Courses Taught by Kendrin Sonneville

NUTR621 Eating Disorders Prevention & Treatment

  • Graduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Sonneville, Kendrin
  • Offered every year
  • Last offered Fall 2016
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Course Goals: This course is designed to introduce students to eating disorders using a public health framework. By critically discussing both seminal and cutting-edge papers, students will develop a thorough understanding of eating disorder diagnoses and the epidemiology eating disorders, including risk factors and outcomes/prognosis Students will examine primary, secondary, and tertiary approaches to eating disorders prevention and will be exposed to topics relevant to public health, including integrating obesity and eating disorders prevention.
  • Competencies: • Understand the public health impact of eating disorders and related questions • Synthesize and interpret the scientific literature on eating disorders • Develop a basic understanding of tertiary prevention of eating disorders, including common treatment modalities

NUTR646 Approaches in Nutrition Counseling

  • Graduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Sonneville, Kendrin
  • Prerequisites: NUTR 636: Medical Nutrition Therapy I
  • Description: The aim of this course is to familiarize dietetics students with counseling strategies that can be used for nutrition behavior change. The course will emphasize both the art and the science of nutrition counseling, as well as the practical aspects of implementing counseling for dietary change.

NUTR796 Special Topics in Nutritional Sciences


NUTR802 Professional Development and Technical Writing

  • Graduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Sonneville, Kendrin
  • Prerequisites: EHS801
  • Description: Doctoral students must learn to think critically about their own writing, the writing of their peers, and the process of writing in general. This course will center on peer review, written critiques, and lectures from experts to build the skills necessary to craft a piece of writing with these elements.
  • Course Goals: At the end of the course, students should be able to: • Communicate public health research and its implications to a technical audience in a style that engages and connects with the reader. • Develop translatable writing skills for diverse career paths in science.
  • Competencies: Students taking this class are expected on its completion to: • Have a stronger grasp of the basic skills necessary for writing a scientific manuscript. • Understand the structure and expected content in scientific writing, including abstracts, reviews, and articles. • Understand how to critique the writing style, content, organization, and logic in their own and their peers' writing. • Take and give criticism constructively and use it to improve their writing. • Have a polished piece of writing that they can either submit for publication or use for their preliminary exam. • Have developed a regular writing routine that is productive for them.