 524, Biostat 553 or Biostat 601/Biostat 602
  • Description: Independent study in a special topic under the guidance of a faculty member. May be elected more than once. Enrollment is limited to biostatistics majors.

BIOSTAT617: Theory and Methods of Sample Design (Soc 717 and Stat 580 and SurvMeth 617)

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Dempsey, Walter (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Three or more courses in statistics, and preferably a course in methods of survey sampling
  • Description: Theory underlying sample designs and estimation procedures commonly used in survey practice.
  • This course is cross-listed with Stats 580 Soc 717 SurvMeth617 in the Rackham department.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT617

BIOSTAT620: Introduction to Health Data Science

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Song, Peter Xuekun (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 607, BIOSTAT 601, BIOSTAT 650
  • Advisory Prerequisites: No other courses
  • Description: This course offers a systematic introduction to the scope and contents of health data arising from public health and the biomedical sciences. It focuses on rules and techniques for handling health data. Through both regular lectures and guest lectures, this course covers a broad range of health data.
  • Learning Objectives: (a) To understand the foundation and rules for handling big health data. (b) To develop a practical knowledge and understanding of important statistical issues and relevant data analytics for health big data analysis. (c) To learn and master basic software and programming skills for data cleaning and data processing.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT620
Concentration Competencies that BIOSTAT620 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
BIOSTAT Health Data Science MS Understand the roles and principles when a biostatistician conducts the analysis of biomedical or public health data BIOSTAT620
BIOSTAT Health Data Science MS Distinguish among the different measurement scales and data quality, as well as their implications for selection of statistical methods and algorithms to be used based on these distinctions BIOSTAT620

BIOSTAT626: Machine Learning for Health Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Wen, William (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 601,BIOSTAT 602, BIOSTAT 650, BIOSTAT 651, BIOSTAT 607
  • Description: This is a 3-credit course introducing modern machine learning algorithms and data analytics for prediction, classification and data pattern recognition, with an emphasis on their applications in health data sciences.
  • Learning Objectives: (a) To understand the foundation and rules to use machine learning techniques for handling data from the health sciences (b) To develop practical knowledge and understanding of modern machine learning techniques for health big data analysis. (c) To learn and master basic software and programming skills to apply machine learning algorithms in analyzing data arising from the health sciences.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT626

BIOSTAT629: Case Studies in Health Big Data

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Henderson, Nicholas (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 601, BIOSTAT 602, BIOSTAT 650, BIOSTAT 651, BIOSTAT 625, BIOSTAT620
  • Description: Being a project-based course, it integrates all competencies learned in HDSC to provide a culminating research experience. Students will work on two to three health big data projects, through which they learn to identify scientific objectives and analytical strategies and report findings through oral presentation and written documents.
  • Learning Objectives: Students will learn how to identify a scientific goal of the project and to develop analytic strategies. Students will learn to integrate and apply quantitative skills to handle real-world health big data, including data modification and cleaning, data visualization and scalable computing. From presentations, students will improve their communication skills.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT629
Concentration Competencies that BIOSTAT629 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
BIOSTAT Health Data Science MS Apply quantitative techniques commonly used to summarize and display big public health data BIOSTAT629
BIOSTAT Health Data Science MS Apply descriptive and inferential methodologies according to the type of study design or sampling technique for answering a particular public health question BIOSTAT629

BIOSTAT646: High Throughput Molecular Genetic and Epigenetic Data Analysis

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Tsoi, Alex Parker, Stephen CJ (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and STAT400, BIOSTAT522, or BIOSTAT521 or permission of instructor
  • Description: The course will cover statistical methods used to analyze data in experimental molecular biology. The course will primarily cover topics relating to gene expression data analysis, but other types of data such as genome sequence and epigenomics data that is sometimes analyzed in concert with expression data will also be covered.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT646

BIOSTAT651: Theory and Application of Generalized Linear Models

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Baladandayuthapani, Veera He, Kevin (Zhi) (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT601 and BIOSTAT650
  • Description: Introduction to maximum likelihood estimation; exponential family; proportion, count and rate data; generalized linear models; link function; logistic and Poisson regression; estimation; inference; deviance; diagnosis. The course will include application to real data.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT651
Concentration Competencies that BIOSTAT651 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
BIOSTAT MPH Perform generalized linear regression model fitting and diagnosis BIOSTAT651
BIOSTAT MS Perform generalized linear regression model fitting and diagnosis BIOSTAT651
BIOSTAT PhD Perform generalized linear regression model fitting and diagnosis BIOSTAT651

BIOSTAT664: Special Topics in Biostastics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
  • Description: Master's level seminar designed to provide an extensive review of a number of substantive and methods and skill areas in biostatistics. Readings, discussion, and assignments are organized around issues of mutual interest to faculty and students. Reviews and reports on topics required in the areas selected. May be elected more than once.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT664

BIOSTAT665: Statistical Population Genetics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: The first half of the course concentrates on classical population genetics. We introduce topics such as Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, models of selection for populations of infinite size and population subdivision. The second half of the course focuses on coalescent theory, covering migration, changes in population size and recombination. We provide guidelines how these models can be used in to infer population genetic parameters. Finally, some recent results and methods from the population genetic literature are discussed.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT665

BIOSTAT666: Statistical Models and Numerical Methods in Human Genetics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 602 or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Introduction to current statistical methods used in human genetics. Topics will include sampling designs in human genetics, gene frequency estimation, the coalescent method for simulation of DNA sequences, linkage analysis, tests of association, detection of errors in genetic data, and the multi-factorial model. The course will include a simple overview of genetic data and terminology and will proceed with a review of numerical techniques frequently employed in human genetics.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT666

BIOSTAT675: Survival Time Analysis

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Li, Yi (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 602 and Biostat 650
  • Description: Concepts and methods for analyzing survival time data obtained from following individuals until occurrence of an event or their loss to follow-up. Survival time models, clinical life tables, survival distributions, mathematical and graphical methods for evaluating goodness of fit, comparison of treatment groups, regression models, proportional hazards models, censoring mechanisms.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT675

BIOSTAT685: Elements of Nonparametric Statistics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Braun, Thomas (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 602 or STAT 511, and Biostat 650 or Perm. Instr
  • Description: First half covers theory and applications of rank and randomization tests: sampling and randomization models, randomization t-test, Wilcoxon rank sum and signed rank tests, Kruskal-Wallis test, asymptotic result under randomization, relative efficiency; second half covers theory and applications of nonparametric regression: smoothing methods, including kernel estimators, local linear regression, smoothing splines, and regression splines, methods for choosing the smoothing parameter, including unbiased risk estimation and cross-validation, introduction to additive models.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT685

BIOSTAT690: Health Applications of Multivariate Analysis

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 650 and Biostat 651 and Math 417 or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Techniques of multivariate analysis related to health and biomedical problems. Emphasis on computational techniques and programs with health examples. Tests of significance for one, two or more populations; general linear model; multivariate analyses of variances and covariances; correlation procedures; principal components and discriminant analyses.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT690

BIOSTAT695: Analysis of Categorical Data

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Johnson, Timothy (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 602 and Biostat 660
  • Description: Regression models for the analysis of categorical data: logistic, probit and complementary log-log models for binomial random variables; log-linear models for cross-classifications of counts; regression models for Poisson rates; and multinomial response models for both nominal and ordinal responses. Model specification and interpretation are emphasized, and model criticism, model selection, and statistical inference are cast within the framework of likelihood based inference.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT695

BIOSTAT696: Spatial Statistics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 601, BIOSTAT 602, BIOSTAT 650, BIOSTAT 653
  • Description: This course will introduce the theory and methods of spatial and spatio-temporal statistics. It will present spatial and spatio-temporal statistical models and will discuss methods for inference on spatial processes within a geostatistical and a hierarchical Bayesian framework.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT696

BIOSTAT699: Analysis of Biostatistical Investigations

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Mukherjee, Bhramar Morrison, Jean Boonstra, Philip Taylor, Jeremy (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Registration for last term of studies to complete MS or MPH
  • Description: Identifying and solving design and data analysis problems using a wide range of biostatistical methods. Written and oral reports on intermediate and final results of case studies required.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT699
Concentration Competencies that BIOSTAT699 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
BIOSTAT MPH Interpret the results of statistical analysis to public health audience BIOSTAT699
BIOSTAT MPH Write scientific reports based on statistical analysis for effective collaboration with public health related scientists in epidemiology, health management and policy, environmental health sciences, nutrition, and health behavior and health education BIOSTAT699
BIOSTAT MS Interpret the results of statistical analysis in a variety of health-related areas (e.g. public health, medicine, genetics, biology, psychology, economics, management and policy, nursing, or pharmacy) for the broad scientific community BIOSTAT699
BIOSTAT MS Communicate statistical analysis through written scientific reporting for public health, medical, and basic scientists, and/or educated lay audiences BIOSTAT699
BIOSTAT PhD Communicate through written and oral presentation based on statistical analysis for audience from a variety of health-related areas (e.g. public health, medicine, genetics, biology, psychology, nursing, or pharmacy) and for the broad scientific community BIOSTAT699

BIOSTAT800: Seminar in Biostatistics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 0.5 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Morrison, Jean Dempsey, Walter (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Graduate level Biostatistics students only
  • Description: Presentations and discussions of current consulting and research problems. Enrollment limited to biostatistics majors. Students must attend 2/3 of all seminars offered during the semester to receive credit. Maximum credit is 0.5 per semester. No more than 1 credit total allowed. May only be taken a maximum of 2 semesters.

BIOSTAT802: Advanced Inference II

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Han, Peisong (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 601, Biostat 602, and MATH 451 or equivalent
  • Description: This sequence covers advanced topics in probability theory, theory of point estimation, theory of hypothesis testing, and related large sample theory. This sequence replaces STAT 610/611 as biostatistics Ph.D. requirements.
Concentration Competencies that BIOSTAT802 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
BIOSTAT PhD Derive the advanced theoretical mathematics of statistical inferences BIOSTAT802

BIOSTAT815: Advanced Topics in Computational Statistics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Kang, Jian (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT601, BIOSTAT602 and BIOSTAT615 or equiv and proficiency in C++ and R
  • Description: Modern numerical analysis for statisticians. Combination of theory and practical computational examples illustrating the current trends in numerical analysis relevant to probability and statistics. Topics choose from numerical linear algebra, optimization theory, quadrature methods, splines, and Markov chains. Emphasis on newer techniques such as quasi-random methods of integration, the EM algorithm and its variants, and hidden Markov chains. Applications as time permits to areas such as genetic and medical imaging.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT815

BIOSTAT820: Readings in Biostatistics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Students assigned special topics for literature study under guidance of individual faculty members. May be elected more than once. Enrollment limited to biostatistics majors.

BIOSTAT830: Advanced Topics in Biostatistics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Song, Peter Xuekun Li, Gen (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: course/instructor dependent
  • Description: Advanced training in biostatistical methods primarily for doctoral students. Format will include lectures, readings, presentations and discussions in an area of special interest to students and faculty, such as stopping rules and interim analysis in clinical trials, conditional and unconditional inference and ancillarity, or nonparametric regression.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT830

BIOSTAT834: Pedagogical Methods For Biostatistics Courses

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Zawistowski, Matt (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: Biostatistics PhD Candidacy or permission of instructor
  • Description: Biostatistics faculty teach a wide range of courses over diverse student backgrounds, presenting distinct challenges and considerations. This course will develop ideas and skills for building biostatistics courses tailored for specific student groups and course levels. It will prepare PhD students for their first teaching assignment in a faculty position.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Understand how the audience of a specific course impacts course design, content and learning objectives. 2. Implement the concepts of the Guidelines for Assessment and Instruction in Statistics Education (GAISE) College Report into course planning. 3. Become familiar with technology resources to increase active learning techniques (e.g. Poll Everywhere) and improve course management (Canvas). 4. Develop teaching skills that transcend biostatistics: inclusive teaching practices, mentoring and conflict resolution.

BIOSTAT840: Advanced Topics in Data Analysis

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 650 and Biostat 651
  • Description: Alternate methods of data analysis useful when data do not fulfill unusual assumptions of statistical tests. Using articles from the literature, students learn methods of data analysis more robust than usual methods and how to choose among them. Focuses on comparison of groups, ANOVA and regression.

BIOSTAT845: Advanced Topics in Times Series Analysis

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 645, Stat 531 or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Advanced theory of stationary univariate and multivariate time series. Additional advanced topics such as analysis of non-stationary, non-linear, and/or categorical time series; time-frequency analysis; and statistical methods based on the wavelet transform or related transforms. Application of methods to time series data sets from health research.

BIOSTAT850: Research in Biostatistics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 2-4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Research on selected topics involving the application of statistical methods to health problems. May be elected more than once. Enrollment limited to biostatistics majors.

BIOSTAT865: Advanced Statistical Population Genetics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Zoellner, Sebastian (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: It is an exciting time for research in population genetics. Technological advances are making it increasingly possible to obtain large numbers of genotypes from individuals in a population, and theoretical and algorithmic advances are improving the prospects for obtaining detailed inferences about populations and their evolutionary history. To make use of these dramatic advances in the field, it is important to understand the processes that act on populations and affect the properties of the genotypes that will eventually be drawn from these populations. In this course, by learning the mathematical models used in population genetics, students will learn how various population-genetic phenomena influence the properties of genetic variation. Students will also gain an understanding of the statistical methods used for analysis of population-genetic data. The course is split into two major sections. The first section covers classical population genetics, including subjects first introduced by RA Fisher and S Wright. We cover Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, natural selection in infinite and finite populations, stochastic effects in finite populations (drift), recombination and linkage disequilibrium, and admixture and population subdivision. Moreover, we cover the most commonly used models of mutation, such as the infinite sites model and the infinite alleles model. The goal of this section is to give students a broad understanding of the statistical principles underlying population genetics and to provide a connection between these classical results and modern challenges in statistical genetics. In the second section of the course we cover coalescent theory. We introduce the basic coalescent model for constant Wright-Fisher populations. We then introduce commonly used extensions of this model to scenarios with recombination, population expansion and population subdivision. We introduce methods of parameter inference based on these models, including both simple method-of-moments estimates as well as more sophisticated Monte-Carlo based estimation methods. The goal of this section is to give students the ability to design realistic simulation algorithms and perform population genetic inference. Classes on population structure and population admixture (~4) will be taught by Noah Rosenberg. In the biweekly homeworks, we expect the students to be able to apply and extend the presented theory. Early in the course, each student will select a topic for a project; the student is expected to work on this project throughout the semester and to give at the end of the semester a written project report and a 20-minute presentation on the results of his analysis. Typical projects are " Simulate a model of rare variants under mutation-selection balance and estimate power for rare variants testing methods. " Calculate the contribution of low frequency variants to heritability in structured populations " Perform a principal components analysis on genetic data " Explore recent resequencing data for signs of natural selection.
  • Learning Objectives: See course description

BIOSTAT866: Advanced Topics in Genetic Modeling

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Zoellner, Sebastian (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 601, Biostat 602, Biostat 666 or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Advanced topics in quantitative genetics with emphasis on models for gene mapping, pedigree analysis, reconstruction of evolutionary trees, and molecular genetics experiments, computational mathematics, and statistical techniques such as Chen-Stein Poisson approximations, hidden Markov chains, and the EM algorithm introduced as needed.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT866

BIOSTAT870: Analysis of Repeated Measurements

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Han, Peisong (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: Math 417, Biostat 602, Biostat 651 and one of Biostat 690, Biostat 851, or Biostat 890
  • Description: Mixed model analysis of variance; multivariate profile analysis; linear mixed effects models with unbalanced designs, time-varying covariates, and structured covariance matrices; maximum likelihood (ML), restricted maximum likelihood (REML), and Bayes estimation and inference; nonlinear mixed effects models.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT870

BIOSTAT875: Advanced Topics in Survival Analysis

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Murray, Susan (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 675
  • Description: Lectures and readings from the literature on advanced topics in survival analysis. Covers regression for censored data, general event-history data and models, competing risks. Statistical, mathematical, and probabilistic tools used in survival analysis are extended for these general problems.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT875

BIOSTAT881: Topics In Advanced Causal Inference

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Morrison, Jean (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 601, BIOSTAT 602, BIOSTAT 650, BIOSTAT 651, BIOSTAT 653, BIOSTAT 801, and BIOSTAT 802 (concurrent also accepted).
  • Description: This course covers statistical theory and methodology for drawing causal conclusions from observational and experimental data. We will cover theoretical foundations including DAGs and SEMs, followed by special topics, which may include instrumental variable analysis, causal inference in high dimensions, and causal inference with longitudinal data.
  • Learning Objectives: At the end of the course the students will be able to: 1. Translate a scientific question into a causal contrast to be estimated. 2. Derive graphical models for investigating the conditions under which the causal contrasts of interest are identified from data collected under specific study designs. 3. Formulate adequate structural models for making inference about the causal contrasts of interest. 4. Implement simulations appropriate for investigating the properties of causal estimators.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT881

BIOSTAT882: Advanced Bayesian Inference

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Kang, Jian (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: N/A
  • Advisory Prerequisites: Biostatistics 682 or an equivalent course covering the basic Bayesian methods and theory. Previous experience in programming in R or C/C++ is required.
  • Description: This course focuses on advanced Bayesian theory and nonparametric Bayes methods including Gaussian processes, Dirichlet processes, deep neural networks, variable selection, and shrinkage priors, along with modern posterior computation algorithms including gradient based Markov chain Monte Carlo and variational Bayesian methods.
  • Learning Objectives: This course focuses on the advanced Bayesian inference methods including modeling, theory and computation. The target audience is the PhD candidates in Biostatistics who are interested in working on their research topics related to Bayesian statistics. R and C++ will be used for illustrations and practices.

BIOSTAT885: Nonparametric Statistics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Han, Peisong (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 601/602 or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Theory and techniques of nonparametrics and robustness. M-estimation, influence function, bootstrap, jackknife, generalized additive models, smoothing techniques, penalty functions, projection pursuit, CART.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT885

BIOSTAT890: Multivariate Statistical Models (Stat 640)

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: Math 417 and either Stat 511 or Biostat 602 and Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Derivation of multivariate techniques: multivariate estimation, T, criteria for testing linear hypothesis, test for additional information, testing covariance matrices, factor analysis, growth curves and elementary time series.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT890

BIOSTAT896: Spatial Statistics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 601, BIOSTAT 602, BIOSTAT 650, BIOSTAT 653
  • Description: This course will introduce the theory and methods of spatial and spatio-temporal statistics. It will present spatial and spatio-temporal statistical models and will discuss methods for inference on spatial processes within a geostatistical and a hierarchical Bayesian framework.
  • Syllabus for BIOSTAT896

BIOSTAT990: Dissertation/Pre-Candidacy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: (1-8 Full term, 1-4 Half term)
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted to status as a candidate.

BIOSTAT995: Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Admission to Doctoral Program(1-8 Full term, 1-4 Half term)
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student who has been admitted to status as a candidate.

EHS504: Genes and the Environment

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Prerequisites: None.
  • Description: In past years disease causation frequently was thought of as a "dichotomy" between genes ("nature") and the environment ("nurture"). More recently this view has been replaced with a more holistic perspective that emphasizes the importance of interactions between genes and environmental and/or occupational exposures. The focus of this course will be on interaction between genes and specific environmental and/or occupational exposures. The course will consist of detailed evaluation of specific examples of gene-exposure interaction (e.g., beryllium-related lung disease, peripheral neurotoxicity from organophosphate pesticides, bladder cancer and amine exposure) the underlying science of such examples, medical consequences, potential policy and social implications of current and future scientific knowledge, and review of current and pending legislation that address these issues. The course will meet for one two-hour session per week, and will be conducted in an advanced seminar-style format. Student will be expected to make presentations and lead discussion, in addition to presentations by faculty and outside guests. Student evaluations will be based on written reports, class participation and class presentation.

