Environmental Health Sciences Courses Taught by Staff

EHS550: Introduction to Occupational and Environmental Health

  • Graduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Not offered 2018-2019
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status or Senior Standing
  • Description: Discussion of the basic concepts of occupational and environmental hygiene; recognition and evaluation of chemical,physical and biological hazards; the human environment; control hierarchies, strategies and technologies; personal protection; criteria and standards; the international dimension; and ethical issues. The course provides basic underpinnings of the nature of theory and practice in occupational and environmental hygiene, and thus provides a structural framework for thinking about the field, identifying linkages between disciplines and specialties, and providing a platform for more advanced study in the individual areas listed. The course is offered as a three-credit course in both the regular term and in the OJ/OC format.

EHS556: Occupational Ergonomics

  • Graduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Offered every other year
  • Last offered Winter 2017
  • Description: Principles, concepts and procedures concerned with worker performance, health and safety. Topics include: biomechanics, job safety, anthropometry, work physiology, psychophysics, work stations, tools, work procedures, work standards, Musculoskeletal disorders, noise, vibration, heat stress and the analysis and design of work.

EHS578: Practical Projects

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Practical Projects in the application of theory and principles of Environmental Health Sciences in public health settings. Course requirements include an approved practical work experience related to Environmental Health Sciences in consultation with a faculty advisor. May be elected more than once. Enrollment limited to Environmental Health Sciences majors with at least two full terms of prior registration.

EHS588: Environmental Law (SNRE 475)

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Introduces students to Environmental Law and the impact of the legal process on decisions that affect the environment. Topics include common law tort actions, toxic tort actions, statutory controls of pollution and other environmentally harmful activities. Additional areas include administrative agency structure and performance, Constitutional rights to environmental quality and more.

EHS651: Occupational Health, Safety and Environmental Program Management

  • Graduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2017
  • Description: This course introduces future leaders of plant and corporate level occupational health, safety and environmental programs to the breadth of functions and activities routinely performed by OHSE managers. Among the topics discussed are: OHSE organization structure and staffing, management systems, program content and metrics, budgeting, risk management, incident investigation and management, emergency preparedness and response, regulatory compliance, legal systems, health and safety culture, and prevention through design processes.
  • Course Goals: Students who have taken this course are expected to achieve a set of learning objectives by acquiring knowledge about key concepts, principles, ideas and facts. In addition, they are expected to acquire a set of competencies reflecting skills relevant to the practice of occupational and environmental health. The following tables summarize these expectations.
  • Competencies: Describe the role and scope of OHSE programs (1) Implement OHSE audit programs and protocols, including conformance with ANSI Z10 and ISO 14000 requirements. (2) Develop and defend program budgets, and justify projects aimed at meeting OHSE objectives. (3) Write OHSE policies and action plans, and set measurable performance goals for organizations. (4) Understand and communicate effectively with insurance brokers and underwriters. (5) Participate effectively in workers compensation case management. (6) Conduct and evaluate basic accident/incident investigations. (7) Lead the development of simple emergency preparedness and response plans. 8) Describe regulatory processes and provide compliance advice to professionals outside of the OHSE domain. (9) Properly maintain an OSHA 300 log. (10) Describe basic legal proceedings and participate in lawsuit discovery processes. (11) Provide process leadership in product stewardship, prevention through design, and other engineering processes aimed at reducing hazard and liability exposures. (12) Identify factors affecting OHSE culture within an organization. (13) Develop a training matrix for an organization based on regulatory compliance and needs analysis. (14) Successfully manage a plant level OHSE program, or contribute significantly to the management of OHSE functions at the corporate level.
  • Learning Objectives: Students will gain a fundamental understanding of: (1) How OHSE programs are typically organized, the roles and responsibilities of OHSE managers, and expectations of other OHSE stakeholders in the organization. (2) Challenges associated with managing personnel and processes, including dealing with ethical issues, setting goals and measuring performance, hiring and training professionals, and managing consultants. (3) Financial aspects of program management, such as risk management and insurance, budgeting, workers compensation, and legal liability for both corporate activities and products. (4) Incident investigation and management, as well as emergency planning and response management. (5) Regulatory rulemaking, inspections, and compliance management processes.

