Health Management & Policy at the U-M School of Public Health News & Events

News & Events

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  • Leaders in the Field: Empowering Public Health Leaders with Authentic, Challenging ExperiencesLeaders in the Field: Empowering Public Health Leaders with Authentic, Challenging Experiences

    For all the knowledge it holds, the University of Michigan doesn't build its Leaders and Best in the confines of campus and classroom alone. For its students to serve--to go forth and fulfill the responsibility and promise of that uniquely Michigan mantra--experience away from whiteboards and spreadsheets is critical to their education and to their responsibility to develop and act as agents of change.

    Wed, 30 May 2018 00:00:55 -0400

  • Curricular Innovations: Ken Warner and Public Health 200Curricular Innovations: Ken Warner and Public Health 200

    Ken Warner had been saying for years that we needed an undergraduate introduction to public health here at Michigan, to meet growing student interest and to help recruit great Michigan talent into the field. Part of the rapidly expanding interest in public health is that, as Warner puts it, students are seeking "a fulfilling career, and public health speaks to that need in countless ways."

    Mon, 14 May 2018 00:00:00 -0500

  • Life Propelled: The Melva Hardy Scholarship AwardLife Propelled: The Melva Hardy Scholarship Award

    Alumna Melva Hardy's passion, love, and significant professional contributions are still making their way around the world of public health. Her untimely death in 2016 moved her family, friends, and colleagues to support others in her name. Inspired by Hardy's legacy, her classmates began connecting with each other to find ways of honoring that legacy while giving back to the school and moving it forward.

    Mon, 07 May 2018 00:00:53 -0400

  • A Critical Age: Ending Stigma and Keeping Young People Healthy in Mind and BodyA Critical Age: Ending Stigma and Keeping Young People Healthy in Mind and Body

    Every year, the field of public health sees growing interest in studying and improving mental health. Public health's focus on preventive interventions means this work can help people avoid suffering from mental illnesses well before they might take hold.

    Fri, 04 May 2018 00:01:08 -0400

  • Researchers Receive Grant from National Center for Institutional DiversityResearchers Receive Grant from National Center for Institutional Diversity

    Two School of Public Health faculty members, along with their students, have received grants from the National Center for Institutional Diversity to support their work in social change.

    Thu, 03 May 2018 11:58:42 -0400

  • Opioid Epidemic: More Funding NeededOpioid Epidemic: More Funding Needed

    More funding is needed to address the opioid epidemic that is projected to cost the US economy $200 billion by 2020, according to an article by Rebecca Haffajee, assistant professor of health management and policy.

    Fri, 27 Apr 2018 13:18:22 -0400

  • Vaping's Potential to Benefit Public Health Exceeds Its RisksVaping's Potential to Benefit Public Health Exceeds Its Risks

    The benefits of vaping to quit smoking far outweigh the health risks of youths moving from electronic to traditional cigarettes, according to a new study led by Kenneth Warner and David Mendez of the University of Michigan School of Public Health.

    Wed, 18 Apr 2018 16:02:28 -0400

  • Student Advocates Take Gun Violence Research Findings to Lansing to Influence Policy DiscussionsStudent Advocates Take Gun Violence Research Findings to Lansing to Influence Policy Discussions

    Fifteen students from the School of Public Health spent Tuesday, March 6, in Lansing meeting with lawmakers and their staff to share research findings and advocate for policy changes based on data and evidence.

    Thu, 05 Apr 2018 13:16:15 -0400

  • Q&A with Rebecca Haffajee: Holding Drugmakers Accountable for the Opioid CrisisQ&A with Rebecca Haffajee: Holding Drugmakers Accountable for the Opioid Crisis

    Hundreds of communities in the U.S. are suing the makers and distributors of opioid painkillers, arguing that the companies should help pay the enormous costs of the deadliest drug epidemic in U.S. history. Rebecca Haffajee, assistant professor of health management and policy, answers questions about past cases against opioid drugmakers and the latest lawsuits.

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 16:26:36 -0400

  • Christopher Clarke Named Among 40 Under 40 Leaders in HealthChristopher Clarke Named Among 40 Under 40 Leaders in Health

    Christopher Clarke, program director for the Summer Enrichment Program and the Collaborative, was recognized by the National Minority Quality Forum in its 2018 40 Under 40 Leaders in Health Awards.