EHS556: Occupational Ergonomics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Joseph, Brad (Residential);
  • Offered Every other year (next semester: Fall 2022)
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Principles, concepts and procedures concerned with worker performance, health and safety. Topics include: biomechanics, job safety, anthropometry, work physiology, psychophysics, work stations, tools, work procedures, work standards, Musculoskeletal disorders, noise, vibration, heat stress and the analysis and design of work.
Concentration Competencies that EHS556 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Industrial Hygiene MPH Explain the physiological, toxicological, and/or biomechanical interactions of physical, chemical, biological, mechanical, and ergonomic agents, factors, and/or stressors found in the workplace with the human body EHS602, EHS556
EHS Industrial Hygiene MS Explain the physiological, toxicological, and/or biomechanical interactions of physical, chemical, biological, mechanical, and ergonomic agents, factors, and/or stressors found in the workplace with the human body EHS603, EHS556, EHS602

EHS576: Biological Agents

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Xi, Chuanwu (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Biology, Chem, Grad Standing or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Biological agents in the environment that have a substantial impact on human health.

EHS578: Practical Projects

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Practical Projects in the application of theory and principles of Environmental Health Sciences in public health settings. Course requirements include an approved practical work experience related to Environmental Health Sciences in consultation with a faculty advisor. May be elected more than once. Enrollment limited to Environmental Health Sciences majors with at least two full terms of prior registration.

EHS582: Principles of Community Air Pollution

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Dvonch, Tim (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Discussion of economic, nuisance, and health aspects, emphasizing sources, causes, effects, control measures, and the organization and administration of community control programs.
Concentration Competencies that EHS582 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Environmental Quality, Sustainability, and Health MPH Evaluate environmental quality and health, including environmental standards on air and water quality, and their effects on individual, community and global health EHS582, EHS570

EHS588: Environmental Law (SNRE 475)

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Last offered Winter 2021
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Introduces students to Environmental Law and the impact of the legal process on decisions that affect the environment. Topics include common law tort actions, toxic tort actions, statutory controls of pollution and other environmentally harmful activities. Additional areas include administrative agency structure and performance, Constitutional rights to environmental quality and more.

EHS594: Global Environment and Health

  • Graduate level
  • Both Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a first year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for online MPH students; Winter term(s) for online MS students.
  • 2 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Batterman, Stuart (Online MPH); Batterman, Stuart (Online MS);
  • Last offered Winter 2021
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH 514
  • Description: Minimize environmental risks, and promote health and sustainability. This course introduces the sources, transport and fate processes, and risks associated with pollutants in air, water and soil, describes sampling and assessment techniques, and presents mechanisms for management, including legal and regulatory approaches, markets and partnerships, and technological innovations.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Describe characteristics of pollutants and pollutant sources in all environmental media, including ambient air, indoor air, surface water, groundwater and soil, that are essential to understanding the potential for pollutant exposure and toxicity. 2. Obtain and analyze relevant data pertinent to environmental pollutant transport and fate, cross-media transfer, bioaccumulation, multimedia exposure pathways, and human exposure. 3. Describe and utilize concepts, terminology and models for mass balance approaches used in environmental modeling and assessments. 4. Specify monitoring needs, sampling approaches, and data quality objectives needed to characterize contaminants in air, water and soil 5. Obtain, describe and use standards and guidelines that pertain to exposure and risk-based limits for pollutants in air, water and soil. 6. Describe the rationale and assess the feasibility, applicability and performance of alternative management approaches to controlling environmental pollutants and promoting environmental health. 7. Utilize and interpret results of selected models that describe pollutant sources, transport and fate processes, and human exposure and risk, including the use of spreadsheet tools for modeling and data management.

EHS596: Climate, Justice, Health & Sustainability

  • Graduate level
  • Both Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for online MPH students; Winter term(s) for online MS students.
  • 2 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Charles, Simone O'Neill, Marie (Online MPH); Charles, Simone O'Neill, Marie (Online MS);
  • Last offered Winter 2021
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH 514
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Effective climate action that simultaneously acts to reduce inequalities must focus on climate justice if climate action is to result in resilient communities. We will focus on the science of climate change and health impacts through the lens of climate justice and environmental justice (EJ) for disproportionately impacted communities.
  • Learning Objectives: Learning objectives for this course are: a. Explain key features of the phenomenon of climate change (and the associated climate justice) including major drivers, time course, uncertainties, impact and distribution of associated risks b. Describe the major health-relevant exposures, specific to disparate communities, that are sensitive to climate change c. Describe the major anticipated health effects associated with exposures to disparate communities affected by climate change d. Discuss the health impacts of climate change specific to vulnerable populations e. Explain important tools used for assessing vulnerability of disparate communities to climate change impacts f. Discuss prevention, adaptation, and mitigation actions, with considerations of climate justice, to prevent and control anticipated exposures due to climate change g. Evaluate policy options for climate change resilience, mitigation and adaptation at the global, national, institutional and individual scales h. Discuss public health responses to anticipated climate change-related health outcomes in disparate communities

EHS597: Environmental Health and Policy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential and Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a first year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for residential students; Winter term(s) for online MPH students; Winter term(s) for online MS students.
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Dvonch, Tim (Residential); Dvonch, Tim (Online MPH); Dvonch, Tim (Online MS);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course will provide the knowledge and skills necessary to assess policies and their impact on environmental health and sustainability issues, and understand the role that governmental and organizational bodies play in the development, implementation, and oversight of these policies.
  • Learning Objectives: The students taking this class are expected to be able to: C1) Analyze environmental health policies, considering stakeholder engagement and the role of state, federal, and international agencies; C2) Understand the role of bodies and agencies in environmental health policies at local, state, federal, and international levels; C3) Evaluate policies for their impact on public health and health equity; 4) Recognize the challenges to successful development and implementation of environmental health policies.

EHS603: Occupational and Environmental Disease

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Robins, Thomas (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course will focus on selected topics in occupational and environmental disease, including an understanding of causation and assessing the scientific literature. The goal will be to cover major toxins/exposures and also key organ systems and/or disease categories, reviewing conditions of historical significance as well as current relevance, all within the concepts and contexts of occupational and environmental epidemiology. Major health effects and disease categories to be covered include: lung diseases related to asbestos and other pneumoconiotic dusts; immunologic lung diseases such as asthma and hypersensitivity pneumonitis; illness caused by organic solvents and persistent organics; pesticide related diseases; occupational skin disease; occupational hearing loss; occupational infectious diseases; illness caused by metals such as lead, mercury, arsenic, and cadmium; environmental and occupational carcinogens; health effects of ionizing radiation including radon; health issues related to outdoor air pollution and indoor air quality including building related illness and mold; health effects of shift work and the built environment; issues of reproductive health; disparities in occupational and environmental health; and other selected topics.
Concentration Competencies that EHS603 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Environmental Health Promotion and Policy MPH Recognize adverse health consequences of common environmental and occupational exposures EHS603
EHS Environmental Health Sciences MPH Recognize adverse health consequences of common environmental and occupational exposures to chemical, physical, and biological hazards EHS603
EHS Environmental Health Sciences MS Recognize adverse health consequences of common environmental and occupational exposures to chemical, physical, and biological hazards EHS603
EHS Industrial Hygiene MS Explain the physiological, toxicological, and/or biomechanical interactions of physical, chemical, biological, mechanical, and ergonomic agents, factors, and/or stressors found in the workplace with the human body EHS603, EHS556, EHS602

EHS608: Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): O'Neill, Marie (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Introduces topics in environmental and occupational epidemiology, methods to evaluate health effects of exposures in environment and workplace, and policy and public health applications. Lectures cover key environmental and occupational epidemiology research; student-led discussions critique current literature. Students learn about scope, limitations, applications and future of environmental and occupational epidemiology.
  • This course is cross-listed with This course is already cross-listed with EPID 608. in the Epidemiology department.
Concentration Competencies that EHS608 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EPID Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology MPH Design an epidemiologic study of an environmental or occupational factor and a health outcome that tests one or more specific hypotheses EPID608, EHS608

EHS614: Water and Global Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Xi, Chuanwu (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2021
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Poor water quality, insufficient quantity and inadequate access to water are among the most serious threats to human health worldwide. This course analyzes the historical and contemporary roles that water plays on global health. Key drivers that affect water quality and quantity (with linkages to human health impacts) are investigated, including agriculture, climate change, population growth and urbanization, natural resources, international trade, and regional conflicts. Both theoretical and practical methods are used to examine real world cases. A systems framework is used to develop sustainable and appropriate solutions that consider individual, social, technological, and institutional factors.
  • Learning Objectives: L1 - the historical role of water in shaping the growth and development of humans and societies L2 - similarities and differences of human health and disease issues across the world (e.g., developed versus developing nations, region X versus region Y) that are water-related L3 - how key drivers (e.g., population growth, agriculture, international trade, biodiversity, resource exploitation) exacerbate water supply, security, sanitation and waste L4 - the key biological, chemical, and physical stressors in water systems around the world L5 - systems approaches and how these may be used to tackle complex environmental health issues L6 -the roles of individuals, scientists, organizations (non-governmental, governmental), and nations in the management and sustainability of water resources L7 - sustainable solutions and evaluative schemes/metrics to 'water and global health' at the individual-, technological-, and institutional-levels

EHS651: Occupational Health, Safety and Environmental Program Management

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Offered Every other year (next semester: Winter 2023)
  • Last offered Winter 2021
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course introduces future leaders of plant and corporate level occupational health, safety and environmental programs to the breadth of functions and activities routinely performed by OHSE managers. Among the topics discussed are: OHSE organization structure and staffing, management systems, program content and metrics, budgeting, risk management, incident investigation and management, emergency preparedness and response, regulatory compliance, legal systems, health and safety culture, and prevention through design processes.
  • Learning Objectives: Students will gain a fundamental understanding of: (1) How OHSE programs are typically organized, the roles and responsibilities of OHSE managers, and expectations of other OHSE stakeholders in the organization. (2) Challenges associated with managing personnel and processes, including dealing with ethical issues, setting goals and measuring performance, hiring and training professionals, and managing consultants. (3) Financial aspects of program management, such as risk management and insurance, budgeting, workers compensation, and legal liability for both corporate activities and products. (4) Incident investigation and management, as well as emergency planning and response management. (5) Regulatory rulemaking, inspections, and compliance management processes.
Concentration Competencies that EHS651 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Industrial Hygiene MPH Describe the relevance of business and managerial practices to workplace health and safety EHS651

EHS653: Environmental Sampling And Analysis Laboratory

  • Graduate level
  • Both Residential and OJOC
  • Winter term(s) for OJOC and residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for OJOC and residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Grubb, Greg Charles, Simone
  • Prerequisites: EHS 652 or permission of instructor
  • Description: This course explores environmental physical, chemical and biological contaminant exposure assessment for regulatory compliance and epidemiologic risk estimation for public health. It focuses on theory, equipment use, instrumentation, methodologies, and strategies used for measuring and analyzing environmental contaminants, including chemical, physical and biological agents. Emphasis is placed on air monitoring, dermal, surface, noise, soil, water, and wastewater contaminant sampling and data analysis.

EHS654: Control of Exposures to Airborne Contaminants

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Grubb, Greg (Residential);
  • Offered Every other year (next semester: Winter 2024)
  • Prerequisites: Grad status
  • Description: Discussion of the principles of controlling airborne contaminants in working and living environments. It deals with general environmental and local exhaust ventilation for indoor spaces, filtration and emission control for the ambient environment, and personal respiratory protection. Specific topics include: basic properties of air and aerodynamics, and behavior of airborne contaminants; general dilution and local exhaust ventilation concepts, methods and design; fan performance and selection; air cleaning equipment; ventilation testing, OSHA and EPA standards, indoor air quality, and others.
Concentration Competencies that EHS654 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Industrial Hygiene MPH Recommend and evaluate engineering, administrative, and personal protective controls and/or other interventions to reduce or eliminate workplace hazards EHS654

EHS655: Human Exposure Analysis

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Neitzel, Richard (Residential);
  • Offered Next offering Winter 2024
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: Graduate standing
  • Description: Students taking this course will learn how to conduct statistical analyses of human exposures, and will apply these skills to a dataset containing exposure and health outcome data. They will also develop skills for understanding, interpreting, and communicating exposure information and for identifying and communicating evidence-based risk management recommendations.

EHS657: Advanced Exposure Assessment

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Meeker, John (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2020
  • Prerequisites: EHS507, BIOSTAT503/equivalent, EPID503/equivalent
  • Description: The course will introduce classical, contemporary, and cutting-edge approaches to the estimation of human exposure to environmental and occupational agents as it relates to epidemiology studies as well as risk science, regulatory compliance, exposure source/route apportionment, and susceptibility factors. Qualitative and quantitative methods in exposure science will be covered, including surrogate measures, exposure modeling, and biological markers of exposure, in addition to statistical concepts such as exposure measurement error and efficient study design.

EHS660: Environmental Epigenetics and Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Dolinoy, Dana (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2021
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course examines principles and applications of epigenetics as they relate to human nutrition, environmental exposures and disease etiology, including mechanisms and policy implications. Case studies evaluate processes using animal and human examples drawn from the literature. Students will be introduced to laboratory methods and emerging technologies for examining epigenetics.
  • This course is cross-listed with NUTR 660 in the NUTR 660 department.

EHS668: Professional Seminar in Occupational Health

  • Graduate level
  • Both Residential and OJOC
  • Winter term(s) for OJOC and residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for OJOC and residential students;
  • Instructor(s): O'Neill, Marie
  • Last offered Winter 2021
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: Seminars in contemporary occupational health topics and issues. Presentations by noted authorities from industry, labor organizations, governments, and academia.

EHS674: Environmental and Health Risk Modeling

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Jolliet, Olivier (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Good knowledge in calculus
  • Advisory Prerequisites: Principles of risk assessment
  • Description: EHS 674 uses a hands-on approach to experiment and interpret modeling techniques applied to environmental health assessment. It first addresses steady-state multi-media modeling, exposure modeling, dermal uptake and pharmacokinetic modeling. It then expands the theory to dynamic modeling and Monte-Carlo approaches applied to probalistic risk assessment.

EHS675: Data Analysis for Environmental Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Park, Sung Kyun (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2021
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 560 and EPID 503 or 600
  • Description: This course will introduce non-parametric smoothing methods, such as splines, locally weighted polynomial regression (LOESS) and generalized additive models (GAM), and focus on continuous environmental exposure variables. It will also deal with analysis of correlated data, including longitudinal analysis and time-series analysis that are widely used in environmental epidemiology. It will provide an opportunity to analyze actual population data to learn how to model environmental epidemiologic data, and is designed particularly for students who pursue environmental epidemiologic research. The course will consist of lectures and hands-on practices in computer labs, homework assignments and final projects. R, a free software environment for statistical computing and graphics, will be used.
Concentration Competencies that EHS675 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EPID Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology MPH Interpret epidemiologic results from higher-order biostatistical techniques applied to these data, such as linear regression, logistic regression, mixed effects models, and graphic techniques EHS675

EHS688: Professional Development in Environmental Health Sciences II

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 0.5 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Robins, Thomas (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: The course is open to all EHS MPH students who are in the 2nd term of their 1st year in the program. It is expected that enrolled students have completed EHS 687 Environmental Health Sciences Prof. Development, Part I in the 1st term of their 1st year
  • Description: This course is designed to introduce students to the Department of Environmental Health Sciences, resources available in School of Public Health and the broader University of Michigan environment, to prepare students for their internship experience, and to introduce students to different types of careers in environmental health.
  • This course is cross-listed with .

EHS697: Readings

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr
  • Description: Supervised study/review of a selected topic in environmental health, occupational health, nutrition and/or toxicology. May be elected more than once for a maximum of six credits.

EHS698: Research

  • Graduate level
  • Both Residential and OJOC
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for OJOC and residential students;
  • 1-6 credit hour(s) for OJOC and residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Original research investigation of a special topic in environmental health, occupational health, nutrition and/or toxicology. May be elected more than once for a maximum of six credits.

EHS699: Master's Thesis

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Perm of Thesis Advisor
  • Description: This course shall be elected by students enrolled in Master's degree programs that require a formal written thesis as a condition of program completion. The thesis shall be defended in front of the student's thesis committee. The course grade will reflect the student's accomplishments relative to the thesis and its defense. The course is to be elected only once.

EHS717: Toxicological Pathology Laboratory

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Bergin, Ingrid (Residential);
  • Offered Every other year (Next semester: Fall 2022)
  • Prerequisites: EHS 616 or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: This laboratory course will provide an introduction to the histopathology associated with chemical exposures. Students will perform routine histological maneuvers on tissues from rats treated with "unknown" chemicals. Following microscopic inspection of tissues, students will describe the pathological process produced in each tissue and will identify the class of (or specific) chemical to which the organism was exposed.

EHS796: Special Topics in Environmental Health Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Lecture, seminars and readings selected on a current or emerging topic or theme in the environmental health sciences. The specific material and format will vary by semester and instructor.
Concentration Competencies that EHS796 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Environmental Health Promotion and Policy MPH Analyze policies addressing environmental health issues EHS796

EHS850: Research Design And Proposal Development In Environmental Health Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Batterman, Stuart Charles, Simone (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Students will be able to understand all parts of the research process including conceptualization of a research question, formulation of hypotheses, development of a research plan, selection of appropriate methods from a variety of data collection strategies, development of an appropriate data analysis plan, and preparation of a research proposal.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Differentiate between key funding agencies for public health and understand their mandates 2. Review and evaluate the quality of scientific literature including identifying knowledge gaps 3. Develop a scientific idea by conducting a critical assessment of current literature and preliminary results 4. Develop hypotheses to test in a scientific study 5. Differentiate between research strategies pertinent to proposed hypotheses 6. Describe selected research strategies to test outlined hypotheses 7. Design a plan for analyzing data pertinent to scientific study 8. Construct a mock grant proposal around research topic of interest (specifically specific aims, significance, innovation, and approach sections of a grant application)

EHS899: Advanced Research

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-6 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Original investigations of a specific topic in environmental health, occupational health, nutrition and/or toxicology. Designed for doctoral students performing research prior to passing their qualifying exam. May be elected more than once.

EHS990: Dissertation/Pre-Candidacy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to status as candidate.

EHS995: Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students who have been admitted to status as candidate.

EPID299: Independent Research for Undergraduates

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Offered Every semester
  • Last offered Fall 2022
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Students do an independent microbiology research project under the supervision of afaculty member in the Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology program.
  • Learning Objectives: Students learn both specific laboratory techniques and in general how to carryout independent research.

EPID399: Independent Research for Undergraduates

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Offered Every semester
  • Last offered Fall 2022
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr. and at least Junior status
  • Description: Students do an independent microbiology research project under the supervision of a faculty member in the Hospital & Molecular Epidemiology program.

EPID460: Introduction to Bacterial Pathogenesis

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Rickard, Alex (Residential);
  • Offered Every Winter
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Prerequisites: Introductory Microbiology and Genetics or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: This course covers the basics of the biochemistry, molecular biology, and genetics of chemotaxis and flagella, pili and adhesins, extracellular proteases, bacterial toxins, invasion and intracellular growth, phase and antigenic variation, gene transfer, LPS, iron, M-proteins, capsules, chemotherapy, antibiotic resistance and global regulation of virulence elements.
  • Syllabus for EPID460

EPID507: Microbial Control: Sterilization, Disinfection and Manipulation

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Rickard, Alex (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: Introductory classes in microbiology and biochemistry - contact instructor if in doubt
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: The influence of microorganisms on human-health is significant and control strategies often rely on the use of physical (heat, UV, etc) and chemical (antimicrobial, antibiofilm, etc) technologies. This course will focus on such endeavors with particular focus on broad acting antimicrobials (less emphasis on antibiotics) and new/remerging microbial control technologies.

EPID513: Vaccine in Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Yang, Zhenhua (Residential);
  • Last offered Fall 2021
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH370 or EPID512
  • Description: This course introduces essential vaccinology, covering pre-clinical vaccine development, clinical trials, new vaccine licensing, immunization program design and evaluation. It also introduces population transmission dynamics concepts, and the impact of pathogen and human population diversity on vaccination. Recent advancements in major types of non-infectious vaccines will also be discussed.
  • This course is cross-listed with in the PUBHLTH413 department.

