Health Management & Policy News

  • University of Michigan Tops Research Universities for FulbrightsUniversity of Michigan Tops Research Universities for Fulbrights

    University of Michigan faculty scholars received 12 Fulbright grants for the 2017-18 academic year, including three from the School of Public Health--the most of any research university in the nation. The grants fund the scholars' research or teaching overseas for six to 12 months.

    Fri, 23 Feb 2018 15:42:23 -0500

  • Listen: Holly Jarmin Talks with BBC Radio about the Health Implications of BrexitListen: Holly Jarmin Talks with BBC Radio about the Health Implications of Brexit

    Brexit will mark a major change in how medicines and medical research is regulated in the UK. That could affect everything from the supply of medicine to what kind of research is done. BBC Radio and Holly Jarmin explore the anxieties and opportunities created by this change.

    Thu, 22 Feb 2018 16:23:47 -0500

  • Medicare Patients Nationwide Will Have Chance to Try Michigan Public Health-developed Insurance IdeaMedicare Patients Nationwide Will Have Chance to Try Michigan Public Health-developed Insurance Idea

    A health insurance concept that grew from University of Michigan research may soon reach millions of people covered by Medicare, allowing them to keep more dollars in their wallets while getting treated for chronic diseases such as diabetes, depression and heart failure.

    Thu, 22 Feb 2018 16:12:04 -0500

  • HMP Student Kristen Lunde Named 2018-2019 David A. Winston Health Policy FellowHMP Student Kristen Lunde Named 2018-2019 David A. Winston Health Policy Fellow

    Kristen Lunde, 2018 Master of Public Health candidate, has been named one of two 2018-2019 David A. Winston Health Policy Fellows.

    Thu, 15 Feb 2018 14:58:45 -0500

  • Julia Wolfson Among Interprofessional Exchange Health Care Implementation Grant TeamJulia Wolfson Among Interprofessional Exchange Health Care Implementation Grant Team

    The University of Michigan health science deans have selected a faculty team to be awarded the first-ever Early Implementation Grant for the university's Interprofessional Exchange Research Stimulus program. Julia Wolfson, assistant professor of health management and policy, is on the team of investigators looking at different diet and lifestyle interventions for people with obesity, hypertension and type 2 diabetes.

    Thu, 15 Feb 2018 12:53:23 -0500

  • Chronic Disease Management Act of 2018 Introduced in CongressChronic Disease Management Act of 2018 Introduced in Congress

    On Thursday, February 8th, 2018, Senators John Thune (R-SD) and Tom Carper (D-DE), and Representatives Diane Black (R-TN) and Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), introduced the Chronic Disease Management Act of 2018 in the House of Representatives and the Senate. This bill allows for the development and implementation of High-Value Health Plans.

    Fri, 09 Feb 2018 11:46:40 -0500

  • Melissa Creary Receives Grant from Institute for Research on Women and GenderMelissa Creary Receives Grant from Institute for Research on Women and Gender

    Melissa Creary, assistant professor of health management and policy, was among eight researchers to receive seed grants from the University of Michigan's Institute for Research on Women and Gender. The grants support projects on women, gender and sexuality.

    Mon, 29 Jan 2018 16:58:13 -0500

  • Community Benefit Spending By Tax-Exempt Hospitals Changed Little After ACACommunity Benefit Spending By Tax-Exempt Hospitals Changed Little After ACA

    Simone Rauscher Singh, assistant professor of health management and policy, coauthored a paper for Health Affairs that found that, four years after the enactment of the ACA, which encouraged tax-exempt hospitals to invest in community health benefits, hospitals had increased their average spending for all community benefits by just 0.5 percentage point.

    Mon, 29 Jan 2018 16:32:01 -0500

  • Four Michigan Public Health Faculty Named Professors of Global Public HealthFour Michigan Public Health Faculty Named Professors of Global Public Health

    In January, the University of Michigan School of Public Health welcomed its second cohort of University of Michigan Professors of Global Health. The professorships, approved by the Board of Regents and effective January 1, and are held for three years.

    Mon, 29 Jan 2018 16:00:00 -0500

  • The Public Health Consequences of E-cigarettesThe Public Health Consequences of E-cigarettes

    The long-term health effects of e-cigarettes are not yet clear, but research on short-term effects is available now. A group of experts from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, including David Mendez, associate professor of health management and policy at Michigan Public Health, issued a new report with the latest scientific evidence.

    Wed, 24 Jan 2018 10:50:16 -0500

  • Anti-Smoking Plan May Kill Cigarettes--And Save Big TobaccoAnti-Smoking Plan May Kill Cigarettes--And Save Big Tobacco

    A proposal from the FDA could open the door for companies to sell a new generation of alternative tobacco products, allowing the industry to survive -- even thrive -- for generations to come. Professor emeritus Kenneth Warner shares his thoughts.

