Epidemiology Winter Term Courses

EPID299 Independent Research for Undergraduates

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Students do an independent microbiology research project under the supervision of afaculty member in the Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology program.
  • Course Goals: To teach students how to carry out scientific research in microbiology.
  • Competencies: Students are judged in how well they carry out their research projects, the effort they put into the process, and their grasp of the larger research goals.
  • Learning Objectives: Students learn both specific laboratory techniques and in general how to carryout independent research.

EPID399 Independent Research for Undergraduates

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr. and at least Junior status
  • Description: Students do an independent microbiology research project under the supervision of a faculty member in the Hospital & Molecular Epidemiology program.

EPID460 Introduction to Bacterial Pathogenesis

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Marrs, Carl F
  • Prerequisites: Introductory Microbiology and Genetics or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: This course covers the basics of the biochemistry, molecular biology, and genetics of chemotaxis and flagella, pili and adhesins, extracellular proteases, bacterial toxins, invasion and intracellular growth, phase and antigenic variation, gene transfer, LPS, iron, M-proteins, capsules, chemotherapy, antibiotic resistance and global regulation of virulence elements.
  • Syllabus for EPID460

EPID503 Strategies and Uses of Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Needham, Belinda; Kardia, Sharon; Adar, Sara; Karvonen-Gutierrez, Carrie; Mendes de Leon, Carlos;
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 501 or Biostat 521, and Graduate Status
  • Description: This course offers an introduction to the principles, concepts, and methods of population-based epidemiologic research. It is intended to be the introductory course for students who are NOT majoring in Epidemiology. The course is divided into three primary sections: introduction to the basic principles of epidemiology and the measures used in epidemiology; epidemiologic study design and analysis;special topics that are important to an introductory understanding of epidemiology.
  • Syllabus for EPID503

EPID507 Microbial Control: Sterilization, Disinfection and Manipulation

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Rickard, Alex
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: The influence of microorganisms on human-health is significant and control strategies often rely on the use of physical (heat, UV, etc) and chemical (antimicrobial, antibiofilm, etc) technologies. This course will focus on such endeavors with particular focus on broad acting antimicrobials (less emphasis on antibiotics) and new/remerging microbial control technologies.
  • Course Goals: This course has three main goals: (1) Familiarize students with first-line methods to control populations of microorganisms. These methods will be in contrast to the use of antibiotics. First-line methods that will be described include physical and chemical treatment strategies such as heat and filter sterilization, disinfectants, mechanisms and use of broad acting biocides, as well as new emerging technologies such as quorum sensing inhibitors (2) Introduce the concept of multi-species biofilm communities, their recalcitrance and ability to enhance selection of antimicrobial resistance. (3) Discuss strategies that are or could be adopted to enhance microbial control strategies in the domestic, public and medical setting.
  • Competencies: 2. D. Human Physiology and Pathology Knowledge 1.The biochemical and cellular basis for normal and pathological functioning 2.Interaction among anatomical systems and organs in health and disease. 3.The most important chronic, infectious, and degenerative diseases of humans in terms of the public's health 4.Pathobiology of major diseases integrated with the principles of epidemiology. 5.The impact of host characteristics (e.g., immune response, nutrition, presence of other diseases or infections) on disease outcomes

EPID513 Vaccine in Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Yang, Zhenhua
  • Prerequisites: PUBHLTH370 or EPID512
  • Description: This course introduces essential vaccinology, covering pre-clinical vaccine development, clinical trials, new vaccine licensing, immunization program design and evaluation. It also introduces population transmission dynamics concepts, and the impact of pathogen and human population diversity on vaccination. Recent advancements in major types of non-infectious vaccines will also be discussed.
  • This course is cross-listed with PUBHLTH413 in the PUBHLTH413 department.

EPID516 Genomics in Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Smith, Jennifer
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Epid 503 or equivalent; Epid 515 or equivalent; Biostat 503 or equivalent
  • Description: This course relates genomics to the core public health discipline of epidemiology emphasizing the use of genomics to help describe disease frequency and distribution and to gain insights into biological etiologies. Topics include genetic material in disease, in families and in populations; the investigation of multifactorial traits; model-based linkage analysis; model-free linkage analysis; segregation analysis; allele association and linkage disequilibrium; and gene-gene interactions and gene-environment interactions. Issues related to implementing studies are considered.