    Thu, 22 Mar 2018 10:12:21 -0400

  • UnitedHealthcare Establishes New Endowed Professorship  at University of Michigan School of Public HealthUnitedHealthcare Establishes New Endowed Professorship at University of Michigan School of Public Health

    The University of Michigan School of Public Health announced that Andrew Ryan has been named the first UnitedHealthcare Professor of Health Care Management. UnitedHealthcare established this $2.5 million endowed professorship to support a selected tenured faculty member by funding both salary and a discretionary fund that enables the school to pursue innovative health policy research.

    Wed, 21 Mar 2018 10:00:42 -0400

  • Does a health-in-all-policies approach promote health equity?Does a health-in-all-policies approach promote health equity?

    HMP Professor emeritus Peter Jacobson describes findings on this topic from sixty-five in-depth interviews conducted in five states in 2016-17 with US officials in the public and private sectors.

    Mon, 12 Mar 2018 09:14:53 -0400

  • University of Michigan Tops Research Universities for FulbrightsUniversity of Michigan Tops Research Universities for Fulbrights

    University of Michigan faculty scholars received 12 Fulbright grants for the 2017-18 academic year, including three from the School of Public Health--the most of any research university in the nation. The grants fund the scholars' research or teaching overseas for six to 12 months.

    Fri, 23 Feb 2018 15:42:23 -0500

  • Listen: Holly Jarmin Talks with BBC Radio about the Health Implications of BrexitListen: Holly Jarmin Talks with BBC Radio about the Health Implications of Brexit

    Brexit will mark a major change in how medicines and medical research is regulated in the UK. That could affect everything from the supply of medicine to what kind of research is done. BBC Radio and Holly Jarmin explore the anxieties and opportunities created by this change.

    Thu, 22 Feb 2018 16:23:47 -0500

  • Medicare Patients Nationwide Will Have Chance to Try Michigan Public Health-developed Insurance IdeaMedicare Patients Nationwide Will Have Chance to Try Michigan Public Health-developed Insurance Idea

    A health insurance concept that grew from University of Michigan research may soon reach millions of people covered by Medicare, allowing them to keep more dollars in their wallets while getting treated for chronic diseases such as diabetes, depression and heart failure.

    Thu, 22 Feb 2018 16:12:04 -0500

  • HMP Student Kristen Lunde Named 2018-2019 David A. Winston Health Policy FellowHMP Student Kristen Lunde Named 2018-2019 David A. Winston Health Policy Fellow

    Kristen Lunde, 2018 Master of Public Health candidate, has been named one of two 2018-2019 David A. Winston Health Policy Fellows.

    Thu, 15 Feb 2018 14:58:45 -0500

  • Julia Wolfson Among Interprofessional Exchange Health Care Implementation Grant TeamJulia Wolfson Among Interprofessional Exchange Health Care Implementation Grant Team

    The University of Michigan health science deans have selected a faculty team to be awarded the first-ever Early Implementation Grant for the university's Interprofessional Exchange Research Stimulus program. Julia Wolfson, assistant professor of health management and policy, is on the team of investigators looking at different diet and lifestyle interventions for people with obesity, hypertension and type 2 diabetes.

    Thu, 15 Feb 2018 12:53:23 -0500

  • Chronic Disease Management Act of 2018 Introduced in CongressChronic Disease Management Act of 2018 Introduced in Congress

    On Thursday, February 8th, 2018, Senators John Thune (R-SD) and Tom Carper (D-DE), and Representatives Diane Black (R-TN) and Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), introduced the Chronic Disease Management Act of 2018 in the House of Representatives and the Senate. This bill allows for the development and implementation of High-Value Health Plans.

    Fri, 09 Feb 2018 11:46:40 -0500

  • Melissa Creary Receives Grant from Institute for Research on Women and GenderMelissa Creary Receives Grant from Institute for Research on Women and Gender

    Melissa Creary, assistant professor of health management and policy, was among eight researchers to receive seed grants from the University of Michigan's Institute for Research on Women and Gender. The grants support projects on women, gender and sexuality.

    Mon, 29 Jan 2018 16:58:13 -0500

  • Community Benefit Spending By Tax-Exempt Hospitals Changed Little After ACACommunity Benefit Spending By Tax-Exempt Hospitals Changed Little After ACA

    Simone Rauscher Singh, assistant professor of health management and policy, coauthored a paper for Health Affairs that found that, four years after the enactment of the ACA, which encouraged tax-exempt hospitals to invest in community health benefits, hospitals had increased their average spending for all community benefits by just 0.5 percentage point.

