Health Behavior and Health Education Fall Term Courses

HBEHED503 Introduction to Health Behavior Theory and Approaches

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Beck, Angela
  • Description: HBHE 503 provides an introduction to the psychosocial determinants of behavioral risk factors that affect health. We address these determinants within theories, models and frameworks of health-related behavior and explore the practical application of theory to public health practice. This is a hybrid course including online sessions and in-person meetings.

HBEHED530 Techniques of Survey Research

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Schulz, Amy
  • Prerequisites: Students should have completed at least one Biostatistics/Statistics course or will need permission of instructor
  • Description: Techniques of survey research are introduced including survey design, modes of data collection, sampling, questionnaire construction, maintaining data quality, pretesting techniques, ethical considerations, and management of survey study teams. This course focus on innovative data collection methods, skill-building interactive workshops and real world experiences from survey researchers in the field.

HBEHED540 Fundamentals of Reproductive Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Frank J.
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: Recommend prior human physiol course
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: The course provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of reproductive health, in the USA and internationally. The course will introduce students to historical trends in the global burden of reproductive ill-health, the social ecology of reproductive risk, clinical health practice, and current controversies in policy and practice. Through a comparative look at reproductive health needs (e.g. maternal morbidity, contraceptive use, STI care and HIV-related services), in a range of diverse social settings, we will critically examine the logic and impact of current international standards for RH policy and practice.

HBEHED550 HIV/AIDS: Perspectives on the state of affairs, science and response to a global pandemic

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Amico, K. Rivet
  • Not offered 2018-2019
  • Description: About 35 million people are currently living with HIV, with 71% living in sub-Saharan Africa. For the first time, new treatments and strategies to prevent onward transmission have brought a vision of an "AIDS free generation". The influence of research, dissemination, policy and advocacy underlie US and International HIV/AIDS Strategies, which are uniformly adopting aggressive goals for eliminating new cases of HIV in the next decade. From the "cascade of HIV care" a new road map towards prevention and treatment has emerged and the role of individual health promotion, community engagement, health systems reforms, and policy are pivotal in achieving sustainable success in ending HIV. This course provides an overview of past, current and emerging issues in HIV-prevention, HIV testing, linkage and retention in HIV care, access to HIV treatment and achieving durable viral suppression in diverse domestic and global contexts from biological, social, structural, cultural and psychological perspectives. The course structure will generally follow a strategy of presentation from experts, advocates and affected individuals, targeted readings, lecture and discussion of a specific area on the prevention or treatment cascade, followed by lectures and activities that consolidate material presented and assigned for a given area. Most weeks have a planned combination of guest experts/speakers, readings, lecture, and activities that mobilize information into knowledge, ideas and insights.

HBEHED578 Practical Projects

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Practical projects in the application of theory and principles of Health Behavior and Health Education to individual and community-based public health settings. Course requirements include an approved practical project related to Health Behavior and Health Education in consultation with a faculty advisor. THE EXPERIENCE IS REPORTED IN AN INTEGRATIVE PAPER DEMONSTRATING THE SCIENTIFIC APPLICATION OF HBHE THEORIES AND PRINCIPLES TO THE PRACTICAL PROJECT. May be elected more than once. Enrollment limited to Health Behavior and Health Education majors with at least two full terms of prior registration.

HBEHED600 Psychosocial Factors in Health-Related Behavior

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Patel, Minal
  • Offered every year
  • Description: HBHE 600 provides an overview of the psychosocial determinants of behavioral risk factors that affect health. We address these determinants within theories, models, and frameworks of health-related behavior.

HBEHED601 Foundational Skills in HBHE

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Amico, K. Rivet
  • Prerequisites: HBHE MPH Student
  • Description: This course covers foundational skills needed to successfully complete the CEPH accredited HBHE MPH program. Knowledge and support regarding program requirements for core competencies, applied learning experience(s) and integrated learning experiences are provided, and students engage in the development of their e-portfolio throughout the semester.
  • Course Goals: This course is designed to: 1. Build a cohort community for support as professionals 2. Explore diverse professional and workplace skills. 3. Create plans for completing all MPH core competency requirements. 4. Create professional e-portfolio scaffolding and outline. 5. Demonstrate the ability to use fundamental public health practice skills developed through in-class group and dyadic activities. 6. Develop internship management, search, and planning strategies.
  • Competencies: While this course is not designed to assess specific competencies, we will work towards assisting students in integrating and showcasing fundamental core competencies.
  • Learning Objectives: Learning Objectives: Through participation in this course students will 1. Create the beginning structure for a comprehensive ePortfolio 2. Develop plans for future applied learning experiences and related products. 3. Gain skills in processes involved in summer internship placements (identifying placements, applying, exploring financial assistance options). 4. Engage with classmates in team building activities.