EPID516: Genomics in Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Smith, Jennifer (Residential);
  • Offered Every Winter
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Prerequisites: Epid 503 or equivalent; Epid 515 or equivalent; Biostat 503 or equivalent
  • Description: This course relates genomics to the core public health discipline of epidemiology emphasizing the use of genomics to help describe disease frequency and distribution and to gain insights into biological etiologies. Topics include genetic material in disease, in families and in populations; the investigation of multifactorial traits; model-based linkage analysis; model-free linkage analysis; segregation analysis; allele association and linkage disequilibrium; and gene-gene interactions and gene-environment interactions. Issues related to implementing studies are considered.

EPID525: Clinical and Diagnostic Microbiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Prerequisites: At least 1 prior microbiology course or permission of the instructor
  • Description: This course describes methods used by clinical and public health microbiologists to detect clinically relevant microorganisms in patient specimens, and how this information is used in patient management. Students will gain an understanding of processes by which microbiology data is generated and its relevance to clinicians and epidemiologists.

EPID560: Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenesis

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Rickard, Alex (Residential);
  • Offered Every Winter
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status and Intro Microbiology and Biochemistry or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Microbial structures and their relation to basic mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis; structure, function, and genetics of bacterial toxins; and host resistance and immunity. Discussions of pathogenic organisms of major public health importance, diseases caused, and their epidemiology.
  • Syllabus for EPID560

EPID565: Research in Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-6 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Martin, Emily (Residential);
  • Offered every year
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Investigation of a selected problem planned and carried out by each student. Pertinent literature, investigational approaches, and progress in the investigations are discussed in seminars. May be taken more than once for up to six credits. Usually taken first for one credit. This is the Capstone Course for Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology Students.

EPID582: Molecular Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Offered Every Winter
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Prerequisites: (EPID 600 and 601) or PUBHLTH 512
  • Description: Provide an overview of cutting-edge approaches for microbial genomic analysis, with a focus on their application in the emerging field of genomic epidemiology. Lectures will be reinforced with discussions and extensive hands-on training. Students will gain experience on the command-line and in performing downstream analysis and visualization in R.
  • Learning Objectives: Not applicable
  • This course is cross-listed with MICROBIO 582 in the Microbiology department.
Concentration Competencies that EPID582 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EPID Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology MPH Evaluate the use of different molecular tools in an outbreak investigation EPID582
EPID Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology MPH Appropriately interpret the results of a molecular measure used in an epidemiologic study EPID582

EPID594: Key Concepts in Spatial Analysis

  • Graduate level
  • Both Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for online MPH students; Winter term(s) for online MS students.
  • 2 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Zelner, Jonathan (Online MPH); Zelner, Jonathan (Online MS);
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Prerequisites: EPID592
  • Description: In this course, students will gain familiarity with the key issues and statistical and theoretical tools for asking and answering epidemiological questions using spatial data.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Identify challenges to causal inference using spatial data. 2. Evaluate and employ appropriate analytic methods for diverse public health questions. 3. Fit basic regression models to spatial data and evaluate model fit.

EPID595: Applied Spatial Modeling

  • Graduate level
  • Both Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for online MPH students; Winter term(s) for online MS students.
  • 3 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 3 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Prerequisites: EPID 592 and EPID 594
  • Description: The large availability of geographically indexed health data, along with advances in computing, have enabled the development of statistical methods for the analysis of spatial epidemiological data. This course will introduce students to the most commonly used statistical models used to understand spatial variation in disease risk.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of the course students will be able to: (i) Recognize different types of spatial data. (ii) Formulate research questions and determine the appropriate spatial statistical model to analyze the data. (iii) Understand the concept of spatial correlation and how to estimate it in point-level spatial data. (iv) Include spatial random effect in generalized linear models for the analysis of spatial data. (v) Interpret the results of a spatial generalized linear model. (vi) Perform spatial interpolation of point-referenced data over space to predict missing data at unsampled locations. (vii) Smooth disease rates and disease counts over space using multilevel hierarchical models. (viii) Understand the definition of a (disease) cluster. (ix) Obtain a kernel density estimate of the intensity function representing the likelihood of observing a disease case at a given location. (x) Identify clusters of disease cases via appropriate statistical methods. (xi) Formulate statistical models to characterize spatial variation in the distribution of disease cases.

EPID602: EPID Methods II: Applied Epidemiologic Data Analysis

  • Graduate level
  • Residential and Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a first year course for Online students
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students; Fall term(s) for online MPH students; Fall term(s) for online MS students.
  • 4 credit hour(s) for residential students; 4 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 4 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Baylin, Ana (Residential); Baylin, Ana (Online MPH); Baylin, Ana (Online MS);
  • Offered Every Year
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Prerequisites: Epid 600; or EPID 601. or EPID503, or permission of the instructor.
  • Description: A practicum in epidemiologic data analysis designed to integrate and apply concepts learned in previous biostatistics and epidemiologic methods courses. Students learn practical skills to analyze and interpret epidemiologic data with continuous and dichotomous outcome variables through lectures and hands-on exercises.
Concentration Competencies that EPID602 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EPID General Epidemiology MPH Describe population patterns of health-related risk factors and health-related outcomes in terms of person, place, and time EPID600, EPID602
EPID General Epidemiology MPH Compare the relative strengths and weaknesses of common epidemiologic study designs (e.g., cross-sectional, cohort, case-control, randomized experiments) EPID600, EPID602
EPID General Epidemiology MPH Interpret the impact of bias, confounding, and effect modification on causal inference in epidemiologic research EPID600, EPID602
EPID Clinical Research-Epidemiology MS Analyze research data and interpret these results from a population health or clinical-translational perspective EPID602, BIOSTAT522

EPID603: Professional Development Seminar

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Power, Laura (Residential);
  • Offered Every Year
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: EPID 603 is a Winter term course to be taken by OEE, GE, and GHE students in year one. Students are exposed to various topics such as responsible research, ethics, group dynamics, DE&I, and career planning. This course allows GHE, GE, and OEE students to think strategically about their career in Public Health.

EPID604: Applications of Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
  • Description: Application of epidemiological methods and concepts to analysis of data from epidemiological, clinical or laboratory studies. Introduction to independent research and scientific writing under faculty guidance.
  • Syllabus for EPID604

EPID607: Communicable Diseases in Public Health Practice

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Power, Laura (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course addresses the role of the infectious diseases epidemiologist in governmental public health, focusing on case definition development, notifiable disease reporting, immunization use, and surveillance. Students will learn the biology and epidemiology of important communicable diseases and will develop skills in outbreak investigations and public health response.

EPID608: Environmental Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Handal, Alexis (Residential);
  • Offered Every Winter
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Prerequisites: Epid 600 or 503, Biostat 553 or 503
  • Description: This course will serve as an introduction to topics in environmental epidemiology, covering major areas of current inquiry in this field. It will convey the basic tools required to critically read the literature and to develop appropriate study designs in light of intended applications. The class meeting will include lectures and student-led discussions. This course will review epidemiologic methods used in evaluating the health effects of physical, biological and chemical agents in the environment and the available evidence on the health effects of such exposures. We will also consider policy and public health applications of the scientific evidence. Topics include lectures on methodology and major environmental exposures, discussions based on review and critiques of current literature, and presentations by outside experts on specific environmental epidemiology issues of current interest. After taking this course, students should have a better understanding of the scope, limitations, applications and future of environmental epidemiology.
  • This course is cross-listed with EHS/EPID 608 in the SPH Environmental Health Sciences department.
Concentration Competencies that EPID608 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EPID Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology MPH Design an epidemiologic study of an environmental or occupational factor and a health outcome that tests one or more specific hypotheses EPID608, EHS608

EPID617: Social epidemiology II: Social and economic determinants of population health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Kobayashi, Lindsay (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2021
  • Prerequisites: EPID 514 or permission of instructor
  • Description: The objective of this course is to examine, in depth, some of the key social determinants of health in populations. The course is organized around substantive topic areas (e.g. obesity, disability, mental health, youth and substance abuse, stress and social support, neighborhoods and environments), with a focus on understanding the role of social factors in shaping health. The course draws heavily on epidemiologic perspectives and methods as tools to improve our understanding of population health, and is designed to expose students to different methodological approaches and their strengths/limitations in defining population health, understanding its determinants, and assessing the mechanisms by which these determinants influence population health. The course is a combination of lectures and student discussions, with an emphasis on class participation.

EPID621: Cancer Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Mondul, Alison (Residential);
  • Offered Every Winter
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Prerequisites: EPID 503, EPID 600 or PUBHLTH 512; or PhD standing
  • Description: The course will review the socio-demographic magnitude of cancer, basic concepts of cancer biology and the causes of cancer. Methods for evaluating genetic factors, tobacco, alcohol, radiation, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, viruses and nutrition will be reviewed in lectures and by classroom discussion of selected publications.

EPID624: Readings in Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Offered Every Year
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Review of literature on selected subjects under guidance of individual faculty members and through scheduled seminars at which reports are presented. May be elected more than once.

EPID625: Controversial topics in the role of nutrition on chronic disease

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Baylin, Ana (Residential);
  • Last offered Fall 2020
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600 or EPID503 AND BIOSTAT 501 or BIOSTAT 521
  • Description: This public health-oriented course will provide students the opportunity to advance their knowledge in nutrition and chronic disease research from a population perspective and help them to better interpret epidemiologic studies on nutrition and chronic disease.
  • This course is cross-listed with EPID625/NUTR626 in the Epidemiology and Nutritional Sciences department.
  • Syllabus for EPID625

EPID634: Foundations in infectious disease transmission modeling

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Brouwer, Andrew (Residential);
  • Offered Every Winter
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600, BIOSTATS 503, 553, or another course that provides a similar background in probability and statistics
  • Description: Infectious disease transmission modeling provides a theoretical framework for the field of infectious disease epidemiology; i.e., it provides a basis for thinking about study design, data analysis, and decision making. This course will serve as an introduction to infectious disease transmission modeling, teaching more quantitative concepts of disease transmission.

EPID636: Cancer Risk and Epidemiology Modeling

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Brouwer, Andrew Meza Rodriguez, Rafael (Residential);
  • Last offered Fall 2021
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 560 or permission from the instructor
  • Description: This course will introduce 1) the concepts of multistage carcinogenesis and the analysis of cancer epidemiology using mathematical models of carcinogenesis; 2) the analysis of cancer prevention strategies using Markov cancer natural history models. Students will learn how to develop and fit multistage and cancer natural history models in R.

EPID641: Measurement Theory and Instrument Design

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Offered Every Winter
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600
  • Description: Measurement of Health-Related Risk Factors and Outcomes

EPID642: Sampling and Power

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Park, Sung Kyun (Residential);
  • Offered Every Winter
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600 (or equivalent), EPID 640 (or equivalent), and BIOSTAT 503 or 553 (or equivalent)
  • Description: This course introduces 1) various sampling methods (simple random sampling, stratified sampling, cluster sampling, convenience sampling, control sampling strategies in case-control design) and 2) power and sample size calculations. This course consists of lectures and hands-on exercises in computer labs, homework assignments, and a final project.
  • Syllabus for EPID642
Concentration Competencies that EPID642 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EPID General Epidemiology MPH Apply core aspects of field methods in epidemiology (e.g., survey design, sampling and power, surveillance) EPID642, EPID643

EPID664: Field Methods in Epidemiology for Developing Countries

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Handal, Alexis (Residential);
  • Offered Every Winter
  • Last offered Winter 2021
  • Prerequisites: Epid 503 or Epid 600
  • Description: This course is for students and researchers interested in pursuing collaborative epidemiologic research in international settings. The course will focus on steps and procedures for setting up and conducting international epidemiologic studies. Topics will include relationship between research groups and host country policy makers and collaborators, cultural and logistical differences between research studies in the U.S. and international settings. Other topics will include developing and maintaining research infrastructure, research design, field operations, anticipated obstacles, monitoring, ethical and IRB requirement for international studies, funding, and plans for maintaining future collaborations. Occasional guest lecturers, actively involved in international epidemiologic research will be integrated into the syllabus.
Concentration Competencies that EPID664 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EPID Global Health Epidemiology MPH Apply the steps in developing research infrastructure for population health studies in low- and middle-income countries, including consideration of local ethics and IRB review EPID506, EPID664
EPID Global Health Epidemiology MPH Develop strategies and capacity for resolving problems that arise when conducting epidemiology studies in low- and middle-income countries EPID664, EPID665

EPID665: Research Seminar in International Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): O'Neill, Marie (Residential);
  • Offered Every Winter
  • Last offered Winter 2021
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.; restricted to 2nd year Epidemiology International Health MPH students
  • Description: The seminar provides a forum for the discussion of capstone research projects in international health. Students in both the General Epidemiology and the Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology tracks of the International Health Program present their research findings. In addition, the seminar includes presentations of international health research by other speakers from the University and elsewhere.
Concentration Competencies that EPID665 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EPID Global Health Epidemiology MPH Develop strategies and capacity for resolving problems that arise when conducting epidemiology studies in low- and middle-income countries EPID664, EPID665
EPID Global Health Epidemiology MPH Demonstrate contextual expertise in at least one country/region including knowledge of the structure of health systems and the public health infrastructure, as well as major public health intervention programs EPID665, EPID506

EPID666: Health and Socioeconomic Development

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Stein, Howard (Residential);
  • Offered Every Winter
  • Last offered Winter 2021
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Description: Reviews links between health conditions and socioeconomic development in low-income countries and trends in health and development indicators; socio-economic determinants of health, including poverty and income, education, nutrition, fertility, and culture and behavior; impact of globalization in terms of neo-liberal policies, trade and capital flows and the urbanization and their growth of the informal economy; examines the effects of health changes on economic growth and development.
  • This course is cross-listed with 662 in the CAAS department.

EPID673: Epidemiology of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Villamor, Eduardo (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 521 and EPID 600
  • Description: This course will survey both classic and emerging literature describing the DOHaD paradigm from an epidemiological perspective. The course will have a structured discussion format.
  • Learning Objectives: Through analysis and discussion of research papers in the field, students will be able to: 1) Identify sources of bias in DOHaD research and anticipate their potential effects on estimates of association; 2) Weight evidence on DOHaD according to the relative methodological strength of epidemiological reports; 3) Distinguish strengths and limitations of family studies and randomized trials in DOHaD epidemiology; 4) Link indicators used in epidemiological studies with the underlying biological processes they intend to measure; 5) Integrate evidence from different sources into conceptual frames on DOHaD topics; 6) Understand different strategies for analysis of epidemiological data in DOHaD research. In addition, this course will cover the following learning objective from the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH): LO3. Explain the role of quantitative and qualitative methods and sciences in describing and assessing a population's health.

EPID674: Epidemiologic Data Analysis Using R

  • Graduate level
  • Residential and Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students; Winter term(s) for online MPH students; Winter term(s) for online MS students.
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 3 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Bakulski, Kelly (Residential); Hayashi, Michael (Online MPH); Hayashi, Michael (Online MS);
  • Offered Every Year
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: (EPID 640, PH 512) or (EPID 600, BIOSTAT 521 or 501)
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course introduces the R statistical programming language for epidemiologic data analysis. Content focuses on organizing, managing, and manipulating data; basic graphics in R; and descriptive methods and regression models widely used in epidemiology. The 2-credit option includes statistical modeling in R. The 3-credit option adds programming in R.

EPID675: Data Analysis for Environmental Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Park, Sung Kyun (Residential);
  • Offered Every Winter
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 560 and EPID 503 or 600
  • Description: This course will introduce non-parametric smoothing methods, such as splines, locally weighted polynomial regression (LOESS) and generalized additive models (GAM), and focus on continuous environmental exposure variables. It will also deal with analysis of multi-level data including analyses of longitudinal data and complex sampling data, and time-series analysis that are widely used in environmental epidemiology. The course will cover how to handle limits of detection in environmental exposure data. It will provide an opportunity to analyze actual population data to learn how to model environmental epidemiologic data, and is designed particularly for students who pursue environmental epidemiologic research. The course will consist of lectures and hands-on practices in computer labs, homework assignments and final projects. R, a free software environment for statistical computing and graphics, will be used.
  • This course is cross-listed with EHS675 in the Environmental Health Sciences department.
  • Syllabus for EPID675

EPID679: Epidemiology of Psychiatric and Substance Use Disorders

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Mezuk, Briana (Residential);
  • Offered Every Winter
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: EPID602
  • Description: Introduces the epidemiology of psychiatric and substance use disorders. Addresses conceptual and methodological considerations in psychiatric research, descriptive and analytic epidemiology of common psychiatric and substance use disorders, and issues of classification and measurement for epidemiologic research. Students analyze epidemiologic data pertaining to psychiatric and substance use disorders.
  • Learning Objectives: Upon completing this course students will be able to: -Describe the epidemiology of the major psychiatric and substance use disorders of childhood, adulthood, and late adulthood -Understand epidemiologic methods used to assess psychiatric and substance use disorders in the community -Demonstrate the ability to critically assess epidemiologic data and scientific articles pertaining to psychiatric and substance use disorders -Demonstrate ability to obtain and analyze various epidemiologic data sources with information pertaining to psychiatric and substance use disorders -Prepare a scientific paper pertaining to epidemiology of psychiatric or substance use disorders -Improve public communication skills through class presentations and discussions

EPID680: Hospital Epidemiology I

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Yang, Zhenhua (Residential);
  • Offered Every Winter
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: The course provides an overview and essential knowledge in hospital epidemiology. It covers healthcare associated infection surveillance, prevention, and control, healthcare outcome assessment, and healthcare employee health promotion. The course also discusses important emerging issues in healthcare settings, which include antibiotics resistance, emerging infectious diseases, and biological disaster preparedness.
Concentration Competencies that EPID680 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EPID Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology MPH Apply epidemiologic principles to the design and implementation of interventions in a healthcare setting EPID680
EPID Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology MPH Apply principles of antibiotic stewardship EPID680

EPID684: Theory and applications of spatial epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Zelner, Jonathan (Residential);
  • Offered Every Winter
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 501 or BIOSTAT 521
  • Advisory Prerequisites: intermediate biostatistics course recommended
  • Description: This course provides a survey of spatial problems in epidemiology with a specific focus on public health applications of spatial analysis. Topics covered will include the different types of spatial data, causal inference with spatial data, and specific examples of applications of spatial analysis to epidemiological problems.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Describe the circumstances when spatial analysis is necessary and useful for different types of epidemiological problems and contexts. 2. Understand and describe key issues of causal inference in spatial analysis (e.g. ecological and atomistic fallacies). 3. Become familiar with statistical concepts underlying spatial epidemiological analysis.

EPID806: History of Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Baylin, Ana (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2014
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: EPID601 or similar
  • Description: This is a methodology course which focuses on the historical evolution of methods (e.g., study designs) and concepts (e.g., confounding, bias, interaction and causal inference) that constitute today's epidemiology. The course will also include a brief history of Public Health and history of the Department of Epidemiology at Michigan.

EPID813: Advanced seminar on public health and aging

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Last offered Fall 2020
  • Prerequisites: Doctoral standing at UM with training in research methods and statistics in relevant disciplines.
  • Description: This course provides advanced training in aging research pertaining to the public health and well-being of older adults. It will cover a variety of substantive and methodological areas in aging-related epidemiologic research and geriatrics. Selection of specific topics will in part depend on the interests of participating students.