EPID521 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems for Public Health Research

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Pearce, C. Leigh
  • Prerequisites: EPID600
  • Description: This course is a practical guide for how to use GIS in your work as a public health professional and will provide an understanding for why incorporating geography into study design is critical to the translation of research findings into effective health policy.
  • Course Goals: Students learn to: •Articulate the relationship between various geographies, community stakeholders and their relevance to study design and translational research • Describe the basic structure of spatial data • Identify and use available sources of GIS data •Gain an introductory comprehension of GIS data management, mapping and analysis •Gain proficiency with using ESRI's ArcGIS • Effectively use GIS products to communicate with stakeholders and translate research findings into health policy recommendations.
  • Competencies: Foundational Competencies: Policy in Public Health (Propose strategies to identify stakeholders and build coalitions and partnerships for influencing public health outcomes); Evidence-based Approaches to Public Health (Analyze quantitative and Qualitative data using biostatistics, Informatics, Computer-based programming and software, as appropriate).
  • Learning Objectives: Foundational Learning Objective: Explain the critical importance of evidence in advancing public health knowledge.

EPID525 Clinical and Diagnostic Microbiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Newton, Duane
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: At least 1 prior microbiology course or permission of the instructor
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course describes methods used by clinical and public health microbiologists to detect clinically relevant microorganisms in patient specimens, and how this information is used in patient management. Students will gain an understanding of processes by which microbiology data is generated and its relevance to clinicians and epidemiologists.

EPID545 Molecular Techniques Laboratory

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Martin, Emily
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Molecular techniques used in bacteriology and molecular epidemiology. Techniques covered include PCR, gel electophoresis, recombinant DNA technology, microarrays, and bacterial typing procedures.
  • Syllabus for EPID545

EPID546 Advanced Virology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 2-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: EPID 543 and EPID 545
  • Description: Advanced laboratory studies of viruses and virus diseases with emphasis upon the application of procedures to investigation. May be elected more than once.

EPID555 Globalization and Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Wilson, Mark L
  • Last offered Winter 2013
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Description: This seminar explores the diverse health impacts of economic, environmental, and cultural globalization. The transnational movement of people, technologies, capital, commodities, toxins, pathogens, ideologies and treatments are affecting people's well-being through diverse pathways. Introductory lectures and discussion of readings will explore various topics related to these issues. We will study the forces of globalization, beneficial and harmful health impacts, role in economic development and resource distribution, and implications for public health practice.
  • Syllabus for EPID555

EPID562 Advanced Bacteriology Laboratory

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 2-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: EPID 560 and EPID 561 or Perm. Instr.I
  • Description: Individual laboratory studies of selected topics on bacteria of public health importance. May be elected more than once.

EPID565 Research in Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Offered every year
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Investigation of a selected problem planned and carried out by each student. Pertinent literature, investigational approaches, and progress in the investigations are discussed in seminars. May be taken more than once for up to six credits. Usually taken first for one credit. This is the Capstone Course for Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology Students.

EPID578 Practical Projects in Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Fall 2016
  • Description: A period of elective (i.e., non-required) practical projects for international students in Epidemiology. Students work for at least eight weeks in an approved agency. Course requirements include this approved practical work experience related to the student's field of study plus prior and concurrent consultation with the student's faculty advisor. Restricted to Epidemiology majors with at least two full consecutive terms of enrollment.

EPID582 Molecular Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Martin, Emily
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: EPID 503 or EPID 600
  • Description: The rapid development in molecular techniques since the early 1980's has enhanced the ability of epidemiologists to define and measure both exposures and outcomes. In this course, we will explore the impact of these measures on the design, conduct and analysis of epidemiologic studies by examining successful and unsuccessful applications of these new measurement tools. We will also discuss the ethical issues arising from an enhanced ability to identify individuals with early stage of disease, increased susceptibility or to measure very low levels of exposure in the environment, and sensitize students to the potential conflicts in research ethics arising from collaborative research projects.