HBEHED608 Integrative Seminar on Healthy Cities

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: This course will fulfill the "Integrative Seminar" requirement for the Healthy Cities Graduate Certificate. The course combines public health, public policy, and built environment perspectives within one classroom. Classes are organized around guest speakers from various disciplines who will discuss the significance of interdisciplinary approaches to addressing urban health issues.
  • Course Goals: The integrative seminar is designed to combine perspectives from public health, public policy, and the built environment within a single classroom. Professionals working in these three fields have different ways of understanding the world, use different terminology to describe the phenomenon of interest, use different standards of evidence, and frame the scope of the problem in different ways. Students learn about these different approaches through the required coursework. Then, in the integrative seminar, the certificate students come together as a cohort to explore these differences and build cross-disciplinary understanding. To facilitate this process, class sessions are organized around a guest speaker series. Speakers from a variety of disciplines meet with the students to discuss the benefits and challenges of using interdisciplinary collaborations to address public health in urban contexts.
  • Competencies: ·Assess population needs, assets and capacities that affect communities' health. ·Advocate for political, social or economic policies and programs that will improve health in diverse populations.
  • Learning Objectives: ·Explain effects of environmental factors on a population's health. ·Explain the social, political and economic determinants of health and how they contribute to population health and health inequities.
  • This course is cross-listed with URP 612 002 in the Urban Planning department.

HBEHED610 Issues in Public Health Ethics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Roberts, Scott
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course will address a range of issues in public health ethics. The first part of the course will provide an introduction to key ethical frameworks and concepts relevant to public health, and it will describe the overlap and distinctions between public health and medical ethics. The remainder of the course will use a case-based approach to considering ethical dilemmas in several domains, including the following: 1) resource allocation and distributive justice; 2) questions of autonomy and paternalism; 3) health promotion & disease prevention; 4) clinical care; 5) research ethics; and 6) emerging issues in public health ethics. The course will use a blend of lectures and group discussions to consider topics of interest. Students will play an active role in researching, presenting, and writing up case studies that will be used to illustrate ethical concepts and conflicts and to facilitate class discussion.
  • Syllabus for HBEHED610

HBEHED620 Behavioral Research Methods in Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Zimmerman, Marc
  • Offered every year
  • Description: Principles of design of behavioral research on public health problems and programs. Objectives, philosophy, and methods of science including causal inference, the role of hypotheses, criteria for establishing adequate hypotheses, research designs and data collection techniques. Formulation of a research problem within a program setting.

HBEHED622 Program Evaluation in Health Education

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mistry, Ritesh
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 503 or equiv. and a course dealing with health education program development
  • Description: Examination and application, through a series of exercises, of several program evaluation models relevant for health education, including the goal attainment, goal-free, systems responsive, and decision-theoretic models, with emphasis on both process and impact analysis. Design options for measuring program effect, with the associated threats and external validity, are discussed, and several basic statistical techniques are reviewed and examined in terms of their applicability to program evaluation, including sampling and sample size determination for both surveys and experiments.

HBEHED625 Research in Health Behavior

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Inst.
  • Description: Individual work on a problem in the area of health behavior relevant to program effectiveness in public health, under the tutorial guidance of an appropriate staff member. Regular conferences are arranged to discuss research designs, proposed problem solutions, methods for data collection and analysis. The investigation is reported in a paper, which may be submitted for publication. May be elected more than once.

HBEHED628 Chronic Illness Interventions: Midlife to Older Adulthood

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Ramsay, Jessica
  • Prerequisites: Graduate standing
  • Description: This course examines chronic illness among middle aged to older adults, with a focus on self-management interventions. Students explore specific diseases, interventions, and facilitators and barriers to self-management. Key Intervention activities, e.g. health education, recruitment and fidelity are incorporated. The course involves discussion, in-class activities, written assignments and oral presentations.