EPID824: Advanced Epidemiologic Methods

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Villamor, Eduardo (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2020
  • Prerequisites: EPID601
  • Advisory Prerequisites: EPID600 and EPID601 or equivalent, and doctoral student taking comprehensive exam; other students admitted by permission of instructor
  • Description: Advanced epidemiologic methods, with an emphasis on causality in epidemiologic research, theoretical considerations and interpretations of findings.
Concentration Competencies that EPID824 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EPID Epidemiologic Science PhD Evaluate epidemiological study designs and advanced epidemiological methods, and select the most appropriate method to address a specific study question EPID811, EPID824, Comprehensive Exam
EPID Epidemiologic Science PhD Demonstrate a thorough understanding of causal inference, sources of bias, and methods to improve the validity of epidemiologic studies EPID811, EPID824, Comprehensive Exam

EPID825: Writing Grant Applications

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Prerequisites: Basic epidemiology methods (EPID 600 or equivalent)
  • Advisory Prerequisites: Basic competencies in epidemiology research methods, including biostatistics (e.g., Biostat 523), Measurement and Instrument Design (e.g., EPID 641); Sampling and Power Analysis (e.g., EPID 642)
  • Description: This doctoral-level course will cover basic information on and skills in writing effective grant applications. It will provide extensive opportunity to practice grant writing skills in a positive and inclusive environment with instructor and peer feedback. The course will also provide key information and resources on the different types of grant mechanisms available to researchers in public health sciences, and introduce students to the grant review and funding process. The course will be offered seminar-style. Individual classes typically include a brief presentation on grant mechanisms, grant application structures and formats, and grant review processes. All students will be required to develop a research question for an application and write the Specific Aims page as part of the class. They will participate in the peer-review of the drafts of the Specific Aims drafts of the other students.
  • Learning Objectives: see below

EPID889: Responsible Conduct of Research and Scholarship Seminar

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Villamor, Eduardo Pearce, C. Leigh (Residential);
  • Last offered Fall 2016
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This seminar will cover the Responsible Conduct of Research and Scholarship (RCRS) training for all incoming EPID PhD students and other individuals who are affiliated with a training grant. The seminar will also expose students to cutting-edge epidemiologic research topics through departmental talks by experts in the field as well as provide additional professional development training. RCRS is defined by National Institutes of Health as "the practice of scientific investigation [and academia] with integrity. It involves the awareness and application of established professional norms and ethical principles in the performance of all activities related to scientific research [and academia]."

EPID890: Doctoral Seminar in Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Meza Rodriguez, Rafael (Residential);
  • Last offered Fall 2020
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Doctoral seminar to provide guidance to new doctoral candidates as they write their prospectus, and to provide opportunities to practice the presentation modalities of epidemiology through seminars, poster sessions, and oral presentations.

EPID891: Advanced Readings in Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Students will review assigned readings on the epidemiology or natural history of specific infections or chronic diseases or on host or environmental factors associated with disease, or on epidemiological methods and their application. May be elected more than once

EPID990: Dissertation Research/Pre-Candidate

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: For students who have NOT reached candidacy yet.

EPID995: Dissertation Research/Candidate

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student who has been admitted to status as a candidate

HBEHED540: Fundamentals of Reproductive Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Owens, Lauren (Residential);
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: Recommend prior human physiol course
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: The course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of reproductive health, in the USA and internationally. The course will introduce students to historical trends in the global burden of reproductive ill-health, the social ecology of reproductive risk, clinical health practice, and current controversies in policy and practice. Through a comparative look at reproductive health needs (e.g. maternal morbidity, contraceptive use, STI care and HIV-related services), in a range of diverse social settings, we will critically examine the logic and impact of current international standards for RH policy and practice.

HBEHED578: Practical Projects

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Practical projects in the application of theory and principles of Health Behavior and Health Education to individual and community-based public health settings. Course requirements include an approved practical project related to Health Behavior and Health Education in consultation with a faculty advisor. THE EXPERIENCE IS REPORTED IN AN INTEGRATIVE PAPER DEMONSTRATING THE SCIENTIFIC APPLICATION OF HBHE THEORIES AND PRINCIPLES TO THE PRACTICAL PROJECT. May be elected more than once. Enrollment limited to Health Behavior and Health Education majors with at least two full terms of prior registration.

HBEHED597: Clear Health Communication

  • Graduate level
  • Online MPH only
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for online MPH students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for online MPH students;
  • Instructor(s): Zikmund-Fisher, Brian (Online MPH);
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 501, Pubhlth 508, Pubhlth 510, Pubhlth 511, Pubhlth 512, Pubhlth 513, Pubhlth 514, and Pubhlth 515
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course covers a variety of techniques and skills that lead to clear health communications, including ways of making health data more understandable and health messages more memorable. Participants practice these skills through a series of exercises and through creation of health communication products.
  • Learning Objectives: 1) Define clear, audience-appropriate goals for a health communication 2) Identify and use features of messages to increase message memorability (i.e., stickiness) 3) Identify and provide contextual information to make health data (e.g., test results, risk statistics) more intuitively understandable and usable by different audiences 4) Evaluate to what degree health messages follow best practices such as using plain language 5) Apply principles of user-centered design and usability testing to develop and refine health messages using audience input.

HBEHED605: Human Sexuality across the Life Course

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Gamarel, Kristi (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course is designed to provide students with an introduction of the major theories and principles guiding human sexuality as well as recent developments in sexuality health research; develop their understanding of methodological and assessment issues in the study of sexuality; and familiarize them with the extent to which sexuality research and principles inform public health efforts promoting sexual health. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify and critically assess: (1) major concepts, theories and perspectives guiding a multidisciplinary understanding of human sexuality; (2) recent developments in sexuality research; (3) methodological aspects in the study of sexuality; and (4) how sexuality research informs public health practice and sexual health education strategies.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of the course, students will be able to identify and critically assess: 1. Major concepts, theories and perspectives guiding a multidisciplinary understanding of human sexuality across the life course; 2. Recent developments in sexuality research; 3. Methodological aspects in the study of sexuality; 4. How sexuality research informs public health practice and how sexual health is promoted in health education strategies.

HBEHED613: Confronting and Addressing Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Healthcare

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Patel, Minal (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Advisory Prerequisites: none
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: Reducing racial/ethnic health disparities is core to the mission of public health. This course provides an in-depth examination of racial/ethnic disparities specific to healthcare and healthcare delivery in the United States. This course will critically appraise 1) the causes of these disparities including mistrust, and differential access, communication and treatment, 2) frameworks, theory, and measurement to examine disparities in care and 3) interventions to address healthcare-specific disparities, and change behavior at multiple levels of influence (policy/regulatory, health system/delivery, healthcare provider, and patient/individual). We will examine trends and critical issues in racial/ethnic healthcare disparities before and after the seminal Institute of Medicine Report- Unequal Treatment, and the passage of the Affordable Care Act.
  • Learning Objectives: 10. Explain the social, political and economic determinants of health and how they contribute to population health and health inequities
  • Syllabus for HBEHED613

HBEHED614: Women's Health and the Timing of Reproduction

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3-4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Geronimus, Arline T (Residential);
  • Offered every other year
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Applies a systems perspective to examine the personal, social, and cultural factors that influence the age at which women initiate childbearing and the implications of these factors for the health of women and infants. Topics include teenage childbearing, Black American fertility patterns, infant mortality, ethnographic and other research methods, and related policy issues. Reviews current, historical, and cross-cultural examples. Students apply course concepts and methodologies to specific research and policy questions.

HBEHED615: Sexual Health Promotion

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Harper, Gary (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course will provide students with the background, knowledge, and experience needed to create different types of sexual health promotion interventions for diverse populations in multiple setting. Students will explore socio-ecological factors that influence the sexual health of diverse populations, and learn how to develop/implement theory-based and culturally-appropriate interventions.

HBEHED624: Needs Assessment Methods for Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Mehdipanah, Roshanak (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course will cover a mixed-methods approach to conducting needs assessments; including collection of primary data (e.g. surveys, focus groups, and interviews) and secondary data (e.g. agency, state statistics, and census). Furthermore, a global perspective will be used to study various international efforts using health equity needs assessments.

HBEHED625: Research in Health Behavior

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Inst.
  • Description: Individual work on a problem in the area of health behavior relevant to program effectiveness in public health, under the tutorial guidance of an appropriate staff member. Regular conferences are arranged to discuss research designs, proposed problem solutions, methods for data collection and analysis. The investigation is reported in a paper, which may be submitted for publication. May be elected more than once.

HBEHED633: Social Networks and Social Support in Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Caldwell, Cleo (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr. and Grad Status
  • Description: Review and analysis of theory and empirical evidence concerning social networks and social support and their relationship to health status and health behavior. Examines utilization of social networks in health education programs, e.g., family network interventions, self-help groups, "natural helpers", community organizing.

HBEHED638: Qualitative Methods in Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): King, Elizabeth (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor
  • Description: This is a course about doing qualitative social research in public health. One of its major goals is very practical and down to earth: acquiring the strategies and techniques needed to conduct qualitative research on human behavior. But the course also aspires to understand the philosophical, ethical, and political issues involved in the practice of social science within public health. The course will focus upon five phases of the research process: l) pre-research dilemmas and decisions, 2) theory and the formulation of the research question or hypothesis, 3) design, sampling, and data collection, 4) stages of data analysis, and 5) the implications of qualitative knowledge for representation of "subjects" and the expression of this knowledge in the form of written reports or publications.

HBEHED641: Materials and Methods in Health Education Programs

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Patel, Minal (Residential);
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: The goal of this course is to enable participants to select and use learning materials and methods in health education programs. The course consists of in-class sessions where various materials and media are demonstrated and their utility as enhancements to learning discussed. Technical and production aspects of materials and media are considered in several lab sessions. Students are required to produce health education materials or develop learning activities through fieldwork in addition to in-class and lab sessions.

HBEHED644: Readings in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-6 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Review of literature on selected topics in health behavior, health education or related areas under guidance of faculty member. Critical analysis; written and oral reports. May be taken more than once for a total not to exceed 6 credit hours.

HBEHED651: Program Development in Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Fleming, Paul (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: HBHE 600
  • Description: Focuses on design of effective health promotion/health education programs. Moves between theoretical bases for program development and examination of practical applications. Initial sessions focus on framework for development of health education/health promotion programs. Subsequent sessions center on specific components of intervention design and application.
Concentration Competencies that HBEHED651 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
HBHE MPH Specify approaches for planning, implementing, and managing socio-behavioral health education-focused programs and/or policies to promote human health HBEHED651
HBHE MPH Integrate principles and methods of community engagement, including ethical considerations, relevant to the design and implementation of health education programs and policies HBEHED651

HBEHED652: Group Process in Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Israel, Barbara (Residential);
  • Offered every other year
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Examines concepts, theories, and research in the field of group dynamics with particular application to health education. Emphasis on developing skills for observing, assessing, participating in, facilitating and evaluating small groups.

HBEHED653: Evidence-Informed Decision Making for 21st Century Health Care

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Veinot, Tiffany (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: At least one course in statistics
  • Description: Health consumers now have unprecedented access to health information, from published research to consumer health websites to electronic health records to peer narratives. Yet, consumers face challenges in acquiring, assessing and using health information. There is a growing need for professionals to support consumers in navigating the sea of information.
  • Learning Objectives: -Summarize, analyze and evaluate key features of a range of health sciences information sources. -Implement effective searches for health sciences information, and successfully evaluate search results. -Generate and implement training in optimal use of health information sources. -Critically appraise published health research. -Apply basic methods of research synthesis to health-related questions. -Evaluate strategies for personalizing evidence for consumers/patients.
  • This course is cross-listed with SI 653.

HBEHED654: Consumer Health Informatics

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Veinot, Tiffany Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Consumer health informatics (CHI) gives health care consumers information and tools to facilitate their engagement. Students will become familiar with, and evaluate, a range of CHI applications. They will also assess the needs and technological practices of potential users, generate theory-informed design and implementation strategies, and select appropriate evaluation approaches.
  • This course is cross-listed with SI554.

HBEHED659: Introduction to Adolescent Substance Use Prevention

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Mistry, Ritesh (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: Students gain an overview of adolescent substance use prevention from a public health perspective. Students learn about the evidence-base on adolescent substance use prevention. They apply course content to create prevention interventions. The course examines both illicit (e.g., opiates, marijuana, methamphetamine) and licit (e.g., alcohol, tobacco) substances.
  • Learning Objectives: -Understand the magnitude of and trends in adolescent substance use in the US and globally. -Describe which adolescent populations are at greatest risk of substance use and its consequences. -Describe the consequences of adolescent substance use on adolescent health and development. -Understand and critically appraise the main theoretical perspectives that are used to explain what determines adolescent substance use, and progression in to abuse. -Articulate the empirical evidence about the determinants of adolescent substance use. -Identify and appraise existing programs and policies designed to prevent adolescent substance use. -Apply the above to develop a new or adapt an existing evidence-based program or policy to prevent adolescent substance use.

HBEHED660: Theory, Research and Practice in Adolescent Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Caldwell, Cleo (Residential);
  • Offered every other year
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Description: Examines educational efforts designed to promote better health outcomes among adolescents. Review developmental theories, research, and interventions to promote health in this population. Addresses various contexts for intervention programs and their implications. Topics covered include, but are not limited to, the effects of peer and family influences on health, resiliency, violence, alcohol and drug use, and sexual behavior.

HBEHED661: Designing Sticky Communications for Health Advocacy, Education, and Mass Media

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Zikmund-Fisher, Brian (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This class focuses on broadly applicable message design principles that help health education and promotion messages to "stick" in recipients' minds. In addition to deconstructing memorable messages at a basic level, we will also consider the potential uses (and misuses) of first person narratives.

HBEHED665: Mobile Health: Text messaging, apps, and other mobile communication strategies to prevent disease and assist people living with chronic illnesses

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Piette, John (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: N/A
  • Description: The overall goal of this course is to give students the knowledge, skills and experience they need to participate in decision-making about developing, implementing, and continuing mHealth services addressing major public health and healthcare challenges.

HBEHED669: Genetics, Health Behavior, and Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Roberts, Scott (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: SPH student or permission of instructor
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course addresses the following topics: genetics and risk communication; ethical issues in genetics research; the psychological and behavioral impact of genetic testing; public and professional knowledge and attitudes about genetics; health education needs in genetics; and emerging issues in the field (e.g., computerized delivery of genetic counseling services).
  • Syllabus for HBEHED669

HBEHED671: Motivational Interviewing in Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Resnicow, Ken (Residential);
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: HBEHED600, Perm Instr.
  • Description: In the past few years, there has been increased interest in using motivational interviewing (MI) in public health and medical settings. Originally developed for the treatment of addictive behaviors, MI has recently been used to address chronic disease and other public health conditions, such as smoking, diet, physical activity, diabetes management, and medical adherence. At its core, MI is a method for assisting individuals to work through their ambivalence about behavior change. Deeply rooted in the person-centered philosophy of Carl Rogers, MI counselors are trained to rely heavily on reflective listening, more so than direct questioning, persuasion, or provision of advice. This course will provide participants with an in-depth overview of MI and provide opportunities to practice the core techniques.
  • Syllabus for HBEHED671

HBEHED677: Health Impacts Of Law Enforcement In The U.S.

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Lopez, William (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Advisory Prerequisites: none
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course draws on social-ecological model to consider the health impacts of law enforcement on individuals, families and communities and how state violence is shaped by anti-Black, -Latino, and -Arab racism. Data, books, and media will catalyze discussion and analysis of how law enforcement impacts communities throughout the U.S.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of this course, students will have been exposed to the following Foundational Learning Objectives: -Objective4: List major causes and trends of morbidity and mortality in the US or other community relevant to the school or program -Objective10: Explain the social, political, and economic determinants of health and how they contribute to population health and health inequities

HBEHED693: Seminar on Health and Poverty

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Geronimus, Arline T (Residential);
  • Offered every other year
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Explores dimensions of poverty in terms of the interrelationships of socioeconomic status, racism, minority status and health. The focus is on the United States and topics discussed include different conceptualizations of and perspectives on the relationship of poverty to health, issues in child and family health, in urban and rural poverty and health, and issues relevant to improving health services and health policy targeted at socioeconomically disvantanged populations.

HBEHED710: Special MPH Topics in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-6 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Kostanecki, Eileen King, Elizabeth Heinze, Justin Amico, K. Rivet (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: Master's level seminar designed to provide an extensive review of a number of substantive and methods and skill areas in health behavior and health education. Readings, discussion and assignments are organized around issues of mutual interest to faculty and students. Reviews and reports on topics required in the areas selected. May be elected more than once.

HBEHED715: Ethical, Legal, & Social Issues in Genomics and Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1.5 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Roberts, Scott (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
  • Advisory Prerequisites: Prior experience with ethical, legal, and social issues raised by genomics
  • Description: Genetics and genomics research are rapidly generating scientific discoveries, technological advances, and clinical applications, each with important implications for medicine and public health. In order for the promise of the "genomics revolution" to be achieved, however, numerous ethical, legal and social implications (ELSI) will need to be addressed. This weekly seminar will address a wide range of ELSI issues involved in the following areas: implementation of genetic screening and testing in medical, public health and direct-to-consumer contexts; ethics of genetics research, including challenges around informed consent, data privacy, and return of individual research results; and legal and policy options for the regulation of genetic testing, genomic research, and precision medicine.
  • Learning Objectives: 1) Gain awareness of and appreciation for a variety of ethical, legal, and social issues raised by developments in genomic science; 2) Learn about methodological skills involved in the conduct of ELSI research and communication about genomics research and applications; and 3) Enhance professional development through written and oral assignments, critical review of scientific literature, and networking with faculty and peers with mutual interests in genomics and ELSI issues.

HBEHED885: Health Education Models of Practice and Interventions at the Community Level

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Israel, Barbara (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: HBHE doctoral students
  • Description: The course is designed as a doctoral seminar for HBHE doctoral students. The course will examine and critique current models of health education and behavior change which intervene at the community level to bring about behavior change which intervene at the community level to bring about behavior change. The focus will be on recognized health education interventions/strategies. Major topics will include: 1) methods for behavior change (i.e., community organizing; mass media, etc.); 2) policy activities; 3) organizational change activities; 4) advocacy activities; 5) community planning models. This course will also be available to second year HBHE masters students on a permission of instructor basis.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of this course students will be able to: 1. Identify and discuss various strategies and models of health education/health promotion interventions at other than the individual level. 2. Discuss and critique the theory, conceptual frameworks and constructs that serve as the basis of these models. 3. Articulate and critique assumptions underlying these models. 4. Apply these models and constructs to current public health problems. 5. Identify and discuss current evaluation strategies and challenges pertinent to these models. me as 685.
Concentration Competencies that HBEHED885 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
HBHE PhD Develop an innovative and efficient design for an empirical analysis of an intervention or observational study to address a research question with clear public health relevance HBEHED885, HBEHED886, preliminary exam
HBHE PhD Integrate theoretical frameworks (e.g., health belief model, social ecological model) with critical analysis of empirical data to identify gaps in current approaches to health promotion HBEHED885, HBEHED886, preliminary exam

HBEHED886: Theory-Driven Interventions Targeting Individual Behavior Change

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Gamarel, Kristi (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: HBHE doctoral students or Perm Instr
  • Description: The course will involve in-depth discussions of issues and problems in using conceptual models, theories of health behavior, and data to inform interventions targeting individual behavior change. Presentations will focus on the rationale for selection of a particular theory or theories, conceptual framework, how the theory or model was used to develop the intervention, measurement of theoretical constructs, and the barriers encountered in the implementation and evaluation phase of the research. Intervention research will include those that target clients, providers and families.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Describe the role of conceptual models and theories for informing interventions that promote individual behavior change. 2. Discuss the relative utility of various models and theories dependent on the research question and target audience. 3. Articulate the difficulties and limitations of health decision-making models in providing direction in intervention research. 4. Develop and defend a conceptual model using behavioral, social science, and health education theories/constructs to inform an intervention relevant to a current health problem. 5. Discuss current directions in research involving theory and practice.
Concentration Competencies that HBEHED886 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
HBHE PhD Develop an innovative and efficient design for an empirical analysis of an intervention or observational study to address a research question with clear public health relevance HBEHED885, HBEHED886, preliminary exam
HBHE PhD Integrate theoretical frameworks (e.g., health belief model, social ecological model) with critical analysis of empirical data to identify gaps in current approaches to health promotion HBEHED885, HBEHED886, preliminary exam

HBEHED900: Research in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 2-6 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Research work undertaken by doctoral students in collaboration with faculty advisers, including participation in on-going departmental research activities. Open only to doctoral students in Health Behavior and Health Education. May be elected more than once.