EPID602 EPID Methods II: Applied Epidemiologic Data Analysis

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Baylin, Ana
  • Last offered Fall 2016
  • Prerequisites: Epid 600; or permission of the instructor.
  • Description: A practicum in epidemiologic data analysis designed to integrate and apply concepts learned in previous biostatistics and epidemiologic methods courses. Students learn practical skills to analyze and interpret epidemiologic data with continuous and dichotomous outcome variables through lectures and hands-on exercises.

EPID603 Professional Development Seminar

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Pearce, C. Leigh
  • Description: EPID 603 is a two-semester seminar course to be taken by OEE, GE, and GHE students in the fall and winter semesters in year one. Students are exposed to various topics such as self-assessment, professional communication, responsible research, and career planning.

EPID604 Applications of Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
  • Description: Application of epidemiological methods and concepts to analysis of data from epidemiological, clinical or laboratory studies. Introduction to independent research and scientific writing under faculty guidance.
  • Syllabus for EPID604

EPID608 Environmental Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): O'Neill, Marie
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Epid 600 or 503, Biostat 553 or 503
  • Description: This course will serve as an introduction to topics in environmental epidemiology, covering major areas of current inquiry in this field. It will convey the basic tools required to critically read the literature and to develop appropriate study designs in light of intended applications. The class meeting will include lectures and student-led discussions. This course will review epidemiologic methods used in evaluating the health effects of physical, biological and chemical agents in the environment and the available evidence on the health effects of such exposures. We will also consider policy and public health applications of the scientific evidence. Topics include lectures on methodology and major environmental exposures, discussions based on review and critiques of current literature, and presentations by outside experts on specific environmental epidemiology issues of current interest. After taking this course, students should have a better understanding of the scope, limitations, applications and future of environmental epidemiology.
  • This course is cross-listed with EHS/EPID 608 in the SPH Environmental Health Sciences department.

EPID609 Vaccines in Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Yang, Zhenhua
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: EHS 513 or equiv.
  • Description: Vaccines represent the most cost-effective medial intervention that has made a major effect on mortality reduction and population growth. This course will cover the epidemiological, statistical, biological, microbiologic, immunological principles, approaches and methods used in vaccine development and vaccination program design. Through a detailed discussion of the pathobiology, epidemiology, vaccine, and vaccination program design of a selected group of vaccine preventable diseases, the course will introduce the students to the major types of infectious diseases defined by the types of pathogens, the different transmission mechanisms of infectious diseases, the concept of population transmission dynamics, and the basic types of population effects of vaccination. Current issues and challenges in vaccine development and immunization practice will als be discussed.

EPID617 Social epidemiology II: Social and economic determinants of population health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Clarke, Philippa
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: EPID 514 or permission of instructor
  • Description: The objective of this course is to examine, in depth, some of the key social determinants of health in populations. The course is organized around substantive topic areas (e.g. obesity, disability, mental health, youth and substance abuse, stress and social support, neighborhoods and environments), with a focus on understanding the role of social factors in shaping health. The course draws heavily on epidemiologic perspectives and methods as tools to improve our understanding of population health, and is designed to expose students to different methodological approaches and their strengths/limitations in defining population health, understanding its determinants, and assessing the mechanisms by which these determinants influence population health. The course is a combination of lectures and student discussions, with an emphasis on class participation.

EPID621 Cancer Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mondul, Alison
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600, EPID 503, or PhD standing
  • Description: The course will review the socio-demographic magnitude of cancer, basic concepts of cancer biology and the causes of cancer. Methods for evaluating genetic factors, tobacco, alcohol, radiation, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, viruses and nutrition will be reviewed in lectures and by classroom discussion of selected publications.

EPID624 Readings in Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Review of literature on selected subjects under guidance of individual faculty members and through scheduled seminars at which reports are presented. May be elected more than once.