    Fri, 19 Jan 2018 13:29:36 -0500

  • Video: Precision Co-Pay Assistance ProgramsVideo: Precision Co-Pay Assistance Programs

    To address the high out-of-pocket medication costs, patient assistance programs, such as co-pay cards, have become available to reduce consumers' financial liability. However, the use of co-pay assistance for medications for which there is an effective, lower-cost alternative is financially burdensome to the healthcare system. This video introduces a clinically nuanced solution designed to ensure access to clinically indicated therapies.

    Wed, 17 Jan 2018 17:08:16 -0500

  • Will This Smart Gun Solve America's Gun Problem?Will This Smart Gun Solve America's Gun Problem?

    Could smart guns solve America's gun problem? Professor Julia Wolfson weighs in on the data for the Daily Beast.

    Mon, 08 Jan 2018 17:05:23 -0500

  • HSOP Doctoral Candidate, Adam Markovitz, Professors John Ayanian and Andrew Ryan, and others on the Incremental effects of antihypertensive drugsHSOP Doctoral Candidate, Adam Markovitz, Professors John Ayanian and Andrew Ryan, and others on the Incremental effects of antihypertensive drugs

    "Our results challenge the view that adding antihypertensive drugs will result in progressively diminishing effects on blood pressure and cardiovascular events. Our findings provide patients and clinicians with more rigorous nuanced insight into optimal management of hypertension..."

    Tue, 02 Jan 2018 14:50:39 -0500

  • Going After Opioid Manufacturers, Distributors in Court May Help with CrisisGoing After Opioid Manufacturers, Distributors in Court May Help with Crisis

    As the health care community moves on multiple fronts to address the opioid crisis, one area that holds promise is in litigation against those who manufacture and distribute prescription opioid drugs, according to Rebecca Haffajee, assistant professor of health management and policy at the University of Michigan School of Public Health.

    Thu, 14 Dec 2017 16:54:26 -0500

  • Going after opioid manufacturers & distributors in court may help with crisisGoing after opioid manufacturers & distributors in court may help with crisis

    As the health care community moves on multiple fronts to address the opioid crisis, one area that holds promise is in litigation against those who manufacture and distribute prescription opioid drugs. In a new article published in the current issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, Rebecca Haffajee, Ph.D., of the U-M School of Public Health, along with Michelle Mello of Stanford University, analyzed the history of litigation efforts to hold those parties accountable.

    Thu, 14 Dec 2017 09:49:53 -0500

  • Study Shows Most Medicaid Enrollees Already Work or Can't WorkStudy Shows Most Medicaid Enrollees Already Work or Can't Work

    Work requirements proposed in some states would probably apply to only a small group of Medicaid enrollees and may disrupt care for the chronically ill, according to new research from the University of Michigan Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation.

    Tue, 12 Dec 2017 10:24:31 -0500

  • Observation Care May Save More Than ThoughtObservation Care May Save More Than Thought

    In the world of health care spending policy, it usually works that as Medicare goes so goes private insurance on matters of managing the cost and quality of care. But new research from the University of Michigan suggests that, when it comes to the growth in use of observation care, concerns about high out-of-pocket spending are unfounded for those with private coverage.

    Fri, 08 Dec 2017 15:11:54 -0500

  • Churning, Confusion And Disruption -- The Dark Side Of Marketplace CoverageChurning, Confusion And Disruption -- The Dark Side Of Marketplace Coverage

    "There's quite a number of people who are either temporarily uninsured or they move into different plans" each year. And I'm guessing this year that will be much greater, given all the changes that are happening in the marketplace plans," said Marianne Udow-Phillips, director of the Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation and Lecturer in Health Management and Policy, on consumers switching health coverage during open enrollment.

    Fri, 08 Dec 2017 08:47:11 -0500

  • 6 signs that your job is taking a toll on your mental health6 signs that your job is taking a toll on your mental health

    Employees who do not have job security are significantly more likely to meet the criteria for depression than employees who feel secure in their careers, according to research by Sarah Burgard, associate professor of sociology, epidemiology and population studies, and Lucie Kalousova, doctoral student in health management and policy and sociology.

    Fri, 08 Dec 2017 08:42:05 -0500

  • Health Policy: Solutions for Reducing Gun Violence in the United StatesHealth Policy: Solutions for Reducing Gun Violence in the United States

    University of Michigan experts served on the Health Policy Student Association Panel (HPSA) Panel "Health Policy: Solutions for Reducing Gun Violence in the United States" on November 29, 2017.

    Tue, 05 Dec 2017 12:59:05 -0500

  • In Ads, Tobacco Companies Admit They Made Cigarettes More AddictiveIn Ads, Tobacco Companies Admit They Made Cigarettes More Addictive

    If you read a newspaper yesterday, you might have seen a full-page ad warning of the dangers of smoking--black text on an otherwise blank page telling people smoking kills about 1,200 Americans every day. You'll be seeing and hearing more of them, too. The ads were court ordered more than a decade ago. Kenneth Warner, emeritus professor of health management and policy, talks to NPR about the campaign.

    Wed, 29 Nov 2017 14:37:56 -0500

  • Consumer Engagement in Healthcare Decisions in High Deductible Health PlansConsumer Engagement in Healthcare Decisions in High Deductible Health Plans

    HSOP student Betsy Cliff, Mark Fendrick and several others from UM just published on Consumer Behaviors Among Individuals Enrolled in High-Deductible Health Plans in the United States.