HBEHED990: Dissertation/Pre-Candidate

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Half Term (IIIA or IIIB, 1-4 credits) Election for dissertation work by doctoral students in Health Behavior and Health Education who are not yet admitted to status as a candidate.

HBEHED995: Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Half Term (IIIA or IIIB, 1-4 credits) Election for dissertation work by doctoral students admitted to status as candidate.

HMP542: Cost Utility Analysis and Clinical Research

  • Graduate level
  • Executive Masters
  • Winter term(s) for Executive Masters students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for Executive Masters students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Prerequisites: Enrollment in OJOC/CRDSA Program
  • Description: Economic issues and analytical techniques relevant to the performance and evaluation of clinical research are investigated. Special emphasis is placed on the theory, practice, usefulness and limitations of cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis.
  • Syllabus for HMP542
Concentration Competencies that HMP542 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
BIOSTAT Clinical Research Design and Statistical Analysis MS Address ethical and cost-utility issues in clinical research, including the psychosocial aspects of data sciences and the need to ensure validity of the data and analyses HMP542, HBEHED531, HMP540

HMP553: Data Management in Health Care

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Mendez, David Ladhania, Rahul (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course introduces the students to the use of spreadsheets and relational databases for decision-making. It covers data manipulation and analysis, formatting and charting using Microsoft Excel; as well as design and implementation of, and data retrieval from, small-to-medium relational database systems using Microsoft Access.
  • Syllabus for HMP553

HMP601: Healthcare Quality, Performance Measurement and Improvement

  • Graduate level
  • Both Executive Masters and Residential
  • Winter term(s) for Executive Masters and residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for Executive Masters and residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Ryan, Andrew (Residential/Executive Masters);
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: HMP 600
  • Description: HMP 601, building on the material in HMP 600, focuses on: the definition and assessment of quality of care; control of quality and costs of care through market-oriented strategies, professional self-regulation, intra-organizational process improvement approaches, third-party strategies, and government regulation; and system reform.

HMP603: Organization and Management of Healthcare Systems

  • Graduate level
  • Executive Masters, Residential and Online MPH
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for Executive Masters and residential students; Fall term(s) for online MPH students;
  • 2-3 credit hour(s) for Executive Masters and residential students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MPH students;
  • Instructor(s): Stead, Christine Rubyan, Michael (Residential/Executive Masters); Rubyan, Michael (Online MPH);
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: HMP Masters Standing or Perm Instr
  • Description: Focuses on servant and transformational leadership from the perspective of buyers, insurers, policy makers and leaders of nonprofit health organizations to understand how to deliver high quality, cost effective health care and reach and implement decisions about future activities and the best managerial practices for non-profit advocacy and community-based organizations.
  • Residential Syllabus for HMP603
Concentration Competencies that HMP603 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
HMP MPH Develop strategies to continually improve the long-term success and viability of an organization, based on an analysis of the business, demographic, ethno-cultural, political, and regulatory implications of decisions HMP603, HMP604

HMP606: Managerial Accounting for Health Care Administrators

  • Graduate level
  • Executive Masters, Residential and Online MPH
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for Executive Masters and residential students; Winter term(s) for online MPH students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for Executive Masters and residential students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MPH students;
  • Instructor(s): Singh, Simone (Residential/Executive Masters); Singh, Simone (Online MPH);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: HMP 608 and HMP 660 (residential students only)
  • Description: Concepts and techniques of managerial accounting for generalist health care administrators. Topics covered include full cost measurement, differential cost measurement and analysis, sources of revenue, price setting, budgeting and control, costs and decision-making fund accounting
  • Residential Syllabus for HMP606

HMP609: Special Topics in Corporate Finance

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Grazier, Kyle (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Financial accounting course or knowledge
  • Description: Introduction to finance ratios, forecasting methods, capital structure theory, and risk-return analysis. Case-based application of these concepts using several different approaches to valuing a business. Exercises to determine the value of the investment, analyze current financial conditions, and forecast performance based on different variables are utilized.

HMP619: Health and the Public Policy Process

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Jarman, Holly (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: HMP615
  • Description: This course analyzes the US policy process in relation to US healthcare and public health systems. We explore how conditions within society are framed as problems, how problems are placed on political agendas, how problems get matched with potential solutions, and pay attention to the challenges of implementation and evaluation.
  • Learning Objectives: Upon completing the class, students will be able to understand the public policy process as it relates to US healthcare and public health systems, and apply that understanding to: -Identify a range of policy alternatives in response to a perceived problem in the healthcare or public health system; -Evaluate policy alternatives using evidence; -Recommend actions based on the evaluation of policy alternatives, and; -Create strategies to communicate and promote a given policy alternative.

HMP620: Professional Development

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Killaly, Catherine (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course is designed for HMP students to synthesize, integrate learning and to foster professional development and lifelong learning habits.
  • Syllabus for HMP620
Concentration Competencies that HMP620 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
HMP MPH Build a professional network to cultivate the ability to work with others as future health managers and policy makers HMP620

HMP622: Qualitative Methods for Health Policy Research

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Jarman, Holly (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: During the course, students will gain experience in creating a research plan, conducting interviews, analyzing interview data, and presenting their qualitative findings to an audience.
  • Syllabus for HMP622

HMP624: Health Policy Challenges in Developing Countries

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Maffioli, Elisa (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Graduate standing required.
  • Description: HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and diarrheal disease are the four biggest contributors to the burden of disease in sub-Saharan Africa and represent a serious constraint on economic growth. They kill nearly 4 million African adults and children annually. Readings from the public health, economic and medical literature will focus on the main debates surrounding policy interventions to combat these diseases. The class will examine and evaluate the evidence on the nature of these diseases and the effectiveness of current interventions in Africa and other parts of the developing world. Through class discussion, small group exercises and writing assignments, students will hone their skills in policy and economic analysis. For the final project, students will develop policy recommendations for governments of developing countries on a global health issue of their choice.
  • Learning Objectives: At the completion of this course, students will be expected to: 1. Become familiar with sources of evidence on the effectiveness and appropriateness of policy interventions. 2. Be able to discern reliable sources of evidence and identify limitations of the evidence. 3. Develop skills in using economic concepts to support specific policy interventions. 4. Develop skills in determining appropriate health policy interventions. 5. Develop skills in articulating and advocating policy positions through written submissions and in-class discussion.
  • Syllabus for HMP624

HMP626: Culture And Health Policy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Creary, Melissa (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Graduate Standing
  • Description: Exploration of the normative values assigned to concepts of culture and disease that influence social beliefs, health status, and creation of policy in the US. Social determinants of health disparities, development and governance of disease, the role of states and social movements in the development of health policy are examined.
  • Syllabus for HMP626

HMP629: Employer-Provided Health Benefits

  • Graduate level
  • Executive Masters
  • Winter term(s) for Executive Masters students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for Executive Masters students;
  • Instructor(s): Bechel-Marriott, Diane (Executive Masters);
  • Prerequisites: HMP 600 and 601 or 602
  • Description: This survey and applied policy analysis class will provide students with an understanding of dynamics and key trends in employer-provided health care benefits. In addition to an overview of the topic, three areas merit special focus. First, pharmaceutical design will be explored. Though increasing technological innovation has brought a continuous cycle of new products to market, the lack of comprehensive effectiveness studies makes it difficult to ascertain optimal benefit. Interesting voluntary efforts will be highlighted that may lay a cornerstone for greater value. A second issue covered will be retiree benefit design. An aging population, stricter financial reporting requirements, and increased costs have prompted new ways to manage post-retirement health obligations. Several models, including Health Reimbursement Arrangements, Voluntary Employee Benefit Associations, and access-only platforms will be discussed. Finally, the important role of employer and community coalitions in better aligning incentives among patients, providers and employers will be explored. The focus of this seminar style course is on developing the knowledge, skills and methods necessary to better interact with employer groups. In-class work will involve class lectures, discussions, readings, speakers, activities, and assignments.

HMP631: Health Insurance and Payment Systems

  • Graduate level
  • Both Executive Masters and Residential
  • Winter term(s) for Executive Masters and residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for Executive Masters and residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Grazier, Kyle (Residential/Executive Masters);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: HMP 600, HMP 602, HMP 606, HMP 661 or Perm Instr
  • Description: This course examines the conceptual and management frameworks for financing health care services through insurance, contracting and managed care. It analyzes past and current research on the formulation of payment techniques and the impact of reimbursement methods on consumers, providers, payers and society.
  • Syllabus for HMP631

HMP633: Health Insurance in America. How Did We Get Into This Mess? How Do We Get Out?

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Udow-Phillips, Marianne (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: HMP 600
  • Description: This course explores the history, structure and likely future trends of health insurance in the U.S. The course includes policy analyses of health insurance related issues focusing on potential solution alternatives to political and practical problems. It provides in depth overview of basic features of private and public health insurance.
  • Syllabus for HMP633

HMP635: Case Analysis & Competition Presentation

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: HMP 600, HMP 615
  • Description: This class is designed for students willing to represent the department at the next NAHSE intercollegiate team competition. The course will develop skills at analyzing strategically oriented cases in healthcare management. In addition, students learn presentation skills in a supportive environment with feedback from peers, faculty and alumni. Students selected to compete at NAHSE and other students selected based on performance in the initial term will be invited to be facilitators in the following winter term.

HMP638: Measuring and Monitoring Population Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: .
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course is an introduction to the measurement and monitoring of population health. Fundamentals of measuring population health including the measurement of life expectancy, healthy life expectancy, infant and maternal mortality, fertility, reproductive, and contraceptive measures, and the population attributable risk fraction will be covered.

HMP640: Program Evaluation in Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Smith, Shawna (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: grad status
  • Description: The Purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the fundamentals of evaluation and research as applied to public health programs, policies and other types of interventions. The course covers impact, outcomes, process and participatory evaluation, and a number of research designs common in public health evaluation research, Students will gain skills in framing evaluation questions. In addition, students will gain skills needed to understand and critique published evaluation literature, and skills in measurement/data collection strategies. Class format includes lecture, discussion articles, and small group exercises. For final project, students will design and write and evaluation plan in the format of a proposal for funding.
  • Syllabus for HMP640

HMP642: Management Implications Of Health Equity

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Dotson, Ebbin (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: HMP 600
  • Description: This course redefines working knowledge of health disparities through a health equity lens to explore the implications of managerial solutions as they pertain to healthcare organizations. It uses systematic, clinical, and social issues of origin to both explain and try to resolve management’s role in addressing health equity.
  • Learning Objectives: Explore many of the fundamental managerial and social arguments that are used in explaining the concepts of health disparities and health equity Contextualize the history of race, ethnicity, and social class as we try to uncover a better explanation of disparate health for the various populations in the US Identify the multicultural underpinnings of increasing health equity Inform and prepare practitioners to be part of the solution to eliminate health disparities and increase investments in health equity

HMP643: Managing People in Health Organizations

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Dotson, Ebbin (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: grad status
  • Description: This course provides the knowledge and skills for understanding and effectively managing individuals and groups within health care organizations. We consider a wide variety of motivations that draw individuals to their jobs and keep them productive. We also consider why organizations form small groups and the dynamics of these groups over time. Students learn techniques for persuasive communication and conflict management, develop strategies for dealing with interpersonal problems in an organizational setting, and processes for handling work teams. Common organizational problems that students solve include choosing the right person through the hiring process, evaluating employee performance, and negotiating contracts.
  • Syllabus for HMP643

HMP646: Leadership Development

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Killaly, Catherine
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Reviews theoretical foundations and models of leadership. Fosters students' insight into their leadership potential, experiences, and skills. Uses self-assessment exercises, guest speakers, role-plays, and other activities to stimulate student learning. Students are expected to have developed their own comprehensive leadership and career development plan by the end of the course.

HMP649: Critical Policy Issues in Health IT

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Anthony, Denise (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course uses a policy analysis lens to critically examine issues related to the use of IT in healthcare. It will examine key policies in three areas: clinical informatics, consumer informatics, and population health informatics. The primary focus will be on the U.S. but international approaches will also be discussed.
  • This course is cross-listed with SI654.

HMP653: Law and Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: The purposes of this course are to examine the legal context of the relationship between the individual and the community, and to understand public health regulation in the context of a market-driven system. The goals of the course are for students to understand generally: constitutional authority and limits on governmental intervention in public health (i.e., individual rights vs. society's rights); the functions of and interactions between courts, legislatures, and regulators; how law will affect students as strategic thinkers in public health positions; how to recognize legal issues and communicate with attorneys; and the process of public health regulation and potential legal barriers to public health intervention strategies. Specific topics will vary, but will usually include: the nature and scope of public health authority; constitutional constraints on public health initiatives; tobacco control; youth violence; injury prevention; the spread of communicable disease; and regulating environmental risk. This class can be taken as an elective, in fulfillment of the law/politics requirement, or as a BIC requirement.
  • Syllabus for HMP653

HMP655: Decision Making Models in Health Care

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Mendez, David Hutton, David (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: HMP654
  • Description: Application of computer models for decision making in the health care sector. The students will be exposed to Monte Carlo Simulation, Process Simulation, Multiple Regression analysis, Discriminant Analysis, Project Management, Inventory Control, Integer Linear Programming, and Multi-Criteria Optimization. Use of computers and spreadsheet modeling will be emphasized throughout the class.
  • Syllabus for HMP655

HMP662: The Economics of Health Management and Policy

  • Graduate level
  • Executive Masters
  • Winter term(s) for Executive Masters students;
  • 4 credit hour(s) for Executive Masters students;
  • Instructor(s): Hirth, Richard Maffioli, Elisa (Executive Masters);
  • Prerequisites: Enrollment in the HMP Executive Masters program
  • Description: HMP 662 will introduce students to economic analysis through general microeconomic theory of consumer and producer behavior. This general theory will then be applied to a variety of health and health care topics, including health insurance, health behaviors, and markets for healthcare services.
  • Syllabus for HMP662

HMP663: Introduction to Economic Evaluation using Cost-Effectiveness

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Maffioli, Elisa (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: HMP 600 and HMP 660
  • Description: Survey course using cost-effectiveness tools to inform decisions about improving health. Analytical tools such as cost benefit analysis, decision analysis, and sensitivity analysis are utilized. Students will learn theoretical justifications for these tools as well as their limitations.
  • Syllabus for HMP663

HMP669: Data Management And Visualization In Healthcare

  • Graduate level
  • Both Residential and Online MPH
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for residential students; Winter term(s) for online MPH students;
  • 1.5-3 credit hour(s) for residential students; 3 credit hour(s) for online MPH students;
  • Instructor(s): Ladhania, Rahul (Residential); Ladhania, Rahul (Online MPH);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: Graduate Standing
  • Description: This course is an introduction to the use of relational databases and data visualization tools for decision-making. It covers: A. design and implementation of, and data retrieval from, small-to-medium relational database systems using Microsoft Access; and B. data manipulation, analysis and visualization using the R programming language.
  • Residential Syllabus for HMP669

HMP671: Cross-national Comparisons of Aging and Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Liang, Jersey (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course examines aging and health within a global context. The focus will be placed primarily on old age support systems in the United States and several other developed nations (e.g., Canada, Germany, Japan, and United Kingdom). Specifically, comparisons across these nations will be made in: (a) population aging and health, (b) acute care, (c) long-term care, and (d) family-based support, and (e) financial security in old age. Population aging and health in developing nations (e.g., China, India) will be reviewed in light of the lessons learned in the developed countries.

HMP672: Population health in China

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course aims to provide an overview of population health and related policy issues in China. It consists of three main sections: (a) population and development, (b) burden of disease, and (c) health care financing and delivery.

HMP673: Health Program Management and Evaluation in Resource Poor Countries

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: EPID554
  • Description: This course will introduce future leaders to the skills and techniques required in order to become effective program managers of health projects in resource poor countries. The course covers a diverse set of topics within the context of health programs in resource poor countries that include: project and process management; project sustainability and quality assurance; proposal/grant writing; human resource management; project and process management software and technology; and financial budget development and monitoring. Each session of two hours will consist of a one hour seminar followed by one hour of practical exercises through group discussion and application of skills/techniques to real world scenarios. The course will primarily rely on case study analysis, readings from a variety of management, global health other social science journals and personal experiences of invited SPH faculty/guest speakers.
  • Learning Objectives: Students will have an understanding of the language and application of program management and evaluation tools/techniques to health programs in resource poor countries. Students will also appreciate the challenges of health program management in resource poor countries and how to identify appropriate tools/techniques to mitigate them through interactive exercises and hands-on applications. Other learning objectives are: 1) develop and enhance professional skills in program design, program monitoring and evaluation and resource allocation; 2) acquire the confidence, knowledge and skills needed to become effective program managers in global health practice; 3) equip students with the skills that are necessary to work effectively as a team member or team leader/facilitator; and 4) enable students to design, manage and evaluate health programs in resource poor countries.

HMP674: The Economics of Health Management and Policy II

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Norton, Edward Maffioli, Elisa (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: HMP 660
  • Description: The focus of the course is on how the demand for and supply of health care services interact to yield market outcomes (prices and quantities) in health and health care. The purpose of the course is to give students experience analyzing health management and health policy issues using economic tools.
  • Syllabus for HMP674

HMP676: Introduction To Health Informatics

  • Graduate level
  • Executive Masters
  • Winter term(s) for Executive Masters students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for Executive Masters students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Executive Masters);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Health informatics applies to a wide range of health-related application domains a set of methods to create and study information resources intended to improve individual to population health. The course explores the domains of clinical informatics, consumer health informatics, and public health informatics.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Describe challenges currently faced by individuals seeking to improve health using information resources in each of four application domains presented in the course, Clinical, Consumer Health, Public Health, and Biomedical Research. 2. Articulate what is required to develop and deploy health information resources that are truly assistive and helpful for their direct and indirect users, including the phases of developing proposals, developing implementations, and managing operations along with the necessary organizational change management methods. 3. Explain how and why the key methods, such as standards development, natural language processing, image processing, etc., used in health informatics are essential to creating information resources that have the potential to improve health. 4. Describe the components of a computing system’s architecture and how those components support the storage, manipulation, transformation, and use of health data. 5. Effectively link or connect the four concepts of infrastructure, health information exchange, interoperability, and standards in a manner that helps explain how these concepts interrelate to enable potentially improved health information resources. 6. Read and assess health informatics literature critically. 7. Assess key stakeholders and describe the implications of health informatics adoption for each stakeholder. 8. Be able to concisely explain confusing or challenging health informatics concepts (including policies, evaluation methods, and technical approaches) through your own writing and be able to argue for or against others’ positions about health informatics topics in your own words. 9. Describe, with depth of understanding and in detail, what health informatics is and is not, or what health informatics entails and does not entail, for an expert audience and also for an audience unfamiliar with the field.
  • Syllabus for HMP676

HMP677: Health Care Organization: An International Perspective

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Liang, Jersey (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Description: Course examines health care systems in approximately eight developed and developing nations (e.g., United States, Germany, Japan, Canada, United Kingdom, China, Mexico, and Kenya). Comparisons made in: population health, health care financing and control,health professionals and their patients, health care organization, and health system performance and reform strategies.

HMP680: Special Topics in Health Management and Policy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: Lecture, seminars and readings selected on a current or emerging topic or theme in health, management and policy. The specific material and format will vary by semester and instructor.

HMP681: Special Topics in Health Management and Policy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Dotson, Ebbin Creary, Melissa Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Lecture, seminars and readings selected on a current or emerging topic or theme in health, management and policy. The specific material and format will vary by semester and instructor.
  • Learning Objectives: Will vary by topic and instructor.