HBEHED634 Child Health and Development

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Miller, Alison
  • Prerequisites: N/A
  • Description: Health outcomes for many children in the United States lag behind those of other developed countries. Moreover, significant socio-economic disparities exist in child morbidity and mortality. This course takes a developmental and social-contextual perspective on child health in the US, focusing on key concepts, current issues and intervention approaches.
  • Course Goals: Course Objectives: The course will increase student knowledge regarding health concerns for children across development and enhance critical thinking skills regarding influences on child health outcomes and intervention implications at different points in development. Specifically, the course will provide: 1) a survey of health concerns relevant for children from infancy through early adolescence (e.g., autism, obesity, depression); 2) mechanisms that shape child health outcomes (e.g., child factors, parenting and family processes, community resources; broader social contexts such as poverty); and 3) intervention approaches to promote child health. Opportunities to pursue topics of particular student interest within child health (e.g., global health, mental health) will also be available through assignments.
  • Competencies: The following HBHE Competencies are a primary focus of this course: #1. Describe the role and interaction of key determinants of health status from a social-ecological perspective (e.g. individual, family, organization, community, and society). The following HBHE Competencies are a secondary focus of this course: #2. Describe and apply relevant theories, concepts, and models from social and behavior science that are used in public health research and practice to both understand and affect health status, health behavior, social change, and policy. #6. Describe and apply the knowledge and skills necessary to interact with diverse individuals and communities within and across settings with varying levels of economic resources. #9. Understand, measure, and intervene to address health inequities.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of this course students will be able to: 1. Describe common child health concerns at different points in development 2. Articulate mechanisms and contextual factors that influence child health 3. Analyze how child developmental stage can affect intervention approach and effectiveness 4. Recommend developmentally-appropriate intervention strategies

HBEHED640 Community Organization for Health Education

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Israel, Barbara
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr. and Grad Status
  • Description: Examines social and structural factors associated with health and illness; concepts and theories regarding planned change and community; and models and principles of community organization practice for health education. Several models of community organization are analyzed along the dimensions of: community diagnosis needs assessment, selection and implementation of action strategies, evaluation research, role of the professional and ethical considerations.

HBEHED644 Readings in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr.
  • Description: Review of literature on selected topics in health behavior, health education or related areas under guidance of faculty member. Critical analysis; written and oral reports. May be taken more than once for a total not to exceed 6 credit hours.

HBEHED645 Urban Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mehdipanah, Roshanak
  • Not offered 2018-2019
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course will introduce students to the foundations of how history, politics and structural determinants of health interact to crease urban health inequities in cities worldwide.
  • Course Goals: The goal of this course is to introduce students to the foundations of urban health including the various determinants and health-related factors and their interactions, that results in urban health inequities in cities worldwide.
  • Competencies: -Describe the impact of age, life course, gender, sexuality, ability, race, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, culture, and biology on health status, health behavior, and health behavior change. -Describe the role of structural and ecologic factors that influence health status, health behavior, and health behavior change. -Describe the role of policy, legal, and regulatory environments on health status, health behavior, and health behavior change. -Describe the political, environmental, economic, cultural, and psychological influences on health status, health behavior, and health behavior change within and across settings and countries with varying levels of economic resources. -Describe the social and environmental contributors to health inequities for different health problems and condition -Describe health-related inequities through qualitative and quantitative approaches.
  • Learning Objectives: -Learn the foundations of global urban health including some of the stakeholders involved in city wide decision-making. -Gain understanding on some of the concepts of urban health and determinants of health including the social and physical factors like housing, urban design, employment, transportation and so on. -Develop a research plan to study an urban health issue in a city within the US including the proposal of solutions and recommendations to address the issue. -Develop a health communication campaign to drive policy change to address a city-specific issue.

HBEHED662 Risk Communication: Theory, Techniques, and Applications in Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Zikmund-Fisher, Brian
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course will provide students with a theoretical and practical understanding of when and why people feel their health is "at risk." We focus on building students' ability to use evidence based techniques that can increase understanding and use of health data by patients, communities, the media, and policy makers.

HBEHED663 The Use of Brief Interventions to Help People Change Health Behaviors: Evidence-Based Strategies for Work in Clinical and Community Settings

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Piette, John
  • Prerequisites: N/A
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course gives students an understanding of how brief interventions are used to impact health behaviors and the approaches used to help people make and attain behavior-change goals. Students also gain skills in applying scientific evidence from randomized trials and systematic reviews in public health decision-making.
  • Course Goals: 1) Know what brief behavioral interventions are and how they are delivered to address behavioral challenges 2) Know where to look for evidence supporting the effectiveness of brief interventions 3) Be able to review, interpret, and apply evidence from randomized trials, systematic reviews, and guidelines 4) Understand what types of brief interventions have the strongest evidence and for whom they work
  • Competencies: a) Identify theories, concepts and models from a range of social and behavior science disciplines that are used in public health research and practice involving multiple levels of change (e.g., individual, family, organization, community, and society). b) Describe overlap between current models and frameworks, and their limitations c) Describe how theory is useful in understanding why individuals do or do not engage in health behaviors. d) Understand the merits of using theory to inform interventions and their evaluation in public health. e) Describe some of the benefits and challenges of using social and behavioral theories and models to inform programs and policies involving multiple levels of change (e.g. individual, family, organization, community). f)Describe key adaptations and challenges in applying theories and frameworks to conduct public health research and practice across cultures and in resource poor settings.