    Wed, 29 Nov 2017 10:49:21 -0500

  • University of Michigan Teach-Out to Focus on Opioid EpidemicUniversity of Michigan Teach-Out to Focus on Opioid Epidemic

    The University of Michigan's Office of Academic Innovation, in collaboration with the Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation, hopes to answer questions surrounding the opioid crisis through a teach-out on the crisis. Faculty experts from across the university will share their research and expertise on opioids, and put the epidemic into perspective.

    Tue, 28 Nov 2017 10:02:48 -0500

  • ACA Program to Reduce Hospital Readmissions Not All It's Cracked Up To BeACA Program to Reduce Hospital Readmissions Not All It's Cracked Up To Be

    A federal program that has been shown to reduce hospital readmissions may not have been as successful as it appears, University of Michigan researchers report in the latest issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine.

    Mon, 13 Nov 2017 16:49:45 -0500

  • Star Wars Science with Flintstones Delivery: Why Precision Benefit Design Is Critical to Precision HealthStar Wars Science with Flintstones Delivery: Why Precision Benefit Design Is Critical to Precision Health

    "Genetic testing and precision treatments are very expensive," says Mark Fendrick, professor of internal medicine and health management and policy at the University of Michigan. "We need to ensure we're providing these tests and treatments to the right people at the right time. The only way we're going to be able to cover those costs is to stop paying for low-value services that people don't need--and that are sometimes even harmful. This is how we can create headway for innovation and pay for things that we know are valuable but that are also very expensive."

    Wed, 08 Nov 2017 15:10:11 -0500

  • Tackling the opioid epidemic: Using alternative therapies and new technologies to curb a national crisisTackling the opioid epidemic: Using alternative therapies and new technologies to curb a national crisis

    Researchers at the University of Michigan School of Public Health are working to better understand various aspects of the opioid epidemic. Among them are a chronic disease expert exploring opioid alternatives for people with chronic pain and a health policy researcher looking into how states can best monitor prescribing to curb the crisis on both a population and an individual level.

    Wed, 25 Oct 2017 12:15:50 -0400

  • The opioid crisis may be declared a national emergency, but what does that mean?The opioid crisis may be declared a national emergency, but what does that mean?

    The opioid epidemic is a critical emergency on a national scale, but does a proper solution involve a national emergency declaration from the White House similar to ones surrounding major hurricanes or virus outbreaks? Rebecca Haffajee, assistant professor of health management and policy, and other experts weigh in.

    Mon, 23 Oct 2017 17:20:03 -0400

  • Reducing salt in restaurant food: Some progress made but more neededReducing salt in restaurant food: Some progress made but more needed

    Restaurants are reducing sodium in some newer items on their menus, but when it comes to existing fare and use of sodium overall there has been little change, according to research led by Julia Wolfson, assistant professor of health management and policy and of nutritional sciences at the School of Public Health.

    Thu, 19 Oct 2017 10:41:59 -0400

  • Low-cost, high-volume services make up a big portion of unneeded health care spendingLow-cost, high-volume services make up a big portion of unneeded health care spending

    "Low-value" care, such as unnecessary lab tests, could be reduced safely to cut expenses, according to a new analysis from Mark Fendrick, professor of health management and policy and internal medicine, and colleagues at UCLA.

    Wed, 11 Oct 2017 13:08:31 -0400

  • Profs. Greer and Jarman: Brexit in any form poses major risks to NHS

    Scott Greer, professor of Health Management and Policy, and Holly Jarmin, the John G. Searle Assistant Professor of Health Management and Policy, together with colleagues in the UK authored a paper in the Lancet that argues that Brexit will damage the NHS whichever form it takes, with a 'no deal' being potentially catastrophic.

    Wed, 04 Oct 2017 13:10:53 -0400

  • College of Pharmacy and School of Public Health introduce dual degree programCollege of Pharmacy and School of Public Health introduce dual degree program

    The University of Michigan College of Pharmacy and School of Public Health have announced a new dual degree program that will provide students with a well-rounded educational foundation to prepare them for managerial careers within both pharmaceutical companies and health care provider organizations.

    Thu, 28 Sep 2017 15:40:00 -0400

  • Interactive web tool shows potential impact of tobacco policiesInteractive web tool shows potential impact of tobacco policies

    University of Michigan researchers and the Cancer Intervention and Surveillance Modeling Network (CISNET) lung consortium have created an interactive Tobacco Control Policy tool geared toward decision-makers and public health professionals.

    Wed, 27 Sep 2017 08:43:16 -0400

  • Rich American seniors are getting healthier, leaving the poor behindRich American seniors are getting healthier, leaving the poor behind

    According to new research from University of Michigan professors Matthew Davis and Kenneth Langa, while Americans on the whole are living longer, the health divide is widening across socioeconomic groups. Their work reveals a health disparity echoed in reports by others. In 1980, a wealthy 50-year-old man could expect to live an additional 5.1 years longer than a poor man of the same age. Thirty years later, the life expectancy of two similar men differs by more than a dozen years.