HMP682: Integrated Learning Experience in Health Management and Policy

  • Graduate level
  • Both Executive Masters and Residential
  • Winter term(s) for Executive Masters and residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for Executive Masters and residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Comstock, Matthew La Jeunesse, Christine (Residential/Executive Masters);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: Second year HMP masters candidate or Perm Instr
  • Description: Capstone experience for all 2nd year HMP students that blends theory and practice beyond classroom problem-solving. Students utilize the skills and competencies developed during other courses to solve an actual problem or question within an organization.
  • This course is cross-listed with .
  • Syllabus for HMP682

HMP685: The politics of Public Health Policy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Jarman, Holly Greer, Scott (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Grad Standing
  • Description: Policy requires politics: behind every positive or negative decision governments make, there are elected politicians, politically skilled officials, journalists, and other stakeholders. Understanding the world of politics is crucial to influencing and implementing policies for public health. Indeed, it is impossible to understand public health policy outside of its political context. This class presents the basic institutions and politics of contemporary public health policymaking through studies of institutions and contemporary policy debates. Through analysis of case studies including obesity, state health plans, smoking and pharmaceutical regulation, students will explore the influence of politics on the definitions and decisions of public health issues. They will leave the class with an understanding of how politics explains current public health policymaking debates and an improved ability to understand the politics of major public health policy issues. This class can be taken as an elective, as a BIC requirement, or in fulfillment of the HMP law/politics requirement.
  • Syllabus for HMP685

HMP687: Health Care Negotiation

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Changes in health care require collaboration between disciplines and professionals. Negotiation, a fundamental of organized behavior, is especially challenging in health care because of the large number of stakeholders and the sensitivity around care itself. Conflict management can be achieved through the use of negotiating techniques, with significant economic savings.

HMP690: Readings in Health Management and Policy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status and Perm Instr
  • Description: Directed readings or research on selected topics and problems relevant to health management and policy. May be elected more than once.

HMP803: Doctoral Seminar in Health Services and Systems Research I

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Anthony, Denise (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: The health services research module will provide an introduction to the philosophy, history, and approaches of health services research and a sample of research topics that have been approached by health services systems researchers.
  • Learning Objectives: Students should gain a better understanding of the content of the field of health services research and the diverse approaches and uses of this research.
Concentration Competencies that HMP803 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
HMP Health Services Organization and Policy PhD Critically evaluate the prior literature in health services organization and policy, including motivation, theory, data quality, methods, results, conclusions, and policy recommendations HMP802, HMP803, HMP804, HMP805, HMP806, HMP835
HMP Health Services Organization and Policy PhD Develop research questions grounded in theory to expand knowledge about health services organization and policy HMP802, HMP803, HMP804, HMP805, HMP806, HMP835

HMP806: Doctoral Seminar in Health Services and Systems Research IV

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Hirth, Richard (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter, 2018
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: The economics module will provide an introduction to economic reasoning and methods and a sample of research topics that have been approached by economists working on health and health care. Readings will be a mix of classic papers and recent papers that illustrate this approach yet are accessible to both economists and students training in other disciplines.
  • Learning Objectives: Students should gain a better understanding of the role economics has played in health services research and public health and be able to identify how the approaches and questions addressed by economists compare to those taken by researchers specializing in other social science disciplines.
  • Syllabus for HMP806
Concentration Competencies that HMP806 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
HMP Health Services Organization and Policy PhD Critically evaluate the prior literature in health services organization and policy, including motivation, theory, data quality, methods, results, conclusions, and policy recommendations HMP802, HMP803, HMP804, HMP805, HMP806, HMP835
HMP Health Services Organization and Policy PhD Develop research questions grounded in theory to expand knowledge about health services organization and policy HMP802, HMP803, HMP804, HMP805, HMP806, HMP835

HMP809: Logic and Methods of Medical Care Research(Psych 809)

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Jarman, Holly (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Principles of the scientific method and the logic of the research process. The logic and methodologies of problem formulation, development of hypotheses and objectives, research design, sampling, operationalism and measurement, coding and analysis strategies. Primarily for doctoral students in Health Services Organization and Policy.
Concentration Competencies that HMP809 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
HMP Health Services Organization and Policy PhD Create a rigorous study design to test the research questions posed and to understand the strengths and limitations of that study design HMP826, HMP809, HMP835, HMP809

HMP815: Readings in Medical Care

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Perm Instr
  • Description: Directed readings in special areas. May be elected more than once. Primarily for doctoral students in Health Services Organization and Policy.

HMP826: Applied Econometrics in Health Services Research

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Norton, Edward (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Econ571 or equivalent
  • Description: Application of advanced econometric methods to health services research. Focuses on categorical data analysis, simultaneous equations, nonlinear expenditure models, duration models, and specification tests. Students will apply these techniques in weekly problems sets and an empirical term paper.
  • Syllabus for HMP826
Concentration Competencies that HMP826 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
HMP Health Services Organization and Policy PhD Create a rigorous study design to test the research questions posed and to understand the strengths and limitations of that study design HMP826, HMP809, HMP835, HMP809
HMP Health Services Organization and Policy PhD Apply advanced quantitative and/or qualitative methods appropriate for health services organization and policy research appropriately in one's own research HMP826, HMP835
HMP Health Services Organization and Policy PhD Disseminate rigorous research findings through clear, persuasive written and oral communication to both peers and non-technical audiences. HMP826, HMP835

HMP833: Research Topics in Sociology and Health Care Organization

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: HMP doctoral students or P.I.
  • Description: HSOP Program requirements. A topic in sociology and health care organization-policy is selected each term for detailed critical, theoretical, and methodological analysis leading to development, in class, of propositions aimed at advancing scientific status of the area of inquiry. Analysis and development of content follows logic of the research paradigm. Required of students with a sociology cognate in the doctoral program in Health Services Organization and Policy

HMP835: Research Practicum

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 3-6 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: HMP 809, Perm Instr
  • Description: The purpose of this course is to allow each student, early in his or her doctoral career, to gain experience in the actual performance of health services research. The experience will enable students to build sound research skills and to gain knowledge of the nature of inquiry in their discipline as well as in the field of health services research. Each student in the HSOP program is expected to elect a total of 6 credits in HMP 835.
Concentration Competencies that HMP835 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
HMP Health Services Organization and Policy PhD Critically evaluate the prior literature in health services organization and policy, including motivation, theory, data quality, methods, results, conclusions, and policy recommendations HMP802, HMP803, HMP804, HMP805, HMP806, HMP835
HMP Health Services Organization and Policy PhD Develop research questions grounded in theory to expand knowledge about health services organization and policy HMP802, HMP803, HMP804, HMP805, HMP806, HMP835
HMP Health Services Organization and Policy PhD Create a rigorous study design to test the research questions posed and to understand the strengths and limitations of that study design HMP826, HMP809, HMP835, HMP809
HMP Health Services Organization and Policy PhD Apply advanced quantitative and/or qualitative methods appropriate for health services organization and policy research appropriately in one's own research HMP826, HMP835
HMP Health Services Organization and Policy PhD Disseminate rigorous research findings through clear, persuasive written and oral communication to both peers and non-technical audiences. HMP826, HMP835

HMP990: Dissertation/Precandidates

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to status as candidate.

HMP995: Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students admitted as candidates

NUTR510: Nutrition in the Life Cycle

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Olivia (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Introductory biology and introductory chemistry
  • Description: Nutrition in the Life Cycle will cover nutritional needs of individuals during critical stages of development. Students will learn about the biological basis for nutritional requirements in normal development and maintaining health in adulthood. Consequences of over- and under-nutrition and how to identify and address these issues will be discussed.
  • This course is cross-listed with PUBHLTH310.

NUTR518: Food Literacy for All

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Leung, Cindy (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course offers a unique opportunity for students to gain an interdisciplinary overview of crises and opportunities in today's food system through a weekly lecture series bringing high-profile speakers to campus from diverse sectors: academia, grassroots movements, public health, farming, and more. Designed as an academic-community partnership, the course is led by a UM faculty member (Leung) with a leader in food justice in Detroit (Hebron), along with the program manager of the UM Sustainable Food Systems Initiative (Shapiro).
  • Learning Objectives: 1) Describe the term "food system" and influencing factors 2) Discuss how food systems impact public and environmental health 3) Describe strategies to promote health equity within local and national food systems 4) Propose opportunities for improving the food system and the social and environmental levels
  • This course is cross-listed with EAS 639 ENVIRON 314 PUBHLTH 318 (pending) in the SEAS, LSA Program in the Environment, SPH department.

NUTR540: Maternal and Child Nutrition

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Cole, Suzanne (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the nutritional requirements of pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Main topics include: physiologic and metabolic adaptations of pregnancy and lactation, maternal nutrition during pregnancy and lactation, composition of human milk and formula, feeding practices of infants and toddlers, and the nutrient requirements of infants, children, and adolescents. At the conclusion of this course, students will have gained a sufficient foundation in maternal and child nutrition to better understand the relevant scientific literature. Didactic lectures and guest presentations accompanied by class discussions will provide a breadth of maternal and child nutrition knowledge.

NUTR563: Transformative Food Systems

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1.5 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Jones, Andrew (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Transformative Food Systems (TFS) Fellow or instructor permission.
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This experientially-based course will build students’ equity competency – the knowledge, skills and values needed to recognize and address historical, structural inequities that pervade today’s food systems. The goal is to prepare reflective, visionary and strategic food systems leaders who use systems thinking, collaboration, and an ethics of justice.
  • Learning Objectives: 1) Examine diverse strategies for overcoming inequities, health challenges and environmental crises facing food systems across various dimensions, scales, and geographies, 2) Explore diverse career pathways for catalyzing food systems change, and 3) Reflect on how personal identities, values, implicit biases, and leadership styles shape efforts to transform food systems, 4) Practice interpersonal, communication and leadership skills needed for collective action.

NUTR578: Practical Projects

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Practical Projects is the application of theory and principles of Nutritional Sciences to individual community-based public health settings. Course requirements include an approved practical project related to Nutritional Sciences in consultation with a faculty advisor. The experience is documented in an integrative paper demonstrating the scientific application of NS theories and principles to the practical project. May be elected more than once. Enrollment is limited to NS students with at least two full terms completed prior to registration.

NUTR585: Food Service Management

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Ramos, Patti (Residential);
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: Grad status
  • Description: This course examines the principles of food systems management, defing and applying management theories and functions in food and nutrition settings. Human, material and facility management will be discussed. Students gain an understanding of the tools available for managing effective and efficient food and nutrition organizations. Purchasing and inventory techniques will be examined. Using the foodservice systems model as a guide, it shows students how to transform the human, material, facility and operational inputs of the system into outputs of meals, customer satisfaction, employee satisfaction and financial accountability. This course will cover cost control, methods that are specific to managing food service operations, including food waste and theft.

NUTR595: Nutrition And Genetic Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Both Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for online MPH students; term(s) for online MS students.
  • 3 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 3 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward (Online MPH); Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward (Online MS);
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 501 or 521 and PUBHLTH 512
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course familiarizes students with general methods and principles of nutrition and genetic epidemiology. In this course, students learn about methods to collect nutritional and genetic information at the population level, and how to apply methods of nutritional and genetic epidemiology to examine the relationship of diet, genes, and disease.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Explain different methods to collect nutrition data 2. Assess strengths and weaknesses of different methods to collect nutrition data in epidemiological studies 3. Apply analytic tools to adjust for energy intake on nutritional epidemiology studies 4. Determine association of dietary factors with health outcomes 5. Explain types of genetic variation at the population level 6. Calculate allele frequencies at the population level 7. Understand factors affecting allele frequencies 8. Identify publicly available data for studies of genetic epidemiology 9. Calculate measures of association of genetic factors and health outcomes 10. Describe types of gene-diet interaction 11. Analyze datasets to estimate measures of gene-diet interaction 12. Interpret results of gene-diet interaction analysis 13. Summarize results of gene-diet interaction analysis to identify at-risk subjects

NUTR596: Precision Nutrition Within A Lifecourse Epidemiological Framework

  • Graduate level
  • Both Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for online MPH students; Winter term(s) for online MS students.
  • 3 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 3 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Perng, Wei (Online MPH); Perng, Wei (Online MS);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: NUTR595
  • Description: Metabolic heterogeneity, or differences in metabolism, drives need for precision nutrition. In this course, we will learn about sources of metabolic heterogeneity and ways in which precision nutrition addresses this phenomenon across the life course.
  • Learning Objectives: Define precision nutrition and explain how precision/personalized nutrition differs from the traditional field of nutrition and dietary assessment • Identify biological, behavioral, and environmental sources of metabolic heterogeneity • Apply lifecourse epidemiology conceptual frameworks to the study of metabolic heterogeneity

NUTR597: Precision Nutrition: Translating Science To Practice

  • Graduate level
  • Both Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for online MPH students; Winter term(s) for online MS students.
  • 2 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Aaronson, Susan Ball, Sarah (Online MPH); Aaronson, Susan Ball, Sarah (Online MS);
  • Prerequisites: NUTR 594, NUTR 595, NUTR 596
  • Description: In this novel course, students will understand, translate and incorporate the emerging fields of nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics, culinary medicine and the microbiome into personalized nutrition practice grounded in public health principles.
  • Learning Objectives: 1 Demonstrate literacy comprehension regarding the emerging science of precision nutrition. 2 Understand the role public health principles play in a precision nutrition approach 3 Describe the role of the microbiome and genetics in chronic disease prevention and treatment 4 Summarize the large precision nutrition randomized controlled trials 5 Explain how food and nutrients impact gene expression and the microbiome 6 Demonstrate how to incorporate culinary genomics into practice 7 Evaluate how genetics and the microbiome are currently being used in practice. 8 Translate current public health nutrition guidelines and recommendations to the individual using genetic and microbiome data. 9 Implement culinary techniques (food and nutrients?) to optimize health. 10 Determine if the current evidence supports the use of precision nutrition in practice and how it can be effectively applied
  • This course is cross-listed with .
Concentration Competencies that NUTR597 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
Population and Health Sciences MPH Recommend evidence-based interventions that engage broad and diverse community stakeholders for population health improvement PUBHLTH515, EPID591, NUTR597, PUBHLTH511

NUTR620: Multivariate Analysis of Nutrition Related Studies

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 521 or Instructor consent
  • Description: This course will teach students how to use multivariate statistical techniques to analyze nutritional data. Students will develop skills for the understanding, interpretation, and communication of nutrition-related results on relation to different health outcomes. Students will present a final report with the synthesis and conclusions of all their analyses.
  • Learning Objectives: The student will learn to: -Carry out multivariate analysis to evaluate association between dietary exposures, biomarkers, and health outcomes. -Derive, using principal component analysis, and interpret dietary patterns from dietary intake data. -Summarize, present, and discuss results of nutrition related studies. -Critically read relevant literature.

NUTR622: Weight Bias & Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Sonneville, Kendrin (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTATS521 and/or 501
  • Advisory Prerequisites: NUTR 621
  • Description: This course is designed to introduce students to the pervasiveness and consequences of weight bias. Students will be introduced to weigh-inclusive alternatives (e.g. Health at Every Size) to weight-normative approaches common in public health and health care and will examine issues such as size diversity through a social justice lens.
  • Learning Objectives: Discuss the science of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention in population health, including health promotion, screening, etc. Explain behavioral and psychological factors that affect a population's health

NUTR626: Controversial topics in the role of nutrition on chronic disease

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Baylin, Ana (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600/503 or equivalent or and BIOSTAT 501/521 or equivalent
  • Description: This public health oriented course will provide students the opportunity to advance their knowledge in nutrition and chronic disease research from a population perspective and help them to better interpret epidemiologic studies on nutrition and chronic disease.
  • This course is cross-listed with EPID 625 in the Epidemiology department.

NUTR631: Metabolism of Vitamins & Minerals

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Bridges, Dave (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: EHS 630
  • Description: This course provides an in-depth introduction to vitamin and mineral metabolism with particular emphasis on nutrient bioavailability and absorption, transport and tissue accumulation, regulation of nutrient metabolism and homeostasis, and nutrient function. Other topics include the health effects of inadequate and excessive micronutrient intake, methods used to estimate nutrient requirements and establish nutrient intake reference and upper limit levels. The depth of micronutrient metabolism covered in this course will provide a sufficient background for students to better understand the scientific literature of individual micronutrients. The course will consist of lectures on the major metabolic/regulatory topics for each micronutrient as well as discussions of nutrient-related topics from the current scientific literature.
Concentration Competencies that NUTR631 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR MPH Explain how macro- and micronutrient intake drive metabolic pathways and physiological function NUTR630, NUTR631
NUTR MS Deduce how specific micronutrient deficiencies relate to poor health including the mechanism(s) of action NUTR631
NUTR Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition PhD Predict the consequences of nutrient deficiencies or excesses based on principles of macronutrient and micronutrient biochemistry NUTR630, NUTR631, Doctoral Qualifying Exam
NUTR Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition PhD Predict how genetic variations in enzymes, nutrient transporters or regulators could affect human health and disease NUTR630, NUTR631, NUTR638, Doctoral Qualifying Exam
NUTR Nutritional Epidemiology PhD Explain how the biological nature of vitamins and minerals relates to population health NUTR631
NUTR Nutritional Interventions PhD Apply knowledge of macronutrients and micronutrients to nutrition policies and programs addressing health of populations NUTR630, NUTR631

NUTR633: Evaluation of Global Nutrition Programs

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Jones, Andrew (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: At least one foundational course in both biostatistics and epidemiology.
  • Description: This course will provide students with an understanding of the principles of program evaluation with an emphasis on global nutrition programs. The course will create a space for discussion and practice in which knowledge can be applied to current global nutrition issues through research and critical analysis.
Concentration Competencies that NUTR633 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR MPH Develop appropriate designs to rigorously monitor and evaluate nutrition programs and policies in diverse contexts NUTR633, NUTR650, NUTR677
NUTR MPH Apply public health theoretical frameworks and nutrition research evidence to inform public health actions NUTR642, NUTR650, NUTR677, NUTR633

NUTR637: Medical Nutrition Therapy II

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Hudson, Liz (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: EHS 636
  • Description: Applies nutrition support principles to various clinical disease states. Covers topics such as regulation of fluid and electrolytes in nutrition support, acid-base balance, and other aspects of parenteral nutrition. In addition, the pathophysiology and medical nutrition therapy for diabetes, renal and liver disease is taught.

NUTR646: Approaches in Nutrition Counseling

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Sonneville, Kendrin (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: NUTR 636: Medical Nutrition Therapy I
  • Description: The aim of this course is to familiarize dietetics students with counseling strategies that can be used for nutrition behavior change. The course will emphasize both the art and the science of nutrition counseling, as well as the practical aspects of implementing counseling for dietary change.

NUTR650: Socio-ecological Approaches to Child and Adolescent Nutrition

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Bauer, Kate (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: graduate student status,graduate student status
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course utilizes a socio-ecological approach to provide a comprehensive introduction to issues and current debates related to public health nutrition among children and adolescents. Throughout the semester, woven through all of these topics, there will be extensive consideration of appropriate research methodologies and critical reading of current scientific literature.
  • Syllabus for NUTR650
Concentration Competencies that NUTR650 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR MPH Develop appropriate designs to rigorously monitor and evaluate nutrition programs and policies in diverse contexts NUTR633, NUTR650, NUTR677
NUTR MPH Apply public health theoretical frameworks and nutrition research evidence to inform public health actions NUTR642, NUTR650, NUTR677, NUTR633
NUTR MPH Explain dietary influences on health outcomes, and identify population-based strategies to improve nutritional health NUTR642, NUTR650, NUTR677
NUTR Nutritional Interventions PhD Demonstrate familiarity of behavioral change theories and conceptual frameworks relevant to nutrition interventions in clinical and/or community contexts NUTR650

NUTR651: Physical Activity and Nutrition

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Mancuso, Peter (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: NUTR 630 KINES 540,,NUTR 630 KINES 540,NUTR 630 KINES 540,,NUTR 630 KINES 540
  • Description: Students will learn about the impact of physical activity on the nutrition requirements in active individuals and special populations with chronic disease. Students will also learn how to use exercise and diet modification for weight loss and maintenance through lectures and hands on activities.
  • This course is cross-listed with KINES 543 in the Kinesiology department.

