SPH Digest

SPH Digest

For much of the past decade, the U-M Center for Molecular and Clinical Epidemiology (MAC-EPID) has worked to build a robust infectious-disease community at U-M, in part through its semi-annual series of symposia. Held in November, the 20th MAC-EPID symposium—on "Vaccines Past, Present, and Future"—paid tribute to the late John Maassab, professor emeritus of epidemiology at U-M SPH and developer of FluMist. The 21st symposium, scheduled for the winter term of 2015, will examine nutrition and its connections to the "2nd Epidemiologic Transition," a phenomenon in which infectious disease remains prevalent while the burden of chronic disease grows. MAC-EPID symposia "are truly interdisciplinary events," says center director Betsy Foxman. "We select topics that are cross-cutting and invite speakers who address different aspects of a given topic." Last year's winter symposium drew nearly 250 participants from a range of disciplines, including engineering, medicine, and natural resources.

Home to assorted wildflowers, five Quaking Aspens, and one chokecherry, the newly dedicated Keeler Grove in the U-M Camp Davis Rocky Mountain Field Station in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, pays tribute to the late U-M SPH Professor Gerald J. Keeler, who died in 2011. Keeler, who conducted air-quality research worldwide, taught "Ecosystem Science in the Rockies" at Camp Davis. A plaque in the grove recalls him as "an enthusiastic, fun, and caring teacher of meteorology and atmospheric science," who often advised students, "Don't forget to look up." With support from the SPH Gerald J. Keeler Fund for Scholarship in Environment and Health, U-M undergraduate student Ashley Howard attended Camp Davis last summer.