    Mon, 25 Sep 2017 14:10:48 -0400

  • Rich American seniors are getting healthier, leaving the poor behindRich American seniors are getting healthier, leaving the poor behind

    The growing divide in health suggests that there are at least two different Americas. Depending on where an individual sits on the socioeconomic spectrum, he might expect a different length and quality of life.

    Thu, 21 Sep 2017 09:44:00 -0500

  • Do Safety Culture Scores in Nursing Homes Depend on Job Role and Ownership? Results from a National SurveyDo Safety Culture Scores in Nursing Homes Depend on Job Role and Ownership? Results from a National Survey

    Jane Banaszak-Holl and colleagues surveyed nursing home staff (14,177 employees) from 170 of 210 invited facilities using the Nursing Home Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Survey results were merged with data on facility characteristics derived from the Certification and Survey Provider Enhanced Reporting.

    Thu, 21 Sep 2017 09:37:07 -0400

  • The future of long-term care: A public policy assessment of funding and organizationThe future of long-term care: A public policy assessment of funding and organization

    Long-term care services are at the forefront of a new wave of reforms extending public intervention into health care, but it is unclear how the government should intervene to fund and organize such services. This column, co-authored by Edward Norton, professor of Health Management & Policy at the School of Public Health, suggests some strengths and weaknesses of public financing and organization of long-term care.

    Mon, 18 Sep 2017 11:19:19 -0400

  • Legalizing marijuana should not include smoked form, say public health expertsLegalizing marijuana should not include smoked form, say public health experts

    As several states continue the debate over legalizing marijuana for recreational use, three University of Michigan researchers urge policymakers to take lessons learned from the dangers of cigarette smoking into account and consider legalizing only noncombustible forms of the drug.

    Fri, 08 Sep 2017 15:44:00 -0500

  • Warner: FDA's innovative plan to address the enormous toll of smokingWarner: FDA's innovative plan to address the enormous toll of smoking

    On July 28, 2017, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD, announced a comprehensive regulatory plan to expedite reducing the toll of more than 480,000 annual tobacco-related deaths in the United States. The plan is predicated on recognition that "nicotine--while highly addictive--is delivered through products that represent a continuum of risk and is most harmful when delivered through smoke particles in combustible cigarettes." Prof. Ken Warner discusses the implications of this.

    Fri, 08 Sep 2017 14:51:04 -0400

  • Three Michigan Public Health researchers receive Fulbright awardsThree Michigan Public Health researchers receive Fulbright awards

    Two School of Public Health faculty and one post-doctoral researcher have received Fulbright U.S. Scholar Awards that will take them overseas to do research during the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Thu, 07 Sep 2017 15:27:11 -0400

  • Congrats to the winners of the 2017 Alumni Survey Drawing!Congrats to the winners of the 2017 Alumni Survey Drawing!

    HMP conducted an Alumni Survey this past summer. Almost 1000 alums responded and provided very meaningful feedback. Congratulations to...

    Tue, 22 Aug 2017 12:11:52 -0400

  • How much would you pay to live pain-free?How much would you pay to live pain-free?

    What's the dollar value of pain? Or more accurately: What's the value of getting rid of it or avoiding it completely? Together with researchers from the University of Iceland, health management and policy professor Edward Norton tries to answer these questions.

    Thu, 10 Aug 2017 10:35:24 -0400

  • How much is living a pain-free life worth? Economists say up to $145 per day.How much is living a pain-free life worth? Economists say up to $145 per day.

    New research by economists in the United States and Iceland has put a price tag on what it's worth to Americans to live without chronic pain. Professor Edward Norton's research is examined in this article.

    Thu, 10 Aug 2017 08:17:17 -0400

  • Markel on NPR: How the 'battling' Kellogg brothers revolutionized American breakfastMarkel on NPR: How the 'battling' Kellogg brothers revolutionized American breakfast

    Dr. John Harvey Kellogg had first conceived of a healthy, plant-based breakfast in his capacity as the director of the Seventh-day Adventist sanitarium in Battle Creek, MI. His younger brother, Will, was the business innovator, who figured out how to market John's creation. Medical historian and professor of health management and policy Howard Markel describes the mass production of Kellogg's Corn Flakes in 1906 as an event that took the world by storm.

    Wed, 09 Aug 2017 10:30:58 -0400

  • Prescription Tracking Tackles Misuse of Opioids and Other Drugs -- But Results VaryPrescription Tracking Tackles Misuse of Opioids and Other Drugs -- But Results Vary

    Prescription drug monitoring programs could help fight a national epidemic and boost the effort to get people treatment, research shows. But states differ widely in implementation

    Tue, 08 Aug 2017 15:14:00 -0400

  • Program that paid hospitals to adopt electronic records delivers dramatic resultsProgram that paid hospitals to adopt electronic records delivers dramatic results

    Incentives paid to hospitals to implement electronic health records appear to have paid off, with adoption rates 8 percentage points higher per year over five years for those that were eligible for the payments compared with those that were not, according to new research led by Julia Adler-Milstein, associate professor of information and health management and policy.

