Courses Taught by Olivia Anderson

NUTR510 Nutrition in the Life Cycle

  • Graduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Olivia
  • Prerequisites: Introductory biology and introductory chemistry
  • Description: Nutrition in the Life Cycle will cover nutritional needs of individuals during critical stages of development. Students will learn about the biological basis for nutritional requirements in normal development and maintaining health in adulthood. Consequences of over- and under-nutrition and how to identify and address these issues will be discussed.
  • Course Goals: • Identify the macro- and micronutrients critical for normal human growth and development • Develop an understanding for the biological basis of nutrient requirements during pregnancy and lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and older adulthood (65+) • Recognize the health consequences of under or excess nutrient intake at critical life stages • Understand the rationale for development of dietary guidelines and major nutritional interventions • Understand how additional lifestyle factors (e.g., sleep, exercise) can affect nutrient requirements • Identify socioeconomic and cultural barriers to meeting nutrient needs • Develop an understanding of methodological aspects of the research regarding nutrition in the life cycle
  • Competencies: • Explain the importance of nutrient intake for normal human development and health maintenance throughout the life cycle • Apply biological knowledge of nutrient requirements during critical life stages to address health consequences of a nutrient imbalance • Explain the purpose of dietary guidelines in the United States • Discuss the justification for major nutritional interventions that have occurred in the United States to address health concerns due to nutritional imbalance • Evaluate lifestyle factors when considering nutritional needs of individuals across the life cycle • Demonstrate knowledge and awareness of barriers in our society that prevent individuals to meet nutritional needs • Demonstrate interpretation of methodological aspects and results of the research regarding nutrition in the life cycle
  • This course is cross-listed with PUBHLTH310.

NUTR600 Professional Development in the Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Olivia
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status, Completion of approved internship, research or practical experience
  • Description: This is a capstone course for Nutritional Sciences Master of Public Health students as they transition from a novice to an expert from the first to second year of the degree program. In this course, students will apply the knowledge learned from the curriculum and field experience to real-life applications.

NUTR630 Principles of Nutritional Science

  • Graduate level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Olivia; Bridges, Dave;
  • Description: This course presents foundational knowledge on nutritional metabolism of macronutrients. The digestion, absorption, transport, utilization and storage of macronutrients in humans are the focus. This course integrates biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrient utilization, interactions and metabolic regulation in humans.

NUTR796 Special Topics in Nutritional Sciences


NUTR803 Effective Teaching in Public Health

  • Graduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Olivia
  • Description: Students will engage in a community of graduate students to explore/prepare for a faculty career, focusing on teaching at a university-level specifically in the public health field. Students will immerse in literature, discussion, and workshops on state-of-the-art pedagogical techniques. Course tangibles include: teaching philosophy statement, course syllabus, and teaching demonstration.
  • Course Goals: 1. Reflect on your own teaching practice; 2. Engage in conversations about teaching and faculty life with faculty and peers; 3. Design a specific course under your nutrition expertise that you could teach at a university institution; 4. Apply research-based inclusive teaching strategies to your teaching-related documents - a teaching philosophy, syllabus, lecture material; 5. Understand the purpose of different types of student learning assessment and apply them to your newly designed course; 6. Identify strategies for success in higher education for your diverse student body
  • Competencies: 1. Articulate your knowledge of effective pedagogical techniques to colleagues and future employers, both in writing and in discussion 2. Exhibit your teaching values and beliefs through course documents (e.g, syllabus, assignments, etc.) 3. Demonstrate your teaching strategies, values, and beliefs through actively practicing teaching 4. Demonstrate your ability incorporate inclusivity in the classroom setting 5. Establish the ability to actively seek feedback to meet and exceed teaching expectations at an institute of higher education
  • This course is cross-listed with PUBHLTH803.

PUBHLTH310 Nutrition in the life cycle

  • Undergraduate level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Olivia
  • Description: Nutrition in the Life Cycle will cover nutritional needs of individuals during critical stages of development. Students will learn about the biological basis for nutritional requirements in normal development and maintaining health in adulthood. Consequences of over- and under-nutrition and how to identify and address these issues will be discussed.
  • Course Goals:
    1. Identify the macro- and micronutrients critical for normal human growth and development; Develop an understanding for the biological basis of nutrient requirements during pregnancy and lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and older adulthood (65+)
    2. Recognize the health consequences of under or excess nutrient intake at critical life stages
    3. Understand the rationale for development of dietary guidelines and major nutritional interventions
    4. Understand how additional lifestyle factors (e.g., sleep, exercise) can affect nutrient requirements
    5. Identify socioeconomic and cultural barriers to meeting nutrient needs
  • Competencies:
    1. Explain the importance of nutrient intake for normal human development and health maintenance throughout the life cycle
    2. Apply biological knowledge of nutrient requirements during critical life stages to address health consequences of a nutrient imbalance
    3. Explain the purpose of dietary guidelines in the United States
    4. Discuss the justification for major nutritional interventions that have occurred in the United States to address health concerns due to nutritional imbalance
    5. Evaluate lifestyle factors when considering nutritional needs of individuals across the life cycle
    6. Demonstrate knowledge and awareness of barriers in our society that prevent individuals to meet nutritional needs
  • This course is cross-listed with A NUTR 500-level course.
  • Syllabus for PUBHLTH310