NUTR657: Nutrition, the Environment, and Cancer

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Colacino, Justin Zick, Suzanna (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 502 or 522 or equivalent; EPID 503 or equivalent; and PHYSIO 502 or equivalent
  • Description: A large amount of research indicates that dietary and environmental factors impact the development and recurrence of various types of cancer. This course will survey both classic and emerging literature relevant to this topic in a structured discussion and journal club format.

NUTR688: Research Topics in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 0.5 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Aaronson, Susan (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course will introduce students to current topics in nutrition research. Students will attend seminars focused on research that will demonstrate the impact of nutrition on human health. Students are encouraged to pose questions to the speaker and write 5-7 bullet points that provide a summary of each presentation.
  • This course is cross-listed with .
Concentration Competencies that NUTR688 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR MS Interpret key findings from advanced nutritional research NUTR688, NUTR698/9
NUTR Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition PhD Describe findings from presentations of novel nutritional research NUTR688
NUTR Nutritional Epidemiology PhD integrate findings of novel nutrition research with existing knowledge of nutritional epidemiology NUTR688
NUTR Nutritional Interventions PhD Integrate findings from presentations of novel nutritional research with existing knowledge of nutritional interventions NUTR688

NUTR697: Readings in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Supervised study/review of a selected topic in nutritional sciences. May be elected more than once for a maximum of six credits.

NUTR698: Research in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-6 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Original research investigation of a special topic in nutritional sciences.

NUTR699: Masters Thesis in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Perm of Thesis Advisor
  • Description: This course shall be elected by students enrolled in Master's degree programs that require a formal written thesis as a condition of program completion. The thesis shall be defended in front of the student's thesis committee. The course grade will reflect the student's accomplishments relative to the thesis and its defense. The course is to be elected only once.

NUTR701: Research Methods in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Hudson, Liz (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course is designed to introduce research methods to 1st year MS and PhD students. Overall, the course will help students engage on their individual research journey. Students should be prepared to discuss research ideas for further development throughout the course. We will discuss the typical format of reported research, including how and why each section is constructed. We will discuss strategies for conducting a review of the literature that clarifies what is known and unknown about their topic. The course will conclude by allowing students to develop their own research proposals, engage in the process of peer review, and present their final proposals to the class.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Develop a framework for understanding nutrition and public health research 2. Critically evaluate nutrition research 3. Formulate a scientific research question and relevant hypotheses for a given topic 4. Conduct a review of the literature 5. Understand the components of a research manuscript and styles of scientific writing 6. Practice the art of peer review and providing constructive feedback 7. Develop the major components of a research proposal

NUTR796: Special Topics in Nutritional Sciences

NUTR802: Professional Development and Technical Writing

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Sonneville, Kendrin (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: EHS801
  • Description: Doctoral students must learn to think critically about their own writing, the writing of their peers, and the process of writing in general. This course will center on peer review, written critiques, and lectures from experts to build the skills necessary to craft a piece of writing with these elements.

NUTR830: Advanced Topics in Macronutrient Metabolism

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter 2022
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: NUTR630 and NUTR631
  • Description: This course is an elective designed for research-based molecular nutrition students. It will introduce topics and methods in biochemical and molecular nutrition research. We will use group discussions and individual projects to enhance critical analysis skills and learn how to follow in the rapidly advancing field of molecular nutrition.
  • Learning Objectives: * Develop high critical thinking skills such as synthesis and projecting future studies within recent macromolecular nutrition topics. * Learn how to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of nutrition research. * Gain fluency in the molecular nutrition literature including how to assess the validity of claims. * Familiarize yourself with the process of developing research grant proposals and reviews. * Identify limitations in research articles, and how this affects the rigor and universality of their conclusions. * Interpret and evaluate modern molecular nutrition methods based on their implementation and appropriate controls. * Evaluate emerging themes in macromolecular nutrition that affect individual responses to the diet.
Concentration Competencies that NUTR830 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition PhD Create a rigorous study design to test a research question based on a critical evaluation of prior literature NUTR990, NUTR995, NUTR830

NUTR869: Innovations in Nutrition Research

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Jansen, Erica Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Doctoral, MPH and MS student with demonstrated interest in Nutritional Sciences research (with permission),Doctoral, MPH and MS student with demonstrated interest in Nutritional Sciences research (with permission)
  • Description: The course will include: -integrative discussions of dissertation research projects -presentations of research findings -in-depth literature reviews and critiques -manuscript reviews in Nutritional Sciences
Concentration Competencies that NUTR869 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition PhD Disseminate rigorous research findings through clear, persuasive written and oral communication to both peers and non-technical audiences NUTR869
NUTR Nutritional Interventions PhD Disseminate rigorous research findings through clear, persuasive written and oral communication to both peers and non-technical audiences NUTR869

NUTR899: Advanced Research in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-6 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Must be a PhD student in Nutritional Sciences
  • Description: Original investigations of a specific research topic in Nutritional Sciences. Designed for doctoral students performing research prior to passing their qualifying exams. Students will complete two separate rotations with faculty members for a minimum of 1 credit each. This course may be elected more than once.

NUTR990: Dissertation Research/Pre-Candidate

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Nutritional Sciences Doctoral Student
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to status as a candidate.
Concentration Competencies that NUTR990 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition PhD Create a rigorous study design to test a research question based on a critical evaluation of prior literature NUTR990, NUTR995, NUTR830
NUTR Nutritional Interventions PhD Create a rigorous intervention study design to test a research question based on a critical evaluation of prior literature NUTR990, NUTR995, Preliminary Exam

NUTR995: Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-8 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Nutritional Sciences Doctoral Student
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student who has been admitted to status as a candidate
Concentration Competencies that NUTR995 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
NUTR Molecular and Biochemical Nutrition PhD Create a rigorous study design to test a research question based on a critical evaluation of prior literature NUTR990, NUTR995, NUTR830
NUTR Nutritional Interventions PhD Create a rigorous intervention study design to test a research question based on a critical evaluation of prior literature NUTR990, NUTR995, Preliminary Exam

PUBHLTH200: Health and Society: Introduction to Public Health

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Youatt, Emily (Residential);
  • Offered every fall term and during even numbered winter terms (ex: Winter 2024, Winter 2026, etc.)
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Advisory Prerequisites: Introductory chemistry lecture and introductory biology lecture.
  • Description:

    This course is intended to serve as an introduction to the major issues of public health with a focus on the United States, although global health issues are considered as well. We will examine what those issues are, what determines them, and how they can be altered. As a survey of the entire field of public health, the course provides a broad overview for students wishing no more than an introduction to the field, as well as good grounding for students who wish to pursue additional coursework in public health.

    The winter term offering is a blended learning course. It combines online content and activities with face-to-face learning.

  • Learning Objectives: To give undergraduates a good understanding of what is really important in public health, what determines health, and how society influences health.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH200

PUBHLTH257: Behavioral And Social Science Research In Hiv: Methods And Perspectives For Sexual & Gender Minority Communities

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Harper, Gary (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This intensive course is exclusively for SOAR students (Student Opportunities for AIDS/HIV Research). Rising juniors enrolled at the Ann Arbor campus are eligible to apply to participate in the SOAR program. During their junior and senior years, students will complete a two-year-long research experiences and a short-term summer research experience or internship. Learn more about the program and apply at irwg.umich.edu/soar
  • Learning Objectives: Class sessions will cover interdisciplinary learning about HIV and sexual and gender minority health populations, with a focus on theoretical and methodological frameworks such as intersectionality and HIV, critical race theory and HIV, queer theory and HIV, and minority stress theory and HIV. Specific sections of the course will include interdisciplinary explorations of health inequities and social determinants of health, especially as they apply to HIV, ethnic/racial minorities, sexual and gender minorities and women. Research ethics will be covered in these meetings as well, deeply situated in a historical study of events such as the Tuskegee experiments, J. Marion Sim’s gynecological experimentation on enslaved Black women, and ACT UP’s treatment activism and collaboration in the early days of the AIDS crisis.
  • This course is cross-listed with WGS 377 in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts department.

PUBHLTH305: The Environment And Human Health

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course introduces major issues of environmental health science. We will examine what those issues are, what determines them, and how they can be altered. The course provides an overview for students who want an introduction to environmental health as well as students planning to pursue additional environmental health coursework.

PUBHLTH308: Black American Health: A Focus on Children, Families, and Communities

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Riana (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Advisory Prerequisites: PUBHLTH 200
  • Description: Given persistent challenges to Black American health in the US, this course explores fundamental systems aiding to and robust strengths resisting against health inequalities. Taking a culturally-specific approach to understanding lived experiences of Black Americans, we examine ways in which systems adapt to and must change for optimal health development.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. To explore the mental and physical health trajectories of Black youth. 2. To understand how familial, community, and system-level factors impact the well-being of Black youth. 3. To consider (e.g., discover, discuss, and/or develop) effective interventions for Black children, families, and communities.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH308

PUBHLTH309: Hunger in America: Building Skills to Feed Communities

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Aaronson, Susan Bauer, Kate (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Food insecurity, or a lack of consistent access to enough food for an active, healthy life, affects 1 in 8 Americans, and nearly 1 in 3 University of Michigan students. Food insecurity is caused by the intersection of a wide range of factors, from personal cooking skills to neighborhood food access to federal food policies. For this reason, fighting food insecurity in the US requires advocates with diverse skills, knowledge, and perspectives working together. This course seeks to provide students at the University of Michigan with these skills, knowledge, and perspectives, allowing them to become leaders to improve their own health and wellbeing and that of their communities and nationwide. To accomplish this, the course will integrate community visits; in-classroom, hands-on activities; and instructor-guided seminars to help students understand the experience and impacts of food insecurity across critical life stages of development (children, young adults, seniors).
  • Learning Objectives: Identify the relationships between social, economic, community, and personal circumstances that contribute to food insecurity. (Competency 1) Describe how food insecurity impacts social, physical, mental, and intellectual wellbeing. (Competency 1) Understand the role of community-based resources in combating food insecurity. (Competency 1) Understand the role that state and federal nutrition assistance programs have in addressing food insecurity and mitigating impacts of food insecurity. (Competency 1) Design nutritionally-adequate and financially-feasible menus for vulnerable individuals and families. (Competency 2) Demonstrate ability to access and purchase low-cost, nutritionally adequate food that aligns with federal food assistance requirements. (Competency 2) Demonstrate ability to prepare basic, affordable, socially-acceptable and nutritionally-balanced meals. (Competency 2)
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH309

PUBHLTH310: Nutrition in the life cycle

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Olivia (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: Introductory chemistry lecture, Introductory biology lecture
  • Description: Nutrition in the Life Cycle will cover nutritional needs of individuals during critical stages of development. Students will learn about the biological basis for nutritional requirements in normal development and maintaining health in adulthood. Consequences of over- and under-nutrition and how to identify and address these issues will be discussed.
  • This course is cross-listed with A NUTR 500-level course.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH310

PUBHLTH313: LGBTQ+ Health Promotion: Local and Global Strategies

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Harper, Gary (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: PUBHLTH 360
  • Description: This skills-based course is focused on providing students with the background, knowledge, skills, and experience needed to create a range of LGBTQ+ health promotion products/materials, programs/interventions, and policies/structural change strategies for diverse populations in multiple settings - including strategies used in local U.S. settings and in global settings. Students will explore and understand health concerns experienced by LGBTQ+ people and communities, and examine the range of LGBTQ+ specific social determinants of health and health inequities. LGBTQ+ health promotion strategies that are delivered at multiple socioecological levels (i.e., individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, and structural/policy) will be reviewed and analyzed in order to explore benefits and challenges of each. Students will then critically analyze existing LGBTQ+ health promotion materials and products (both local and global); interventions and programs; and health policies and other structural change strategies. They will also produce their own LGBTQ+ health promotion product or material; concept sheet for the development of a new LGBTQ+ health promotion intervention or program; and LGBTQ+ specific health policy brief or fact sheet. Finally, students will work with a global LGBTQ+ focused community-based organization (CBO) to develop and produce an LGBTQ+ health promotion product, program concept, or policy brief to be used by the CBO.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of this course students should be able to: -Describe common health concerns experienced by LGBTQ+ people and communities in both local and global communities. -Describe a range of LGBTQ+-specific social determinants of health and health inequities. -Compare and contrast existing local and global LGBTQ+ health promotion strategies delivered at multiple socioecological levels, including individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, and structural/policy. -Critically analyze existing LGBTQ+ health promotion materials and products, and develop such materials/products that can be used in both local and global settings. -Critically analyze existing LGBTQ+ health promotion interventions/programs, and develop a concept sheet for the development of a new intervention/program. -Critically analyze existing LGBTQ+ health policies and other structural change strategies, and develop a health policy brief or fact sheet. -Work with a global community-based organization (CBO) to develop and produce an LGBTQ+ health promotion product, program concept, or policy brief to be used by the CBO.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH313

PUBHLTH314: Public Health in U.S. Popular Culture

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Youatt, Emily (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: PUBHLTH 200
  • Description: Public health has a public relations problem: it is under appreciated, underfunded, and - when working well - its contributions to population health are often invisible. Yet, public health issues engage political, economic, philosophical, moral, and religious questions that are universally - and sometimes personally -- relevant. Using the lens of popular culture, we will critically examine public health history, concepts, and contemporary challenges. In doing so, we will explore diverse perspectives and experiences, make connections between the past and present, and develop greater empathy for the factors shaping people's lives and influencing their health.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of this course students should be able to: 1. Identify public health concepts, themes, and challenges in popular culture texts. 2. Analyze the roles of setting (time and place), characters, narrative structure, and medium in portraying public health issues. 3. 3. Critique the ways assigned texts represent race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, nativity status, and other social identities, and, when relevant the intersections between these representations and key public health issues. 4. Differentiate the contributions of academic versus popular culture texts in understanding public health issues. 5. Facilitate an effective, inclusive group discussion. 6. Reflect on how your own understanding of a public health issue (or those affected by it) changes based on viewing it through a popular culture text.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH314

PUBHLTH318: Food Literacy for All

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Leung, Cindy (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Advisory Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course offers a unique opportunity for students to gain an interdisciplinary overview of crises and opportunities in today's food system through a weekly lecture series bringing high-profile speakers to campus from diverse sectors: academia, grassroots movements, public health, farming, and more. Designed as an academic-community partnership, the course is led by a UM faculty member (Leung) with a leader in food justice in Detroit (Hebron), along with the program manager of the UM Sustainable Food Systems Initiative (Shapiro).
  • Learning Objectives: 1) Describe the term "food system" and influencing factors 2) Discuss how food systems impact public and environmental health 3) Describe strategies to promote health equity within local and national food systems 4) Propose opportunities for improving the food system and the social and environmental levels
  • This course is cross-listed with EAS 639 ENVIRON 314 NUR518 (pending) in the SEAS, LSA Program in the Environment, SPH Nutritional Sciences department.

PUBHLTH350: Global Public Health: Challenges and Transformations

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Wagner, Abram (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course integrates foundational principles of political science and international studies in an exploration of epidemiological transitions, goal-setting in international organizations, and other global public health challenges. Students will investigate health disparities between countries and between socioeconomic groups within a country, and will discuss key communicable and non-communicable health conditions.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH350

PUBHLTH382: Population Health Determinants & Disparities

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Neblett, Enrique (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH200
  • Description: This course explores the social and environmental factors that impact disease susceptibility across populations. Students will learn of the complexities and interactions of factors that influence patterns of disease and health at multiple levels. The course will introduce key analytic frameworks and metrics for evaluating public health problems.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Define population health within the context of public health 2. Describe the importance of context in understanding population health 3. Explain the nature of health and disease at individual and societal levels 4. Identify how health is defined culturally and describe how cultural factors influence health 5. Identify key risk factors at multiple behavioral and genetic levels 6. Distinguish health disparities in relation to race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, geographic location, and other socio-economic dimensions 7. Critically apply key concepts and analytic frameworks to address population health issues 8. Describe the role of data in assessing, describing and evaluating the complex interactions among multiple determinants of health and disease

PUBHLTH383: Data Driven Solutions in Public Health

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Zawistowski, Matt (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: STAT250; PUBHLTH 200
  • Description: This course introduces the importance of data in public health, including collection, analysis, interpretations, and dissemination. It provides examples of data used to evaluate public health decisions, policy and resource allocation. It is an introduction to biostatistical and epidemiological methods, informatics, and big data including usage, management and challenges.
  • Learning Objectives: 1)Identify key strategies and methods for obtaining current public health data 2)Explain the use of basic epidemiological methods in study design and implementation to generate new data and metrics to address public health issues 3)Illustrate how analyses and results are used to inform intervention development and influence appropriate public health policies. 4)Apply statistical methods in order to describe data, make inferences and test hypotheses regarding population parameters 5)Apply results from data analyses to explore, define, identify and prioritize public health challenges and solutions
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH383

PUBHLTH400: Race and Racism in Public Health

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 4 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Needham, Belinda (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: junior standing; 6 hours of social science coursework
  • Description: This 4-credit course will apply theories and concepts about race and ethnicity from the social sciences and humanities to public health settings, with a focus on conceptualization and measurement of race and racism.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Define race and ethnicity; describe the ways in which race and ethnicity are conceptualized over space and time; describe the ways in which race and ethnicity are measured in public health research 2. Define cultural and structural racism as distinct from other related concepts such as discrimination; describe several ways in which racism is linked to the health of White and non-White Americans and to racial/ethnic health inequalities 3. Describe the ways in which racism operates to define and redefine race and ethnicity, particularly through cultural processes such as racialization 4. Describe the ways in which cultural racism influences social structure to burden non-White racial/ethnic groups 5. Discuss the ways in which the lens of the researcher may impact studies on racial/ethnic health inequalities

PUBHLTH402: Changing Health Behaviors: What Works

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Piette, John (Residential);
  • Last offered Winter, 2018
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH 200
  • Description: This course gives undergraduate students an introduction to how brief interventions are used to impact health behaviors and the approaches used to help people make and attain behavior-change goals. Students also gain skills in applying scientific evidence from randomized trials and systematic reviews in public health decision-making.
  • Learning Objectives: 1) Know what brief behavioral interventions are and how they are delivered to address behavioral challenges 2) Know where to look for evidence supporting the effectiveness of brief interventions 3) Be able to review, interpret, and apply evidence from randomized trials, systematic reviews, and guidelines 4) Understand what types of brief interventions have the strongest evidence and for whom they work
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH402

PUBHLTH407: Links between Infectious and Non-Communicable Diseases

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Yang, Zhenhua (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH370 (or equivalent)
  • Advisory Prerequisites: an introductory microbiology and immunology course or an introductory infectious disease course and an introductory non-communicable disease course.
  • Description: This course introduces the students to the etiology, pathogenesis, and the evolution of epidemiology of major infectious and non-communicable diseases. It discusses the links between major infectious and non-communicable diseases, including epidemiological evidence, the underlying mechanisms, and their public health implications.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Gain an understanding of the international statistical classification of diseases and related health problems. 2. Describe the etiology, history, pathogenesis, and evolution of major infectious and non-infectious diseases in different populations. 3. Review epidemiological evidence for links between major infectious and non-communicable diseases 4. Identify methodologies required for studying links between infectious and non-communicable diseases and for exploring the underlying mechanisms of such links. 5. Discuss the public health implications of epidemiological transitions of human diseases and the infectious and non-communicable disease links.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH407

PUBHLTH410: Making Change: Public Health Policy Advocacy in Principle and Practice

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH 200
  • Description: This class will provide students with skills to advocate for public health policies at all levels of government. Through lectures, class discussions, and group projects on "live" public health issues, students develop the skills to create opportunities to inform policymaking, and become more effective communicating in the policymaking environment.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Appraise the political landscape and stakeholders that are important for making policy change on a given public health topic. 2. Apply principles of policy-making, policy change theory, and policy advocacy to real life public health problems. 3. Effectively advocate for public health change at the local, state and federal level. 4. Develop strong written and verbal communication skills. 5. Define and frame public health problems in such a way that inspires policy change. 6. Analyze the legislative, administrative and judicial intervention points for policymaking and identify where to effectively target advocacy efforts. 7. Identify and evaluate advocacy strategies, such as coalition building, grassroots engagement, and paid and earned media outreach, in order to create specific advocacy campaigns. 8. Develop personal and communication skills to effectively translate and advocate for public health improvements to policymakers, the press and the public.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH410

PUBHLTH450: Critical Reflections on Global Public Health

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Lee, Gwenyth (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH350 or permission of instructor
  • Description: This advanced seminar is intended to interrogate global public health practice from multiple disciplinary perspectives. We will juxtapose historical analysis and contemporary observation to critique ways in which the health issues of developing countries are discussed, studied, and intervened upon by global health actors, especially those from the United States.
  • Learning Objectives: Students taking this course are expected to: 1. Understand the historical origins of global public health as a field and draw connections between historical movements in global health and current practice. 2. Critique how social, political and economic forces influence how global health priorities are set, how studies and programs are designed, and how studies and programs are evaluated and reported. 3. Analyze current trends in global health practice, research and training, evaluate those trends based on principles of equity, and discuss opportunities to implement principles of 'responsible global health citizenship' in their future work.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH450

PUBHLTH457: Translating Hiv Research Into Policy And Practice For Sgm Communities

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Harper, Gary (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course is required course for seniors in the SOAR program. Students will work on professional development for research careers, including applying to graduate programs, discussing behavioral and social science career issues in a group setting, and working on research products such as articles for publication or policy briefs.
  • Learning Objectives: ● Describe a range of SGM-specific HIV-focused social determinants of health and health inequities. ● Compare and contrast existing local and global efforts to translate and disseminate findings from SGM-focused HIV prevention and treatment research delivered at multiple socio-ecological levels, including individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, and structural/policy. ● Critically analyze existing SGM-focused HIV prevention and treatment health promotion materials and products, and develop such materials/products that can be used in both local and global settings. ● Critically analyze existing SGM-focused HIV prevention and treatment policies and other structural change strategies, and develop a health policy brief or fact sheet. ● Describe the type of research career they wish to pursue, including the additional training and experiences they will need to pursue such a career. ● Develop a detailed strategic plan focused on short, medium, and long-term goals related to gaining the appropriate training and skills needed to obtain their desired research career.
  • This course is cross-listed with WGS 482 in the LSA department.