    Tue, 08 Aug 2017 10:48:21 -0400

  • Haffajee: Fight The Urge To Criminalize Opioid Addiction BehaviorsHaffajee: Fight The Urge To Criminalize Opioid Addiction Behaviors

    Rebecca Haffajee, assistant professor of health management and policy, discusses a judge's policy to restrict the reproductive rights of criminal justice-involved individuals with opioid use disorders.

    Mon, 07 Aug 2017 06:54:22 -0400

  • Haffajee: What would happen if Trump declared the opioid epidemic a national emergency?Haffajee: What would happen if Trump declared the opioid epidemic a national emergency?

    Rebecca Haffajee, assistant professor of health management and policy, talks to the Pacific Standard about what a declared national emergency might accomplish.

    Fri, 04 Aug 2017 10:25:33 -0400

  • Greer: World's response to Trump's 'Global Gag Rule'Greer: World's response to Trump's 'Global Gag Rule'

    Scott Greer, professor of health management and policy at the School of Public Health, and Sarah Rominski, research assistant professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Michigan Medical School, discuss the effects of the 'Global Gag Rule' policy and how the world has responded.

    Tue, 01 Aug 2017 16:41:16 -0400

  • Professor Ken Warner's reaction to FDA plan to reduce tobacco-related diseaseProfessor Ken Warner's reaction to FDA plan to reduce tobacco-related disease

    Mon, 31 Jul 2017 10:27:01 -0400

  • More e-cigarettes, fewer tobacco smokers?More e-cigarettes, fewer tobacco smokers?

    More Americans are giving up cigarettes, and a new study suggests electronic cigarettes may be the reason why. After stalling for 15 years, the U.S. quit-smoking rate rose to nearly 6 percent in 2014-2015, up from less than 5 percent in prior years, according to national survey data.

    Thu, 27 Jul 2017 10:31:13 -0400

  • How Obamacare saved Detroit

    The city's uninsured rate has fallen from 22 percent to 7.4 over the past three years. University of Michigan experts John Ayanian and Marianne Udow-Phillips and others explain.

    Wed, 26 Jul 2017 12:34:44 -0400

  • Few student-athletes with mental illness seek helpFew student-athletes with mental illness seek help

    According research led by Daniel Eisenberg, an professor of Health Management and Policy, 33% of all college students experience significant symptoms of depression, anxiety or other mental health conditions. Among that group, 30% seek help. But of college athletes with mental health conditions, only 10% do.

    Mon, 24 Jul 2017 17:20:57 -0400

  • Prescription tracking tackles misuse of opioids and other drugs, but results varyPrescription tracking tackles misuse of opioids and other drugs, but results vary

    Prescription drug monitoring programs could help fight a national epidemic and boost the effort to get people treatment, research shows. But states differ widely in implementation.

    Mon, 24 Jul 2017 17:14:17 -0400

  • Aging Americans enjoy longer life, better health when avoiding 3 risky behaviorsAging Americans enjoy longer life, better health when avoiding 3 risky behaviors

    Research from the School of Public Health shows that people of fairly normal weight who never smoked and drank only in moderation have a life expectancy at age 50 that is seven years longer than the average American. They also are able to delay disability up to six years.

    Wed, 19 Jul 2017 16:43:15 -0400

  • Fendrick on ABC 7: Money-back guarantees on medicationFendrick on ABC 7: Money-back guarantees on medication

    Some prescription drugs now promise to perform or the manufacturer or pharmacy benefit company will provide a discount or refund. But, in most cases, the refunds don't go directly to patients.

    Wed, 19 Jul 2017 13:33:15 -0400

  • Trying to keep brain sharp doesn't have to be costlyTrying to keep brain sharp doesn't have to be costly

    While there's nothing you can do or take to ensure you won't get Alzheimer's disease, experts say there are some strategies that might help keep your brain sharp. And you don't need to dole out a lot of money to do it. Kenneth Langa, professor of Health Management & Policy, Internal Medicine and Gerontology, offers his recommendations for staying sharp at you age.

    Thu, 13 Jul 2017 12:18:47 -0400

  • Health plans that nudge patients to do the right thingHealth plans that nudge patients to do the right thing

    Mark Fendrick, professor of Health Management & Policy and Internal Medicine, talks to the New York Times about Value-Based Insurance Design.

    Mon, 10 Jul 2017 10:40:12 -0400

  • Hirth on Michigan Radio: Why ACA insurance rates will go up againHirth on Michigan Radio: Why ACA insurance rates will go up again

    Health insurance costs are going up next year. Richard Hirth, chair of Health Management and Policy, explains why.

    Tue, 20 Jun 2017 15:42:39 -0400

  • Hospital value-based purchasing program falls short of goalsHospital value-based purchasing program falls short of goals

    After four years, a program designed to reward hospitals when they deliver high quality care has failed to show an impact on clinical process and patient experience measures, and mortality outcomes following hospitalization, according to a study led by Andrew Ryan, associate professor of Health Management and Policy at the School of Public Health.