EPID625 Controversial topics in the role of nutrition on chronic disease

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Baylin, Ana
  • Last offered Fall 2016
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600 or EPID503 AND BIOSTAT 501 or BIOSTAT 521
  • Description: This public health-oriented course will provide students the opportunity to advance their knowledge in nutrition and chronic disease research from a population perspective and help them to better interpret epidemiologic studies on nutrition and chronic disease.
  • This course is cross-listed with EPID625/NUTR626 in the Epidemiology and Nutritional Sciences department.
  • Syllabus for EPID625

EPID626 Epidemiology, Health Services & Policy

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Morgenstern, Hal
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Description: This course deals with selected applications of epidemiologic methods and findings to public-health and clinical practice. Class topics include utilization and quality of medical care, health needs assessment, health impact estimation, evaluation and economic analysis of interventions, systematic reviews and meta analysis, risk assessment and health policy. The major objective is to provide a framework for integrating causal inference and decision making, thereby bridging the gap between science and practice. Emphasis is given to conceptual and methodologic issues that confront researchers, health planners, policy analysts, and decision makers.
  • Course Goals: 1. To provide a framework for integrating causal inference with decision making, thereby bridging the gap between science and both public-health and clinical practice. 2. To become familiar with different approaches for applying epidemiologic principles and methods to health-services, evaluative, and policy research. 3. To understand the barriers and challenges for translating epidemiologic findings into public policy.
  • Competencies: Following the completion of this course, the student will be able to perform the following activities at a basic level: collect relevant information and data to estimate the potential impact of a planned intervention on one or more health outcomes; design a study to evaluate the health effect and cost-effectiveness of an intervention in a target population; critique publications dealing with health-services, outcomes, or clinical research, based on sound scientific principles, and conduct a systematic review; and conduct an analysis of a policy that depends in part on epidemiologic evidence.
  • Learning Objectives: Following the completion of this course, the student will be able to do the following at a professional level expected in the workplace: describe the connections between epidemiologic and health-services research; describe and compare alternative approaches for identifying predictors of healthcare utilization; describe alternative methods and limitations for measuring the quality of care and comparing quality across patient, provider, or institutional populations; describe approaches for measuring the need for health services in populations; describe the counterfactual (potential outcomes) method for estimating the expected impact of a planned population intervention; describe and compare experimental, quasi-experimental, and observational methods for evaluating the impact of interventions on population health; describe and compare benefit-cost analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis; describe the components and problems of risk assessment; describe nontechnical aspects of risk evaluation including risk acceptability and perception; and describe barriers and challenges of translating empirical findings into public policy.

EPID634 Foundations in infectious disease transmission modeling

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Eisenberg, Joseph
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600, BIOSTATS 503, 553, or another course that provides a similar background in probability and statistics
  • Description: Infectious disease transmission modeling provides a theoretical framework for the field of infectious disease epidemiology; i.e., it provides a basis for thinking about study design, data analysis, and decision making. This course will serve as an introduction to infectious disease transmission modeling, teaching more quantitative concepts of disease transmission.

EPID636 Cancer Risk and Epidemiology Modeling

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Meza Rodriguez, Rafael
  • Last offered Fall 2015
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 560 or permission from the instructor
  • Description: This course will introduce 1) the concepts of multistage carcinogenesis and the analysis of cancer epidemiology using mathematical models of carcinogenesis; 2) the analysis of cancer prevention strategies using Markov cancer natural history models. Students will learn how to develop and fit multistage and cancer natural history models in R.

EPID637 Systems Modeling of Behavior, Social Processes and Chronic Disease

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Meza Rodriguez, Rafael
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Description: This advanced course provides in-depth coverage of applications of mathematical modeling to behavior, social processes, and chronic disease. We will review applications of agent-based and network modeling in social and behavioral science, and natural history models of chronic diseases. Students will learn to develop models in R, NetLogo, and NetworkX.

EPID641 Measurement Theory and Instrument Design

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mendes de Leon, Carlos
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600
  • Description: Measurement of Health-Related Risk Factors and Outcomes
  • Course Goals: To provide an introduction of measurement theory and applications of a variety of health-related risk factors and outcomes in epidemiologic research, and basic principles in the design of measurement instruments; to provide oral and written accounts of the results of the application and analysis of a specific measurement method;
  • Competencies: This course will allow students to attain the following Departmental MPH core competencies (List 1-10): 8.Be familiar with basic aspects of field methods in epidemiology (e.g. human subject protection, data collection and management, survey design, sampling strategies, calculating power, and public health surveillance). 9.Demonstrate effective communication of epidemiologic findings in written and oral formats.