HBEHED668 Health Communications for Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Resnicow, Ken
  • Offered every year
  • Prerequisites: HBHE 600
  • Description: From one-on-one health counseling to broad-based social marketing campaigns, a vast body of research over the past twenty years has demonstrated that numerous dimensions of health communications, including message format, receiver characteristics, and delivery channel can affect program impact. This course will address key considerations for constructing effective health communications including the application of behavior change theories and general marketing principles. Selected prior and current health promotion campaigns will be critically reviewed and students will be asked to develop a health communication intervention or social marketing campaign. Occasional guest lecturers, actively involved in development of health communication interventions will be integrated into the syllabus.

HBEHED698 Foundational Skills in the Practice of HBHE

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s):
  • Not offered 2018-2019
  • Description: This course covers foundational skills needed to prepare students for success in future professional public health contexts, including the internship. It begins conversations around cultural humility, group norms, and reflective practice. It will also develop students' skills in designing clear communications and group facilitation.

HBEHED699 Career Development and Capstone in Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Amico, K. Rivet
  • Description: HBHE 699 is required by students enrolled in the Master's program in HBHE. Students engage in a synthesis of knowledge formation in health behavior and health education. This course supports competency assessment and professional development with a special focus on career development and job placement.

HBEHED710 Special MPH Topics in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Master's level seminar designed to provide an extensive review of a number of substantive and methods and skill areas in health behavior and health education. Readings, discussion and assignments are organized around issues of mutual interest to faculty and students. Reviews and reports on topics required in the areas selected. May be elected more than once.

HBEHED800 Seminar in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Miller, Alison
  • Offered every year
  • Description: Advanced study of principles of health behavior, educational and motivational approaches to improve health, and research and evaluative issues in health behavior and health education. Includes discussion of behavioral science and health education applications to public health, with special topics selected by students for review and discussion. Designed for doctoral students in Health Behavior and Health Education. May be elected more than once.

HBEHED823 Structural Influences on Health and Social Behavior

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Geronimus, Arline T
  • Prerequisites: permission of instructor
  • Description: This doctoral seminar will draw on the public health and biomedical literature and also on constructs and literature from sociology, psychology, history, anthropology and demography to demonstrate how multi-disiciplinary theories and findings can be integrated to suggest a social-structural context for current public health problems. This structural understanding is designed to help HBHE doctoral students to reach candidacy with the ability to recognize the social patterning of health problems, and to discuss analytically the social structural influences, opportunities, and constraints affecting individual and social behavior, and, thereby, to develop research hypotheses and interventions or policies that take these into account. The course stresses the development of critical thinking skills, helps students recognize the social patterning of health problems, the historical influences on current health inequalities, and the ways that individual health knowledge and behavior can be reflexive, socially situated, and embedded within larger social, cultural, and historical contexts. The course also considers ways that structural forces may work through material, social psychological, and ultimately biological mechanisms to exert an impact on morbidity and mortality.
  • Course Goals: The goal of this course is to (1) ensure that all HBHE doctoral students are familiar with a structural perspective on health and social behavior; (2) to provide an in-depth example of how one would complete a structural analysis of a health problem; (3) to prepare students to address questions in the HBHE prelim that will call on them to draw on understanding of structural perspectives, including enhancing their conceptual models with structural elements; and (4) to provide students an opportunity to elaborate a detailed structural perspective on a public health problem of interest to them.
  • Competencies: Students will gain competency in: (1) critiquing existing public health literature from a structural perspective; (2) drawing on interdisciplinary literature to develop conceptual models that incorporate structural dimensions; (3) developing research hypotheses to test theories informed by a structural perspective; (4) developing research designs to test such hypotheses, using mixed-methods as appropriate; (5) interpreting study findings in light of structural understandings; (6) presenting research ideas that elaborate a structural perspective; and (7) employing structural perspectives in understanding why some interventions and policies are unsuccessful either in being implemented or in ameliorating specific public heath problems, and what are likely to be more promising approaches. In addition to providing skills for students who are interested in focusing on structural analysis in their future work, the course should provide students more interested in other HBHE approaches a basic fluency in structural analysis that will enable fruitful collaborations between doctoral students emphasizing different approaches. Students will also gain experience in presenting and defending their research and ideas in a seminar setting.
  • Learning Objectives: By the end of the term, students should be able to : (1) explain what a structural perspective is and how a structural analysis differs from simply entering sociodemographic or economic variables into statistical models; (2) understand the importance of history, culture, pervasive ideology, social stratification, and institutionalization to current public health problems and proposed solutions; (3) be attuned to the social patterning of public health problems and their implications; (4) understand how structural dimensions of public health problems influence individual and social behavior;

HBEHED900 Research in Health Behavior and Health Education

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 2-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Research work undertaken by doctoral students in collaboration with faculty advisers, including participation in on-going departmental research activities. Open only to doctoral students in Health Behavior and Health Education. May be elected more than once.