    Fri, 16 Jun 2017 15:24:47 -0400

  • Jacobson receives Distinguished Health Law Teacher AwardJacobson receives Distinguished Health Law Teacher Award

    Peter Jacobson, professor of health law and policy, was awarded the prestigious 2017 Jay Healey Distinguished Health Law Teacher Award from the American Society of Law, Medicine and Ethics in honor of his continued excellence as a health law scholar and educator.

    Fri, 16 Jun 2017 15:16:11 -0400

  • HMP faculty recognized by AcademyHealth at 2017 annual research meeting

    Three HMP faculty members were recognized by AcademyHealth at the 2017 annual research meeting.

    Wed, 14 Jun 2017 16:48:02 -0400

  • Make Medicare Advantage more flexible to allow value-based care, Fendrick tells Congressional panelMake Medicare Advantage more flexible to allow value-based care, Fendrick tells Congressional panel

    More than 19 million Americans receive their health insurance through Medicare Advantage plans offered by private insurance companies - a program aimed at increasing choice and flexibility. But those plans don't have enough flexibility to customize a key factor for the people they serve: how much they have to pay out of their own pockets when they see a doctor, fill a prescription or have a procedure. And that gets in the way of truly getting the most value out of the federal Medicare dollars that pay for their care.

    Wed, 07 Jun 2017 15:03:36 -0400

  • Prof. Greer: Populist radical right a threat to core values of medicine and public healthProf. Greer: Populist radical right a threat to core values of medicine and public health

    The populist radical right is a threat to core values of medicine and public health, even within a functioning democratic system, according to an expert commentary from Scott Greer, associate professor of Health Management & Policy.

    Mon, 05 Jun 2017 11:23:29 -0400

  • Health Insurance Benefits Should Be Equitable, Not Necessarily Equal

    As policy makers grapple with potentially undoing or modifying the largest expansion of health insurance in a generation, the cost and generosity of benefits hold center stage. Traditional underpinnings of insurance plans--premiums, deductibles, copayments, and coinsurance--frequently create barriers to the optimal use of these plans by consumers. They also can exacerbate inequities in health care, by inhibiting the use of services known to benefit health. Novel approaches to insurance plan design to produce a more equitable and efficient distribution of health care expenditures are warranted.

    Wed, 24 May 2017 17:25:08 -0400

  • Public invited to learn more about future of Obamacare through free, online U-M teach-outPublic invited to learn more about future of Obamacare through free, online U-M teach-out

    As Republicans struggle to get the votes on a second health care bill in the House, faculty at the School of Public Health invite the public to participate in an online learning opportunity focused on what's at stake. Rich Hirth, chair of the Department of Health Management and Policy, and colleagues will conduct a May 12 teach-out, "The Future of Obamacare: Repeal, Repair, or Replace?"

    Wed, 03 May 2017 15:45:23 -0400

  • Public, including gun owners, oppose allowing guns in most venuesPublic, including gun owners, oppose allowing guns in most venues

    As lawmakers across the country debate and enact legislation allowing people to carry guns in more public places, University of Michigan research shows that even those who own guns favor placing restrictions on the places firearms are allowed.

    Fri, 21 Apr 2017 10:54:55 -0400

  • Boulton recognized by the Association for Prevention Teaching and ResearchBoulton recognized by the Association for Prevention Teaching and Research

    Matthew L. Boulton, professor of Epidemiology, Global Public Health and Health Management & Policy, received the Association for Prevention Teaching and Research's (APTR) Special Recognition Award at the organization's annual meeting on April 6.

    Wed, 12 Apr 2017 14:44:02 -0400

  • Voluntary value-based health programs dramatically reduce hospital readmissionsVoluntary value-based health programs dramatically reduce hospital readmissions

    When it comes to programs that improve quality and cost in hospitals new research from the University of Michigan finds a carrot is indeed better than a stick.

    Tue, 11 Apr 2017 15:53:33 -0400

  • Affordable Care Act: U-M public health panel will discussAffordable Care Act: U-M public health panel will discuss

    In honor of the University of Michigan School of Public Health's 75th anniversary, the Department of Health Management and Policy will host a panel of experts who will discuss the many facets of the Affordable Care Act and how different options for its future could impact the U.S. health care landscape.

    Fri, 07 Apr 2017 11:03:44 -0400

  • Attention to common risk factors can impact disability ratesAttention to common risk factors can impact disability rates

    Reducing or eliminating five common risk factors could decrease the prevalence of disability across the United States, according to research led by Neil Mehta, assistant professor of health management and policy at the School of Public Health.

    Thu, 06 Apr 2017 08:23:20 -0400

  • Detroit Free Press: Faculty weigh in on how to protect Michigan's insurance market

    Marianne Udow-Phillips, Thomas Buchmueller and Helen Levy discuss how, in many ways, Michigan exemplifies how the Affordable Care Act should work.

    Mon, 03 Apr 2017 16:57:20 -0400

  • HMP Celebrates UM-SPH's 75th Anniversary in April 2017!HMP Celebrates UM-SPH's 75th Anniversary in April 2017!