EPID642 Sampling and Power

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Park, Sung Kyun
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600 (or equivalent), EPID 640 (or equivalent), and BIOSTAT 503 or 553 (or equivalent)
  • Description: This course introduces 1) various sampling methods (simple random sampling, stratified sampling, cluster sampling, convenience sampling, control sampling strategies in case-control design) and 2) power and sample size calculations. This course consists of lectures and hands-on exercises in computer labs, homework assignments, and a final project.
  • Course Goals: The goal of this course is to learn about how to design surveys with appropriate sampling methods widely used in epidemiologic research and how to compute sample sizes and/or powers given different epidemiologic study designs.
  • Competencies: After completing this class, students are expected to be able to attain the following competencies: Be familiar with basic aspects of field methods in epidemiology (e.g. human subject protection, data collection and management, survey design, sampling strategies, calculating power, and public health surveillance). Specifically, students will be able to: o Choose and design appropriate sampling methods for different epidemiologic study designs. o Compute sample size and/or power for different epidemiologic study designs.
  • Syllabus for EPID642

EPID651 Epidemiology and Public Health Management of Disasters

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2013
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Description: Introduction to the evolving role of public health and epidemiology in disaster preparedness and response. It uses epidemiological principles to develop skills relevant to disaster preparedness, planning and relief/recovery efforts. Students acquire skills to assess risk and evaluate impacts after disasters, and work on a local health department preparedness project.

EPID655 Epidemiologic Field Investigations in Infection Control

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Foxman, Betsy
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600 or equivalent, Epid 640, Biostat 503 or 553,EPID 600 or Perm. Instr.,EPID 600 or equivalent, Epid 640, Biostat 503 or 553,EPID 600 or Perm. Instr.,EPID 600 or equivalent, Epid 640, Biostat 501 or 521, EPID 600 or Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Formulation of study goals, selection of epidemiologic parameters, sampling strategies, questionnaire design and administration, database construction, entry and validation, interpretation of univariate and bivariate results. Student groups design and execute a pilot field study.

EPID664 Field Methods in Epidemiology for Developing Countries

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Eisenberg, Joseph
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Epid 503 or Epid 600
  • Description: This course is for students and researchers interested in pursuing collaborative epidemiologic research in international settings. The course will focus on steps and procedures for setting up and conducting international epidemiologic studies. Topics will include relationship between research groups and host country policy makers and collaborators, cultural and logistical differences between research studies in the U.S. and international settings. Other topics will include developing and maintaining research infrastructure, research design, field operations, anticipated obstacles, monitoring, ethical and IRB requirement for international studies, funding, and plans for maintaining future collaborations. Occasional guest lecturers, actively involved in international epidemiologic research will be integrated into the syllabus.

EPID665 Research Seminar in International Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): O'Neill, Marie
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.; restricted to 2nd year Epidemiology International Health MPH students
  • Description: The seminar provides a forum for the discussion of capstone research projects in international health. Students in both the General Epidemiology and the Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology tracks of the International Health Program present their research findings. In addition, the seminar includes presentations of international health research by other speakers from the University and elsewhere.

EPID666 Health and Socioeconomic Development

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Stein, Howard
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Description: Reviews links between health conditions and socioeconomic development in low-income countries and trends in health and development indicators; socio-economic determinants of health, including poverty and income, education, nutrition, fertility, and culture and behavior; impact of globalization in terms of neo-liberal policies, trade and capital flows and the urbanization and their growth of the informal economy; examines the effects of health changes on economic growth and development.
  • This course is cross-listed with 662 in the CAAS department.

EPID675 Data Analysis for Environmental Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Park, Sung Kyun
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 560 and EPID 503 or 600
  • Description: This course will introduce non-parametric smoothing methods, such as splines, locally weighted polynomial regression (LOESS) and generalized additive models (GAM), and focus on continuous environmental exposure variables. It will also deal with analysis of multi-level data including analyses of longitudinal data and complex sampling data, and time-series analysis that are widely used in environmental epidemiology. The course will cover how to handle limits of detection in environmental exposure data. It will provide an opportunity to analyze actual population data to learn how to model environmental epidemiologic data, and is designed particularly for students who pursue environmental epidemiologic research. The course will consist of lectures and hands-on practices in computer labs, homework assignments and final projects. R, a free software environment for statistical computing and graphics, will be used.
  • This course is cross-listed with EHS675 in the Environmental Health Sciences department.
  • Syllabus for EPID675

