Environmental Health Sciences Courses Taught by Stuart Batterman

EHS510: Responsible Conduct in Research and Scholarship

  • Graduate level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Batterman, Stuart
  • Description: Responsible Conduct in Research and Scholarship --- This course provides training in 8 modules: (1) Research and Academic Misconduct; (2) Intellectual Property; (3) Responsible Authorship and Publications; (4) Human Subject Research and IRBs; (5) Animal Use and Care; (6) Mentor/Mentee Relationships; (7) Conflict of interest; and (8) Research and Scholarship in Society and the Global Marketplace.
  • Course Goals: The course has two primary goals: 1. To provide MPH, MS, and PhD students, as well as postdoctoral fellows, in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences with comprehensive training in the responsible conduct of research and scholarship. 2. To fulfill the NIH and NSF mandates for individual and institutional grant holders to trainall personnel supported by these awards in RCRS practices.
  • Competencies: To understand and follow the highest standards of integrity and professional conduct in eight key areas: 1. Research and Academic Misconduct - Fraud, Fabrication, and Plagiarism 2. Intellectual Property - Data Storage and Ownership 3. Responsible Authorship and Publications - Peer Review 4. Human Subjects Research and IRBs 5. Animal Use and Care - Laboratory Safety and Responsibilities 6. Mentor/Mentee Relationships 7. Conflict of Interest - Personal, Professional, and Financial 8. Research and Scholarship in Society and in the Global Workplace
  • Learning Objectives: Responsible Conduct in Research and Scholarship --- This course provides training in 8 modules: (1) Research and Academic Misconduct; (2) Intellectual Property; (3) Responsible Authorship and Publications; (4) Human Subject Research and IRBs; (5) Animal Use and Care; (6) Mentor/Mentee Relationships; (7) Conflict of interest; and (8) Research and Scholarship in Society and the Global Marketplace.

EHS540: Sustainability and Environmental Health

  • Graduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Jolliet, Olivier; Batterman, Stuart;
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course links environmental health and sustainability issues with the goal of developing sustainable strategies. It addresses environmental health determinants, underlying drivers and stressors, environmental metrics, exposures and impacts, assessment tools, and sustainable solutions. These concepts are applied to sustainable and healthy cities, transportation, food, energy, and consumer product systems.
  • Course Goals: 1. To understand the major risk factors that affect human and global environmental health. 2. To critically identify key drivers, stresses and health impacts associated with main domains of consumption and human activity. 3. To understand the analytical methods and underlying science used to evaluate sustainability, assess human health impacts, and contrast footprints (e.g., for carbon, water). 4. To be able to formulate the key principles leading towards sustainable and healthy solutions for the major domains of consumption and human activity.
  • Competencies: The proposed course will enable students: 1) To be able to identify major human health risk factors and their underlying causes, including environmental and nutritional determinant factors that impact human health status; 2) To be able to define, analyze and interpret principles of sustainable production and consumption in specific domains; 3) To be able to apply life cycle-based footprint tools and other metrics to quantify sustainability and health impact of products, organizations, and systems; and 4) To be able to define sustainability goals, interpret appropriate metrics, and apply problem-solving skills at organizational or corporate levels.
  • Learning Objectives: *This course contributes in particular to the following undergraduate competencies and program domains: a) Science of Exposure and Human Health: it explains the underlying sciences and relationship between sustainable consumption and human health, proposing environmental metrics, exposure and impact assessment tools, and addressing opportunities for preventing impacts and protecting health across the life course. b) Determinants of Health: This course describes the underlying drivers and stressors, as well as the environmental health and nutritional determinant factors that impact human health status. c) Problem Solving: Student will develop and apply problem-solving skills to develop sustainable solutions applicable to sustainable and healthy cities, transportation, food, energy, and consumer product systems.
  • This course is cross-listed with PUBHLTH 440 in the SPH undergraduate program department.

EHS572: Environmental Impact Assessment (NRE 514)

  • Graduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Batterman, Stuart
  • Prerequisites: EHS 574, Grad Status
  • Description: A comprehensive framework for predicting and evaluating environmental impacts is presented. The course emphasizes the theory, application, integration and evaluation of models simulating transport and fate of contaminants in air, surface and ground water, and soil. Case studies and computer exercises demonstrate contemporary exposure and health risk assessment problems.
  • This course is cross-listed with NRE514 in the NRE department.
  • Syllabus for EHS572

PUBHLTH340: Sustainability and Environmental Health

  • Undergraduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Batterman, Stuart; Jolliet, Olivier; Staff;
  • Not offered 2018-2019
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course links environmental health and sustainability issues with the goal of developing sustainable strategies. It addresses environmental health determinants, underlying drivers and stressors, environmental metrics, exposures and impacts, assessment tools, and sustainable solutions. These concepts are applied to sustainable and healthy cities, transportation, food, energy, and consumer product systems.
  • Course Goals: 1. To understand the major risk factors that affect human and global environmental health. 2. To critically identify key drivers, stresses and health impacts associated with main domains of consumption and human activity. 3. To understand the analytical methods and underlying science used to evaluate sustainability, assess human health impacts, and contrast footprints (e.g., for carbon, water). 4. To be able to formulate the key principles leading towards sustainable and healthy solutions for the major domains of consumption and human activity.
  • Competencies: The proposed course will enable students: 1) To be able to identify major human health risk factors and their underlying causes, including environmental and nutritional determinant factors that impact human health status; 2) To be able to define, analyze and interpret principles of sustainable production and consumption in specific domains; 3) To be able to apply life cycle-based footprint tools and other metrics to quantify sustainability and health impact of products, organizations, and systems; and 4) To be able to define sustainability goals, interpret appropriate metrics, and apply problem solving skills at organizational or corporate levels.
  • Learning Objectives: *This course contributes in particular to the following undergraduate competencies and program domains: a) Science of Exposure and Human Health: it explains the underlying sciences and relationship between sustainable consumption and human health, proposing environmental metrics, exposure and impact assessment tools, and addressing opportunities for preventing impacts and protecting health across the life course. b) Determinants of Health: This course describes the underlying drivers and stressors, as well as the environmental health and nutritional determinant factors that impact human health status. c) Problem Solving: Student will develop and apply problem-solving skills to develop sustainable solutions applicable to sustainable and healthy cities, transportation, food, energy, and consumer product systems.