EHS670: Applications in Environmental Epidemiology

  • Graduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: EPID 601, EPID 655, EHS 656
  • Description: Students will complete an independent reseach project under faculty supervision. Students will apply epidemiological and statistical methods to the analysis of data from epidemiological, exposure assessment or laboratory studies. This course focuses on the conduct of independent research and sceintfic writing under faculty guidance. Course must be elected for 3 credits. This course is the final course of three, in which students plan their field experience (EHS 659), complete their field experience and present a poster to the department (EHS 600), then conduct data analyses and prepare a research report (EHS 670). It is part of the Capstone experience for Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Students.

EHS697: Readings

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr
  • Description: Supervised study/review of a selected topic in environmental health, occupational health, nutrition and/or toxicology. May be elected more than once for a maximum of six credits.

EHS698: Research

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Original research investigation of a special topic in environmental health, occupational health, nutrition and/or toxicology. May be elected more than once for a maximum of six credits.

EHS699: Master's Thesis

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm of Thesis Advisor
  • Description: This course shall be elected by students enrolled in Master's degree programs that require a formal written thesis as a condition of program completion. The thesis shall be defended in front of the student's thesis committee. The course grade will reflect the student's accomplishments relative to the thesis and its defense. The course is to be elected only once.

EHS717: Toxicological Pathology Laboratory

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: EHS 616 or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: This laboratory course will provide an introduction to the histopathology associated with chemical exposures. Students will perform routine histological maneuvers on tissues from rats treated with “unknown” chemicals. Following microscopic inspection of tissues, students will describe the pathological process produced in each tissue and will identify the class of (or specific) chemical to which the organism was exposed.

EHS796: Special Topics in Environmental Health Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Lecture, seminars and readings selected on a current or emerging topic or theme in the environmental health sciences. The specific material and format will vary by semester and instructor.

EHS899: Advanced Research

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Original investigations of a specific topic in environmental health, occupational health, nutrition and/or toxicology. Designed for doctoral students performing research prior to passing their qualifying exam. May be elected more than once.

EHS990: Dissertation/Pre-Candidacy

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to status as candidate.

EHS995: Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students who have been admitted to status as candidate.

PUBHLTH340: Sustainability and Environmental Health

  • Undergraduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Batterman, Stuart; Jolliet, Olivier; Staff;
  • Not offered 2018-2019
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course links environmental health and sustainability issues with the goal of developing sustainable strategies. It addresses environmental health determinants, underlying drivers and stressors, environmental metrics, exposures and impacts, assessment tools, and sustainable solutions. These concepts are applied to sustainable and healthy cities, transportation, food, energy, and consumer product systems.
  • Course Goals: 1. To understand the major risk factors that affect human and global environmental health. 2. To critically identify key drivers, stresses and health impacts associated with main domains of consumption and human activity. 3. To understand the analytical methods and underlying science used to evaluate sustainability, assess human health impacts, and contrast footprints (e.g., for carbon, water). 4. To be able to formulate the key principles leading towards sustainable and healthy solutions for the major domains of consumption and human activity.
  • Competencies: The proposed course will enable students: 1) To be able to identify major human health risk factors and their underlying causes, including environmental and nutritional determinant factors that impact human health status; 2) To be able to define, analyze and interpret principles of sustainable production and consumption in specific domains; 3) To be able to apply life cycle-based footprint tools and other metrics to quantify sustainability and health impact of products, organizations, and systems; and 4) To be able to define sustainability goals, interpret appropriate metrics, and apply problem solving skills at organizational or corporate levels.
  • Learning Objectives: *This course contributes in particular to the following undergraduate competencies and program domains: a) Science of Exposure and Human Health: it explains the underlying sciences and relationship between sustainable consumption and human health, proposing environmental metrics, exposure and impact assessment tools, and addressing opportunities for preventing impacts and protecting health across the life course. b) Determinants of Health: This course describes the underlying drivers and stressors, as well as the environmental health and nutritional determinant factors that impact human health status. c) Problem Solving: Student will develop and apply problem-solving skills to develop sustainable solutions applicable to sustainable and healthy cities, transportation, food, energy, and consumer product systems.