EPID679 Epidemiology of Psychiatric and Substance Use Disorders

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mezuk, Briana
  • Description: Introduces the epidemiology of psychiatric and substance use disorders. Addresses conceptual and methodological considerations in psychiatric research, descriptive and analytic epidemiology of common psychiatric and substance use disorders, and issues of classification and measurement for epidemiologic research. Students analyze epidemiologic data pertaining to psychiatric and substance use disorders.
  • Course Goals: The goal of this class is to learn the epidemiology for major psychiatric and substance use disorders over the life course, and to apply epidemiologic principles and methods to understand the predictors and consequences of psychiatric and substance use disorders.
  • Competencies: 1. Identify and describe population patterns of health-related risk factors and health-related outcomes in terms of person, place and time. 2. Be familiar with the current major public health issues and be able to identify and evaluate the determinants of these public health issues (e.g. demographic, pathophysiological, genetic, environmental, infectious, behavioral, and social). 3. Know the different epidemiologic study designs including the relative strengths and weaknesses of each, and be able to propose an appropriate design strategy when presented with a research question. 4. Demonstrate effective communication of epidemiologic findings in written and oral formats. 5. Be exposed to published epidemiologic studies and be able to critically appraise epidemiological findings.
  • Learning Objectives: Upon completing this course students will be able to: • Describe the epidemiology of the major psychiatric and substance use disorders of childhood, adulthood, and late adulthood • Understand epidemiologic methods used to assess psychiatric and substance use disorders in the community • Demonstrate the ability to critically assess epidemiologic data and scientific articles pertaining to psychiatric and substance use disorders • Demonstrate ability to obtain and analyze various epidemiologic data sources with information pertaining to psychiatric and substance use disorders • Prepare a scientific paper pertaining to epidemiology of psychiatric or substance use disorders • Improve public communication skills through class presentations and discussions

EPID680 Hospital Epidemiology I

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Yang, Zhenhua
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Description: The course provides an overview and essential knowledge in hospital epidemiology. It covers healthcare associated infection surveillance, prevention, and control, healthcare outcome assessment, and healthcare employee health promotion. The course also discusses important emerging issues in healthcare settings, which include antibiotics resistance, emerging infectious diseases, and biological disaster preparedness.

EPID684 Theory and applications of spatial epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Zelner, Jonathan
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 501 or BIOSTAT 521
  • Description: This course provides a survey of spatial problems in epidemiology with a specific focus on public health applications of spatial analysis. Topics covered will include the different types of spatial data, causal inference with spatial data, and specific examples of applications of spatial analysis to epidemiological problems.
  • Course Goals: This course is meant to introduce graduate students to the logic of spatial analysis in epidemiology and public health. By the end of the course, students will understand when spatial analysis is necessary, and common issues of causal inference with spatial data (e.g. ecological fallacies). Students will become familiar with the different ways spatial analysis is employed in different sub-fields of epidemiology and public health, ranging from chronic and infectious disease to mental and cognitive health and in the assessment of environmental exposure.
  • Competencies: 1. Apply systems thinking to a public health issue. 2. Discuss the means by which structural bias, social inequities and racism undermine health and create challenges to achieving health equity at organizational, community and societal levels.
  • Learning Objectives: 1. Describe the circumstances when spatial analysis is necessary and useful for different types of epidemiological problems and contexts. 2. Understand and describe key issues of causal inference in spatial analysis (e.g. ecological and atomistic fallacies). 3. Become familiar with statistical concepts underlying spatial epidemiological analysis.

EPID804 Race and Ethnicity in Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Needham, Belinda
  • Prerequisites: EPID 503 or EPID 600
  • Description: Considers race and ethnicity as determinants of chronic diseases and premature mortality. Theoretical as well as methodologic issues in conducting epidemiologic research on race and ethnicity are emphasized. Designed for doctoral students who have prior familiarity with the basic principles and methods of social epidemiologic research.
  • Syllabus for EPID804