    All are welcome to join students, faculty, staff and alumni as HMP celebrates the 75th Anniversary of U-M SPH in April.

    Mon, 03 Apr 2017 11:57:20 -0400

  • HMP Students win at the 2017 SEGH Global Health CompetitionHMP Students win at the 2017 SEGH Global Health Competition

    Matthew Canter, Alfred Li, and Thomas Yaros (Team Orion) came in first place at the Second Annual Global Health Case Competition. They also went on to represent the University of Michigan and win at the 2017 Virtual Emory Global Health Case Competition as well!

    Fri, 31 Mar 2017 15:27:16 -0400

  • Markel on CNN: Failing at health care is a presidential traditionMarkel on CNN: Failing at health care is a presidential tradition

    The fact is the government's commitment to provide health care for all Americans has a long, twisted history.

    Tue, 28 Mar 2017 11:35:00 -0500

  • Adler-Milstein: EHR vendors, health systems engage in information blockingAdler-Milstein: EHR vendors, health systems engage in information blocking

    A study in The Milbank Quarterly investigated the extent to which EHR vendors and health systems interfere with the electronic exchange of patient health information.

    Mon, 27 Mar 2017 16:08:00 -0500

  • HMP Faculty and Alum Collaborate on ResearchHMP Faculty and Alum Collaborate on Research

    Andy Ryan, Associate Professor of Health Management and Policy collaborated with HMP alum, Kristin Maurer (MPH, '16) and others on two articles, which were recently accepted in JAMA Internal Medicine and the Annual Review of Public Health.

    Wed, 22 Mar 2017 09:26:00 -0500

  • In the News: Fendrick on the GOP Health Care BillIn the News: Fendrick on the GOP Health Care Bill

    Mark Fendrick, School of Public Health faculty and director of the University of Michigan's Center for Value-Based Insurance Design, is working on ways to design high-deductible plans more effectively, but said that in their current form the plans take a toll on sick people with diseases that need to be carefully managed.

    Thu, 16 Mar 2017 09:34:41 -0400

  • Audio: Ayanian on GOP health care planAudio: Ayanian on GOP health care plan

    Dr. John Ayanian joined NPR's Stateside to help explain what the future may hold if the Republicans' American Health Care Act (AHCA) is passed.

    Thu, 16 Mar 2017 09:24:35 -0400

  • E-cigarettes a gateway to smoking? Not likely, according to new published researchE-cigarettes a gateway to smoking? Not likely, according to new published research

    Are e-cigarettes a gateway product that lead more people, especially teens, to smoke regular cigarettes? No, according to public health researchers from the University at Buffalo and the University of Michigan writing in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

    Wed, 15 Mar 2017 09:22:25 -0400

  • In the News: Jacobson on Health Savings AccountsIn the News: Jacobson on Health Savings Accounts

    Now, however, HSAs are back in the spotlight as a foundation of Republican plans to "repeal and replace" the Affordable Care Act. "We should help Americans purchase their own coverage, through the use of tax credits and expanded health savings accounts," Trump said during his first Congressional address.

    Thu, 09 Mar 2017 14:47:00 -0500

  • Treating high-needs patients: Some health care practices have edgeTreating high-needs patients: Some health care practices have edge

    ANN ARBOR--Primary health care practices that treat a higher proportion of high-needs patients perform better on a range of spending and utilization measures, say researchers at the University of Michigan.

    Wed, 08 Mar 2017 09:45:47 -0500

  • Hirth: ACA in the Time of TrumpHirth: ACA in the Time of Trump

    Health Management and Policy department chair Richard Hirth of the Michigan School of Public Health was interviewed about the Affordable Care Act by the Center for American Studies, an organization based in Rome that aims to create a cultural link between Italy and the United States.

    Wed, 08 Mar 2017 08:54:54 -0500

  • New GLC Blog Series!

    Griffith Leadership Center starts new and exciting blog series with interviews of each Board member. The first series kicks off with an interview with Marianne Udow-Phillips, Executive Director for the Center for Healthcare Research & Transformation (CHRT).

    Fri, 03 Mar 2017 11:17:00 -0500

  • OpEd: Ending the Tobacco ScourgeOpEd: Ending the Tobacco Scourge

    Tobacco-related deaths are a commercially propagated epidemic. Each year, smoking kills more than six million people, a tenth of them the innocent victims of second-hand smoke. This death toll persists despite a slew of tobacco control measures adopted by many countries worldwide, such as taxation, control of sales and advertising, smoking cessation services and public education.

    Mon, 20 Feb 2017 09:08:43 -0500

  • SPH Experts Comment on GOP Rewrite of ACA

    Republican members of the U.S. House of Representatives released a proposal to rewrite the Affordable Care Act. At 19 pages, it lacks specifics. But the ones there mainly impact private coverage and Medicaid, indicating the elderly and poor could pay more.

