Dimensionality Reduction with Structured Variables and Applications to the Microbiome

Ann Arbor MI 02-08-2018 02-08-2018

Studies of the microbiome, the complex communities of bacteria that live in and around us, present interesting statistical problems. In particular, bacteria are best understood as the result of a continuous evolutionary process and methods to analyze data from microbiome studies should use the evolutionary history. Motivated by this example, I describe adaptive gPCA, a method for dimensionality reduction that uses the evolutionary structure as a regularizer and to improve interpretability of the low-dimensional space. I also discuss how adaptive gPCA applies to general variable structures, including variables structured according to a network, as well as implications for supervised learning and structure estimation.

Light refreshments for seminar guests will be served at  3:10 p.m. in 1690

Julia Fukuyama, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Computational Biology, Stanford University

icon to add this event to your google calendarFebruary 8, 2018
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
1690 SPH I (Lane Auditorium)
1415 Washington Heights
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029

Sponsored by: Department of Biostatistics
Contact Information: Zhenke Wu (zhenkewu@umich.edu)

Studies of the microbiome, the complex communities of bacteria that live in and around us, present interesting statistical problems. In particular, bacteria are best understood as the result of a continuous evolutionary process and methods to analyze data from microbiome studies should use the evolutionary history. Motivated by this example, I describe adaptive gPCA, a method for dimensionality reduction that uses the evolutionary structure as a regularizer and to improve interpretability of the low-dimensional space. I also discuss how adaptive gPCA applies to general variable structures, including variables structured according to a network, as well as implications for supervised learning and structure estimation.

Light refreshments for seminar guests will be served at  3:10 p.m. in 1690