EPID806 History of Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Baylin, Ana
  • Last offered Winter 2014
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: EPID601 or similar
  • Description: This is a methodology course which focuses on the historical evolution of methods (e.g., study designs) and concepts (e.g., confounding, bias, interaction and causal inference) that constitute today's epidemiology. The course will also include a brief history of Public Health and history of the Department of Epidemiology at Michigan.
  • Course Goals: 1) Practice critical thinking of epidemiologic concepts and methods in historical context 2) Understand the historical evolution of epidemiologic methods
  • Competencies: This course addresses PhD competencies #1,2,3, and 9, and Master competencies #4,5,7,9, and 10

EPID813 Advanced seminar on public health and aging

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mendes de Leon, Carlos
  • Last offered Winter 2016
  • Prerequisites: Doctoral standing at UM with training in research methods and statistics in relevant disciplines.
  • Description: This course provides advanced training in aging research pertaining to the public health and well-being of older adults. It will cover a variety of substantive and methodological areas in aging-related epidemiologic research and geriatrics. Selection of specific topics will in part depend on the interests of participating students.

EPID814 Topics in epidemiologic analysis

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Offered every year
  • Last offered Winter 2012
  • Not offered 2017-2018
  • Prerequisites: EPID601 BIOS560
  • Description: This pilot course will focus on selected theoretical and methodologic issues related to the analysis of epidemiologic data with the purpose of drawing causal inference. The topics covered will include long-standing fundamental issues as well as new techniques or novel epidemiologic applications of methods used in other disciplines. The course will consist of 14 three hour sessions. Each session will include a brief didactic presentation of the key issues for the session by the instructor followed by a structured small group and class discussion of a selected reading or readings.

EPID823 Advanced Topics in Cardiovascular Disease

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Lisabeth, Lynda
  • Prerequisites: EPID 601, BIOSTAT 523, BIOSTAT 560 or permission from instructor
  • Description: This course is for doctoral students with an interest in cardiovascular disease epidemiology (with a focus on stroke) and the epidemiologic methods used in this research area. Students will be exposed to major topics and issues in cardiovascular research and will gain experience with critical evaluation of the epidemiologic literature.
  • Course Goals: The goal of this course is to provide interested doctoral students with an opportunity to learn about cardiovascular epidemiology while providing them with an opportunity to apply their methodological training to critical evaluation of research in this area. Students taking this class are expected to learn about: 1) Pathophysiology of major forms of cardiovascular disease. 2) Methods for quantifying cardiovascular disease burden overall and in special populations. 3) Health disparities in cardiovascular disease and approaches to understanding their causes. 4) Risk factors for cardiovascular disease. 5) Translation of epidemiologic research in cardiovascular disease into clinical trials. 6) Clinical trials and evidence-based medicine. 7) Epidemiologic methods used in cardiovascular research.
  • Competencies: Critically evaluate and synthesize the scientific literature and develop new hypotheses to address gaps in our knowledge; Have a mastery of epidemiology study designs and be able to select a design that is appropriate to address a specific study question; Have a thorough understanding of causal inference, sources of bias, and methods to improve the validity of epidemiologic studies; Employ state-of-the-art statistical and other quantitative methods in the analysis of epidemiologic data; Demonstrate mastery in a substantive area of population health, and in this area integrate relevant biological, behavioral, and social mechanisms that operate at multiple levels of causation; Demonstrate excellent skills in the writing of scientific papers and grant applications; Provide clear and effective oral communications of epidemiologic concepts, methods, results, and implications to scientists, students, policy makers, and the public.

EPID824 Advanced Epidemiologic Methods

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Fleischer, Nancy
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: EPID601
  • Description: Advanced epidemiologic methods, with an emphasis on causality in epidemiologic research, theoretical considerations and interpretations of findings.
  • Course Goals: By the end of the course, the student will be able to: • Identify models, tools and strategies to strengthen causal inference in epidemiologic studies • Develop appropriate study designs in light of a specific research question, resources, population, time, and other characteristics • Analyze and evaluate observational epidemiologic studies with differing designs • Recognize and remediate issues of biases and validity in epidemiologic studies • Appreciate broader statistical concerns and alternative methods for epidemiologic research
  • Competencies: -Critically evaluate and synthesize the scientific literature and develop new hypotheses to address gaps in our knowledge -Have a mastery of epidemiology study designs and be able to select a design that is appropriate to address a specific study question -Have a thorough understanding of causal inference, sources of bias, and methods to improve the validity of epidemiologic studies -Design a research project that addresses an important population health or clinical question, using appropriate epidemiologic methods under constraints confronted in practice -Employ state-of-the-art statistical and other quantitative methods in the analysis of epidemiologic data -Provide clear and effective oral communications of epidemiologic concepts, methods, results, and implications to scientists, students, policy makers, and the public