    Fri, 17 Feb 2017 16:38:12 -0500

  • UM provost search committee offer thoughts on ideal candidate at town hallUM provost search committee offer thoughts on ideal candidate at town hall

    Abbas Alawieh, a Master of Public Health candidate and committee member, expressed a desire for the new provost to be constantly thinking about how their decisions involve students, as well as the surrounding communities impacted by the university.

    Thu, 16 Feb 2017 08:30:50 -0500

  • Women With Unilateral Breast Cancer Consider Double MastectomyWomen With Unilateral Breast Cancer Consider Double Mastectomy

    More than 40 percent of patients with early stage unilateral breast cancer considered having a contralateral prophylactic mastectomy and about one in six received it, including many women who were at low risk of developing a second breast malignancy, according to new research.

    Tue, 14 Feb 2017 09:17:00 -0500

  • Capitol hill briefing puts focus on U-M health insurance ideasCapitol hill briefing puts focus on U-M health insurance ideas

    As Congress debates the next steps in national health policy, a briefing organized by two U.S. representatives on Tuesday gave elected officials and their staff a chance to learn about an idea born at U-M that has gained bipartisan support.

    Thu, 09 Feb 2017 20:48:11 -0500

  • The heavier the person, the lower the chance of getting hospice care or dying at homeThe heavier the person, the lower the chance of getting hospice care or dying at home

    The heavier someone is, the less likely they are to have what many people might call a "good death", with hospice care and a chance to die at home, a new study finds. And that difference comes with a financial, as well as a personal, cost, the research shows.

    Thu, 09 Feb 2017 20:38:14 -0500

  • High-risk breast cancer patients fail to receive genetic testingHigh-risk breast cancer patients fail to receive genetic testing

    Of all newly diagnosed breast cancer patients, only a small percentage are at risk of developing harmful mutations that can lead to severe complications. For these patients, genetic testing is widely available. However, new research shows that few women take advantage of this tool for prevention and early detection.

    Thu, 09 Feb 2017 20:33:29 -0500

  • Unpaid bills, charity care dropped by nearly half at Michigan hospitals soon after Medicaid expanded

    For decades, hospitals across Michigan have written off the cost of hundreds of millions of dollars' worth of health care every year, after caring for people who didn't have health insurance. The cost, from unpaid bills and charity care, weighs on the finances of institutions that serve all Michiganders.

    Mon, 06 Feb 2017 16:13:33 -0500

  • SPH Research: Half of breast cancer patients experience severe side effectsSPH Research: Half of breast cancer patients experience severe side effects

    Nearly half of women treated for early stage breast cancer reported at least one side effect from their treatment that was severe or very severe, a new study finds.

    Mon, 06 Feb 2017 15:09:35 -0500

  • HMP's Greer on HMP's Greer on "The Obamacare Stand-Off"

    There's a familiar refrain accompanying the battle over health care reform: "no." During the Obama administration it was Republicans rejecting the president's plans but this time time, it's the Democrats saying "no."

    Thu, 02 Feb 2017 11:20:00 -0500

  • HMP master's student on search advisory committee for next U-M provostHMP master's student on search advisory committee for next U-M provost

    Abbas Alawieh, Master of Public Health candidate, 2017, is one of the first students to serve on a high level search committee at the University of Michigan. He is very happy to represent the student voice in the search for a new Provost.

    Mon, 30 Jan 2017 11:27:06 -0500

  • Xenophobia, racism: SPH research seeks support to study impact on college studentsXenophobia, racism: SPH research seeks support to study impact on college students

    As the nation grapples with increasing reports of hate crimes against persons of color, and incidents and rhetoric reflecting a fear of immigrants, researchers who study the mental and emotional health of young people are turning to crowdfunding to find out quickly how these events are impacting college students of color.

    Fri, 27 Jan 2017 12:42:36 -0500

  • Should Your Slightly Sick Child Stay Home? The Rules Often ConflictShould Your Slightly Sick Child Stay Home? The Rules Often Conflict

    Cold and flu season means plenty of parents are trying to figure out whether their kid is too sick to go to child care or school. It's not always an easy call.

    Fri, 20 Jan 2017 15:54:54 -0500

  • Univeristy Record: Scorecard shows public health goals could suffer under TrumpUniveristy Record: Scorecard shows public health goals could suffer under Trump

    Scott Greer discusses how public health goals may be affected by the Trump presidency.

    Fri, 20 Jan 2017 09:41:06 -0500

  • SPH Partners on New Poverty Solutions Initiative

    One project involves alerting low-income homeowners about an exemption to reduce their high property taxes. Another effort employs health care workers in neighborhoods to help residents take better care of themselves. These are among nine projects funded through new grant programs by Poverty Solutions, a new initiative launched by the University of Michigan to prevent and alleviate poverty.

    Wed, 18 Jan 2017 14:23:47 -0500

  • Post-Surgical Spending Driven by Choice, Not Intensity of Services

    SPH professors Dr. Mousumi Banerjee of the department of biostatistics, and Dr. Edward C. Norton of health management and policy, have collaborated with other UM researchers to publish an article in a recent issue of Health Affairs examining spending patterns for post-surgery patient care.

    Tue, 17 Jan 2017 13:33:55 -0500

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