HBEHED990 Dissertation/Pre-Candidate

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Half Term (IIIA or IIIB, 1-4 credits) Election for dissertation work by doctoral students in Health Behavior and Health Education who are not yet admitted to status as a candidate.

HBEHED995 Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Half Term (IIIA or IIIB, 1-4 credits) Election for dissertation work by doctoral students admitted to status as candidate.

PUBHLTH508 Social Determinants of Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Caldwell, Cleo
  • Prerequisites: SPH MPH and SPH MHSA Residential Students Only or By Instructor Permission
  • Description: This course is designed to increase students' awareness, knowledge, and understanding of issues related to behavioral, psychological, and structural factors that contribute to understanding population health and health inequities. We will discuss key roles of health professionals in ensuring equitable treatment at multiple levels of influence to enhance population health and reduce health inequities through opportunities to practice skill building using case studies, deliberative dialogues and active listening strategies. This course will have a hybrid style (online & in-class) of instruction.
  • Course Goals: This course is designed to increase students' awareness, knowledge, and understanding of issues related to behavioral, psychological, and structural factors that contribute to understanding population health and health inequities. We will discuss key roles of health professionals in ensuring equitable treatment at multiple levels of influence to enhance population health and reduce health inequities through opportunities to practice skill building using case studies, deliberative dialogues and active listening strategies.
  • Competencies: Discuss the means by which structural bias, social inequities and racism undermine health and create challenges to achieving health equity at organizational, community and societal levels. Explain the social, political and economic determinants of health and how they contribute to population health and health inequalities. Explain behavioral and psychological factors that affect a population's health.
  • Learning Objectives: This course is designed to increase students' awareness, knowledge, and understanding of issues related to behavioral, psychological, and structural factors that contribute to understanding population health and health inequities. We will discuss key roles of health professionals in ensuring equitable treatment at multiple levels of influence to enhance population health and reduce health inequities through opportunities to practice skill building using case studies, deliberative dialogues and active listening strategies.

PUBHLTH509 Introduction to Qualitative Methods

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): King, Elizabeth
  • Prerequisites: SPH MPH and SPH MHSA Residential Students Only or By Instructor Permission
  • Description: This course is designed to provide an overview of qualitative research methods as commonly used in the field of public health. Students will learn about study design, data collection, and data analysis techniques. This course will have a hybrid style (online & in-class) of instruction.
  • Course Goals: Students will learn about the role of qualitative methods and sciences in describing and assessing a population's health.
  • Competencies: • Students will be able to select qualitative data collection methods appropriate for a given public health context • Students will be able to analyze qualitative data
  • Learning Objectives: Through this course: ? Students should be able to critically read and assess public health research that incorporates qualitative methods ? Students should be able to identify opportunities for and to correctly apply qualitative methods in public health research ? Students should learn different approaches of data collection and assess their suitability for a study design ? Students should develop basic skills in qualitative data analysis

PUBHLTH510 Communication Fundamentals

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Zikmund-Fisher, Brian
  • Prerequisites: SPH MPH and SPH MHSA Residential Students Only or By Instructor Permission
  • Description: This course will cover fundamental skills in how to communicate science and health information clearly to both scientific and non-scientific audiences. This course will primarily be online with periodic in-person meetings.
  • Course Goals: - Provide foundational skills in clear scientific writing and presentation - Convince students that communications should be intentional in design, purpose-driven, and audience-specific - Demonstrate that communication design is an iterative, feedback-driven process - Introduce concept of cultural humility in the context of communications
  • Competencies: CEPH Foundational C18. Select communication strategies for different audiences and sectors CEPH Foundational C19. Communicate audience-appropriate public health content, both in writing and through oral presentation CEPH Foundational C20. Describe the importance of cultural competence in communicating public health content.
  • Learning Objectives: - Students should gain skills in message prioritization, use of clear language, and narrative structures for science communication - Students should be able to identify and provide examples of the different ways that communications can fail to achieve their objectives, especially if cultural / contextual issues are not considered. - Students should build their self-efficacy in ability to communicate public health content in written and oral forms for relevant audiences - Students should be able to analyze how different communication modalities and formats might align with different situations, audiences, and goals.