EPID889 Responsible Conduct of Research and Scholarship Seminar

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Pearce, C. Leigh; Villamor, Eduardo;
  • Last offered Fall 2016
  • Description: This seminar will cover the Responsible Conduct of Research and Scholarship (RCRS) training for all incoming EPID PhD students and other individuals who are affiliated with a training grant. The seminar will also expose students to cutting-edge epidemiologic research topics through departmental talks by experts in the field as well as provide additional professional development training. RCRS is defined by National Institutes of Health as "the practice of scientific investigation [and academia] with integrity. It involves the awareness and application of established professional norms and ethical principles in the performance of all activities related to scientific research [and academia]."

EPID890 Doctoral Seminar in Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Fleischer, Nancy
  • Description: Doctoral seminar to provide guidance to new doctoral candidates as they write their prospectus, and to provide opportunities to practice the presentation modalities of epidemiology through seminars, poster sessions, and oral presentations.

EPID891 Advanced Readings in Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Students will review assigned readings on the epidemiology or natural history of specific infections or chronic diseases or on host or environmental factors associated with disease, or on epidemiological methods and their application. May be elected more than once

EPID970 Pre-candidacy research in Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: Doctoral Student in Epidemiology Standing
  • Description: Original investigations in the various fields of Epidemiology as part of the student's preparation for their dissertation research and writing.

EPID990 Dissertation Research/Pre-Candidate

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Description: For students who have NOT reached candidacy yet.

EPID995 Dissertation Research/Candidate

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student who has been admitted to status as a candidate

PUBHLTH615 Public Health in Action: National

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor
  • Description: An intensive course to prepare students for a culminating week-long practice-based experience designed to address existing and emerging public health priorities as defined by the respective communities and their academic partners. Students will be engaged directly with communities and exposed to the contextual, cultural, political and economic factors impacting health.
  • Course Goals: Course Goal: To provide an action-based experience for public health graduate students to address 'real time' public health issues in vulnerable communities. Course Objectives: 1.Provide students with the opportunity to develop and apply theoretical and practical skills to current public health issues impacting the well being of communities. 2.Actively engage and immerse students as partners in surfacing information, data and solutions in response to the today's public health challenges. 3.Strengthen student understanding of how public health science and practice can be used to meaningfully address complex population health issues in communities. 4.Develop skills in working with and in diverse communities.
  • Competencies: SPH Cross-Cutting Competencies: -Describe the role of structural inequality in producing health disparities -Demonstrate effective written and oral skills for communicating with different audiences in the context of professional public health activities. -Demonstrate team building, negotiation and conflict management skills. -Appreciate the importance of working collaboratively with diverse communities and constituencies (e.g. researchers, practitioners, agencies and organizations). Core Competencies, Academic Public Health Linkages: 1A1. Identifies the health status of populations and their related determinants of health and illness (e.g., factors contributing to health promotion and disease prevention, the quality, availability and use of health services). 1A2. Describes the characteristics of a population-based health problem (e.g., equity, social determinants, environment) 4A2. Recognizes the role of cultural, social, and behavioral factors in the accessibility, availability, acceptability and delivery of public health services 4A2. Recognizes the role of cultural, social, and behavioral factors in the accessibility, availability, acceptability and delivery of public health services 3A2. Communicates in writing and orally, in person, and through electronic means, with linguistic and cultural proficiency 3A3. Solicits community-based input from individuals and organizations 2A4. Gathers information that will inform policy decisions (e.g., health, fiscal, administrative, legal, ethical, social, political) 3A2. Communicates in writing and orally, in person, and through electronic means, with linguistic and cultural proficiency 3A2. Communicates in writing and orally, in person, and through electronic means, with linguistic and cultural proficiency 5A1. Recognizes community linkages and relationships among multiple factors (or determinants) affecting health (e.g., The Socio-Ecological Model) 8A1. Incorporates ethical standards of practice as the basis of all interactions with organizations, communities, and individuals