PUBHLTH460: Introduction to Bacterial Pathogenesis

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Rickard, Alex (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Pubhlth 370 or Bio 207, AND Pubhlth 311 or Bio 305
  • Description: Microbial structures and their relation to basic mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis; structure, function, and genetics of bacterial toxins; and host resistance and immunity. Discussions of pathogenic organisms of major public health importance, diseases caused, and their epidemiology.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Understand the role played by bacteria in human health and disease. 2. Understand how genetic transfer mechanisms can lead to bacteria with increased virulence and antibiotic resistance. 3. Understand how bacterial toxins and other virulence factors help bacteria cause disease. 4. Understand public health approaches to preventing bacterial diseases. 5. Understand how antibiotics kill bacteria and how bacteria become resistant to them.
  • This course is cross-listed with Epid 460 in the Epidemiology, SPH department.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH460

PUBHLTH477: Readings in Public Health

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Review of literature or directed readings on selected topic related to one or more areas of public health.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of the term, students should be able to find and appropriately interpret and critically evaluate the findings in peer-reviewed scientific literature.

PUBHLTH478: Practical Projects in Public Health

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Practical projects allows undergraduate students to explore community-based public health settings. Project must be related to public health practice and developed in consultation with a faculty advisor. Students will write an integrative paper analyzing the organization's role in the public health system and critically reflecting on their experience.
  • Learning Objectives: As part of this course students will consider the following concepts: 1. Health promotion at a population level 2. Community dynamics and the cultural context in which public health professionals work 3. Organizational structure and dynamics, including the organization's role in the public health system 4. How to operate professionally in a public health organization (including but not limited to: personal work ethic, professionalism, teamwork, and leadership)

PUBHLTH479: Independent Research in Public Health

  • Undergraduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Students conduct independent research on a specific public health topic under the supervision of a public health faculty member.
  • Learning Objectives: After completing this course, students will: 1. Understand how to form a research question; 2. Be able to identify relevant literature or data sources to address a research question; 3. Better understand the role of data in understanding public health problems.

PUBHLTH503: Service Learning for Health Professionals

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: An interdisciplinary service-based course required for all pharmacy students and elective for students of other health science disciplines. Learning experiences will focus on social justice and professional responsibilities for civic engagement. Through class participation, reflection, and guided discussions, students will explore issues of health disparities, poverty, and the medically under-served. Students participate in community service in addition to regular classroom discussion sessions.
  • This course is cross-listed with PHARM 503, SW 573, KINESLGY 581, MOVESCI 481.

PUBHLTH510: Communication Fundamentals

  • Graduate level
  • Online MPH only
  • This is a first year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for online MPH students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for online MPH students;
  • Instructor(s): Zikmund-Fisher, Brian (Online MPH);
  • Prerequisites: SPH MPH and SPH MHSA Residential Students Only or By Instructor Permission
  • Description: This course will cover fundamental skills in how to communicate science and health information clearly to both scientific and non-scientific audiences. This course uses a blended format combining in-person sessions and online tasks to maximize students' ability to practice these skills.
  • This course is required for the school-wide core curriculum

PUBHLTH511: Nutrition and Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential and Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a first year course for Online students
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students; Fall term(s) for online MPH students; Fall term(s) for online MS students.
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Hudson, Liz Hazzard, Vivienne (Residential); Peterson, Karen Leung, Cindy (Online MPH); Leung, Cindy Peterson, Karen (Online MS);
  • Prerequisites: SPH MPH and SPH MHSA Residential Students Only or By Instructor Permission
  • Description: Introduce MPH students to important topics in nutrition and public health, program planning and program evaluation. PUBHLTH511 is an introductory course to nutrition research and will cover topics, such as healthful diet patterns, methods of dietary assessment, nutritional epidemiology, nutrition through the life cycle, and nutritional needs of diverse populations. This course will have a hybrid style (online & in-class) of instruction.
  • Learning Objectives: Students will be able to: 1) apply nutrition indicators for different public health purposes, including: estimating prevalence, monitoring and surveillance, and investigating diet and disease relationships, identifying at-risk individuals and groups, and evaluating programs; 2) apply public health conceptual frameworks and nutrition research evidence to inform public health actions; 3) use evidence-based knowledge to develop nutrition programs and interventions for diverse populations; and 4) develop appropriate designs to rigorously monitor and evaluate nutrition programs and policies in diverse contexts.
  • This course is required for the school-wide core curriculum
Concentration Competencies that PUBHLTH511 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
Population and Health Sciences MPH Design multisector collaborations that will support all phases of population health improvement (assessment, planning, implementation, evaluation) PUBHLTH515, HBEHED590, HBEHED591, PUBHLTH511
Population and Health Sciences MPH Recommend evidence-based interventions that engage broad and diverse community stakeholders for population health improvement PUBHLTH515, EPID591, NUTR597, PUBHLTH511
Population and Health Sciences MS Demonstrate knowledge of the major issues and current research problems in population health using at least two key disciplines (e.g., biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health, nutritional science). PUBHLTH511, PUBHLTH512, PUBHLTH514, PUBHLTH515
Population and Health Sciences MS Critically evaluate research reports and publications. PUBHLTH511, PUBHLTH511, PUBHLTH515
Population and Health Sciences MS Apply methodological skills needed to plan, conduct, critique and/or research population health issues and solutions. BIOSTAT591, PUBHLTH511, PUBHLTH512, PUBHLTH515, PUBHLTH682, PUBHLTH683

PUBHLTH512: Principles of Epidemiology for Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential and Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a first year course for Online students
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students; Fall term(s) for online MPH students; Fall term(s) for online MS students.
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students; 3 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 3 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Pearce, C. Leigh Karvonen-Gutierrez, Carrie (Residential); Karvonen-Gutierrez, Carrie Pearce, C. Leigh (Online MPH);
  • Prerequisites: SPH MPH and SPH MHSA Residential Students Only or By Instructor Permission
  • Advisory Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 501 or equivalent course
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course provides a foundation to the principles of epidemiology for applications to public health. This introductory epidemiology course is for students who are NOT pursuing an Epidemiology MPH. The course will overview the fundamental concepts of epidemiology including measures of frequency and association, study design, data collection and interpretation. This course will have a hybrid style (online & in-class) of instruction.
  • This course is required for the school-wide core curriculum
  • Residential Syllabus for PUBHLTH512
Concentration Competencies that PUBHLTH512 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
EHS Industrial Hygiene MS Analyze, interpret, and apply statistical and epidemiological data PUBHLTH512, EPID601, Thesis
Population and Health Sciences MS Demonstrate knowledge of the major issues and current research problems in population health using at least two key disciplines (e.g., biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health, nutritional science). PUBHLTH511, PUBHLTH512, PUBHLTH514, PUBHLTH515
Population and Health Sciences MS Apply methodological skills needed to plan, conduct, critique and/or research population health issues and solutions. BIOSTAT591, PUBHLTH511, PUBHLTH512, PUBHLTH515, PUBHLTH682, PUBHLTH683

PUBHLTH513: Public Health Systems, Policy and Management

  • Graduate level
  • Both Residential and Online MPH
  • This is a first year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for residential students; Winter term(s) for online MPH students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students; 3 credit hour(s) for online MPH students;
  • Instructor(s): Rubyan, Michael (Residential); Rubyan, Michael (Online MPH);
  • Prerequisites: SPH MPH Students Only
  • Description: This course will introduce students to the public health system, public health policy development, and fundamental management concepts for managing public health organizations. Topics covered include organization, financing and history of public health, public health policy-making, advocacy, and basic principles of finance and human resource management in public health organizations.
  • Learning Objectives: (1) Students should be able to describe how public health and health care are organized and financed in the United States. (2) Students should be able to provide a brief history of public health. (3) Students should be able to explain key aspects of health care reform. (4) Students should be able to describe the core functions of public health and the 10 Essential Services. (5) Students should be able to describe the importance of financial and human resource management in public health and health care organizations (6) Students should be able to apply negotiation and mediation skills to address interpersonal and interorganizational challenges. (7) Students should be able to discuss the format and use of different types of budgets, prepare simple operating budgets and conduct variance analysis. (8) Students should be able to discuss the public health policy-making process. (9) Students should be able to describe the role of ethics in policy making. (10) Students should be able to advocate for political, social or economic policies and programs that will improve health in diverse populations. (11) Students should be able to propose strategies to identify stakeholders and build coalitions and partnerships for influencing public health outcomes. (12) Students should be able to write and deliver effective testimony.
  • This course is required for the school-wide core curriculum

PUBHLTH514: Public Health Sciences and the Environment

  • Graduate level
  • Residential and Online MPH and Online MS
  • This is a first year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for residential students; Winter term(s) for online MPH students; Winter term(s) for online MS students.
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MPH students; 2 credit hour(s) for online MS students;
  • Instructor(s): Neitzel, Richard (Residential); Neitzel, Richard (Online MPH); Neitzel, Richard (Online MS);
  • Prerequisites: MPH, MHI, or MHSA Residential Students Only or By Instructor Permission
  • Description: Many public health outcomes are directly influenced by human contact with the environment. This course will explore an important discipline within public health, environmental health sciences- that is, the study of how environmental factors affect human health and disease. We will apply environmental health and systems thinking principles to evaluate several major threats to public health: climate change, the built environment, and environmental justice issues. We will also assess the effectiveness of policies designed to address and reduce the threats presented by these and other issues.
  • Learning Objectives: After completion of the course, students should be able to: --Explain the critical importance of evidence in advancing public health knowledge (CEPH LO 6)--Explain effects of environmental factors on a population's health (CEPH LO 7, linked to competency M1, CEPH C15) --Explain how globalization affects global burdens of disease (CEPH LO 11, linked to competency CEPH C22) --Apply process mapping methods to systematically evaluate the generation and movement of environmental hazards on the public (linked to competency CEPH C22) --Explain the impact of pollution control policies on public health outcomes (linked to competency CEPH C15) --Explain how environmental and occupational exposures can be measured and connected to human health (linked to competency M1) --Explain why a focus on sensitive and vulnerable groups is critical in environmental health science (linked to competency CEPH C15) --Explain strategies that can be applied to reduce environmental and occupational hazards
  • This course is required for the school-wide core curriculum
Concentration Competencies that PUBHLTH514 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
Population and Health Sciences MS Demonstrate knowledge of the major issues and current research problems in population health using at least two key disciplines (e.g., biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health, nutritional science). PUBHLTH511, PUBHLTH512, PUBHLTH514, PUBHLTH515

PUBHLTH515: Population Health

  • Graduate level
  • Online MPH only
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for online MPH students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for online MPH students;
  • Instructor(s): Kardia, Sharon (Online MPH); Kardia, Sharon (Online MS);
  • Prerequisites: Biostat501 or higher, PubHlth 512 or higher
  • Advisory Prerequisites: Pubhlth511
  • Description: This course is intended to serve as an introduction to population health from both the vantage point of both public health and healthcare. We will examine the key components of community health needs assessments, how they are used, and how to compare population health assessments across subpopulations and time. We will also explore the epidemiological sources and criteria by which to select high quality data sources to estimate population health indicators and to select evidence-based interventions to improve population health. Finally, we will design of multisector collaborations that support the phases of population health improvement. As a survey of the population health, the course provides an overview for students wishing no more than an introduction to the field, as well as good grounding for students who wish to pursue additional coursework in population health.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Explain differences between population health assessments for public health and healthcare. 2. Understand the key components of community health needs assessments (CHNA). 3. Analyze how public health and healthcare will use a CHNA to improve population health. 4. Estimate key population health indicators for social determinants of health, chronic disease outcomes, and opioid abuse. 5. Categorize data sources by epidemiologic criteria. 6. Analyze differences between subpopulations and across time trends. 7. Design multisector collaborations that support population health improvement. 8. Outline a plan for population health improvement. 9. Recommend evidence-based interventions based on epidemiologic criteria and community suitability.
Concentration Competencies that PUBHLTH515 Allows Assessment On
Department Program Degree Competency Specific course(s) that allow assessment
Population and Health Sciences MPH Analyze the focus and function of population health assessments between public health and health care systems across local, state, and national settings PUBHLTH515
Population and Health Sciences MPH Compare population health indicators across subpopulations, time, and data sources PUBHLTH515, BIOSTAT592, EPID590, EPID592, EPID643, BIOSTAT595, BIOSTAT501
Population and Health Sciences MPH Estimate population health indicators from high quality data resources from diverse sources PUBHLTH515, EPID643, NUTR590, BIOSTAT592, BIOSTAT501
Population and Health Sciences MPH Design multisector collaborations that will support all phases of population health improvement (assessment, planning, implementation, evaluation) PUBHLTH515, HBEHED590, HBEHED591, PUBHLTH511
Population and Health Sciences MPH Recommend evidence-based interventions that engage broad and diverse community stakeholders for population health improvement PUBHLTH515, EPID591, NUTR597, PUBHLTH511
Population and Health Sciences MS Demonstrate knowledge of the major issues and current research problems in population health using at least two key disciplines (e.g., biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health, nutritional science). PUBHLTH511, PUBHLTH512, PUBHLTH514, PUBHLTH515
Population and Health Sciences MS Critically evaluate research reports and publications. PUBHLTH511, PUBHLTH511, PUBHLTH515
Population and Health Sciences MS Apply methodological skills needed to plan, conduct, critique and/or research population health issues and solutions. BIOSTAT591, PUBHLTH511, PUBHLTH512, PUBHLTH515, PUBHLTH682, PUBHLTH683

PUBHLTH516: Leadership Skills for Interprofessional Practice

  • Graduate level
  • Both Residential and Online MPH
  • This is a second year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for residential students; Winter term(s) for online MPH students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students; 1 credit hour(s) for online MPH students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: PUBHLTH 516 is an accelerated 7-week course that highlights foundational leadership skills needed by public health professionals to effectively work in interprofessional teams. Course themes include self-reflection on leadership style, growth mindset, fostering collaboration, motivating teams to accomplish goals, leading change, and guiding decision making.
  • Learning Objectives: Students should be able to: 1. Identify their leadership style. 2. Explain the importance of active learning and resilience in strengthening leadership skills. 3. Understand leadership structures across health sectors and the roles of public health professionals in leading change. 4. Describe the key domains of interprofessional practice. 5. Develop a mission, vision, and values to guide the work of teams. 6. Describe strategies to foster collaboration among interprofessional groups. 7. Compare strategies for motivating and influencing teams to accomplish goals. 8. Explain the relationship between leadership and learning through growth mindset principles. 9. Describe how interpersonal agility inspires risk-taking and collaboration.
  • This course is required for the school-wide core curriculum

PUBHLTH554: Applications in Global Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Prerequisites: School of Public Health Graduate Student
  • Description: This course is intended to serve as an introduction to the major issues of global public health through an investigation of global public health data sources and primary literature. Students will learn to aggregate available information convey public health data in a concise and meaningful format.

PUBHLTH615: Public Health in Action: National

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: An intensive course to prepare students for a culminating week-long practice-based experience designed to address existing and emerging public health priorities as defined by the respective communities and their academic partners. Students will be engaged directly with communities and exposed to the contextual, cultural, political and economic factors impacting health.

PUBHLTH616: Public Health in Action: International

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: Permission by Instructor
  • Description: An intensive course to prepare students for a culminating week-long international practice-based experience designed to address existing and emerging public health priorities as defined by the respective communities and their academic partners. Students will be engaged directly and exposed to the contextual, cultural, political and economic factors impacting health.

PUBHLTH622: Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Public Health: New Business Models for a public health economy

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s):
  • Not offered 2022-2023
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course builds on the premise that in order to improve the public's health, we need to create a new economy - a public health economy. To develop new business models for improving public health we need to understand the role innovation plays in business generally and startup culture specifically.

PUBHLTH681: Applied Practice and Integrative Experience II

  • Graduate level
  • Online MPH only
  • This is a first year course for Online students
  • Winter term(s) for online MPH students;
  • 2 credit hour(s) for online MPH students;
  • Instructor(s): August, Ella Kardia, Sharon (Online MPH);
  • Prerequisites: PubHlth 512, Biostats 501
  • Description: Students will continue with research, analysis, evaluation and writing to complete their capstone project. They will also explore different professional writing format.
  • Learning Objectives: Objectives: - Complete integrated learning experience project, through research, analysis and evaluation - Produce a written capstone in a professional format - Understand how to tailor written product (aka your capstone) to a specific audience (intended readers of student's work) - Be able to develop effective written and oral communications - Get practice using conventions specific to practice-based and/or academic writing - Further develop writing process through reflection and trying new approaches - Revise own writing based on feedback from advisor - Explain the critical importance of evidence in advancing public health knowledge

PUBHLTH741: Interdisciplinary Problem Solving

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-3 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Advisory Prerequisites: graduate standing
  • Description: "Interdisciplinary Problem Solving" is a course offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). Through a team-based, experiential, and interdisciplinary learning model, small groups of U-M graduate and professional students work with faculty to explore and offer solutions to emerging, complex problems.
  • Learning Objectives: Will vary term to term
  • This course is cross-listed with LAW741/PUBPOL710/SW741 in the Law School, Public Policy, Social Work department.

PUBHLTH796: Special Topics in Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Residential
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s) for residential students;
  • 1-5 credit hour(s) for residential students;
  • Instructor(s): Staff (Residential);
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course will be used by faculty members to teach special or emerging topics related to Public Health. The specific material and format will vary by semester and instructor.
  • Learning Objectives: Will vary by topic and instructor.