    Mon, 29 Jan 2018 16:32:01 -0500

  • Four Michigan Public Health Faculty Named Professors of Global Public HealthFour Michigan Public Health Faculty Named Professors of Global Public Health

    In January, the University of Michigan School of Public Health welcomed its second cohort of University of Michigan Professors of Global Health. The professorships, approved by the Board of Regents and effective January 1, and are held for three years.

    Mon, 29 Jan 2018 16:00:00 -0500

  • The Public Health Consequences of E-cigarettesThe Public Health Consequences of E-cigarettes

    The long-term health effects of e-cigarettes are not yet clear, but research on short-term effects is available now. A group of experts from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, including David Mendez, associate professor of health management and policy at Michigan Public Health, issued a new report with the latest scientific evidence.

    Wed, 24 Jan 2018 10:50:16 -0500

  • Anti-Smoking Plan May Kill Cigarettes--And Save Big TobaccoAnti-Smoking Plan May Kill Cigarettes--And Save Big Tobacco

    A proposal from the FDA could open the door for companies to sell a new generation of alternative tobacco products, allowing the industry to survive -- even thrive -- for generations to come. Professor emeritus Kenneth Warner shares his thoughts.

    Fri, 19 Jan 2018 13:29:36 -0500

  • Video: Precision Co-Pay Assistance ProgramsVideo: Precision Co-Pay Assistance Programs

    To address the high out-of-pocket medication costs, patient assistance programs, such as co-pay cards, have become available to reduce consumers' financial liability. However, the use of co-pay assistance for medications for which there is an effective, lower-cost alternative is financially burdensome to the healthcare system. This video introduces a clinically nuanced solution designed to ensure access to clinically indicated therapies.

    Wed, 17 Jan 2018 17:08:16 -0500

  • Will This Smart Gun Solve America's Gun Problem?Will This Smart Gun Solve America's Gun Problem?

    Could smart guns solve America's gun problem? Professor Julia Wolfson weighs in on the data for the Daily Beast.

    Mon, 08 Jan 2018 17:05:23 -0500

  • HSOP Doctoral Candidate, Adam Markovitz, Professors John Ayanian and Andrew Ryan, and others on the Incremental effects of antihypertensive drugsHSOP Doctoral Candidate, Adam Markovitz, Professors John Ayanian and Andrew Ryan, and others on the Incremental effects of antihypertensive drugs

    "Our results challenge the view that adding antihypertensive drugs will result in progressively diminishing effects on blood pressure and cardiovascular events. Our findings provide patients and clinicians with more rigorous nuanced insight into optimal management of hypertension..."

    Tue, 02 Jan 2018 14:50:39 -0500

  • Going After Opioid Manufacturers, Distributors in Court May Help with CrisisGoing After Opioid Manufacturers, Distributors in Court May Help with Crisis

    As the health care community moves on multiple fronts to address the opioid crisis, one area that holds promise is in litigation against those who manufacture and distribute prescription opioid drugs, according to Rebecca Haffajee, assistant professor of health management and policy at the University of Michigan School of Public Health.

    Thu, 14 Dec 2017 16:54:26 -0500

  • Going after opioid manufacturers & distributors in court may help with crisisGoing after opioid manufacturers & distributors in court may help with crisis

    As the health care community moves on multiple fronts to address the opioid crisis, one area that holds promise is in litigation against those who manufacture and distribute prescription opioid drugs. In a new article published in the current issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, Rebecca Haffajee, Ph.D., of the U-M School of Public Health, along with Michelle Mello of Stanford University, analyzed the history of litigation efforts to hold those parties accountable.

    Thu, 14 Dec 2017 09:49:53 -0500

  • Study Shows Most Medicaid Enrollees Already Work or Can't WorkStudy Shows Most Medicaid Enrollees Already Work or Can't Work

    Work requirements proposed in some states would probably apply to only a small group of Medicaid enrollees and may disrupt care for the chronically ill, according to new research from the University of Michigan Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation.

    Tue, 12 Dec 2017 10:24:31 -0500

  • Observation Care May Save More Than ThoughtObservation Care May Save More Than Thought

    In the world of health care spending policy, it usually works that as Medicare goes so goes private insurance on matters of managing the cost and quality of care. But new research from the University of Michigan suggests that, when it comes to the growth in use of observation care, concerns about high out-of-pocket spending are unfounded for those with private coverage.

    Fri, 08 Dec 2017 15:11:54 -0500

  • Churning, Confusion And Disruption -- The Dark Side Of Marketplace CoverageChurning, Confusion And Disruption -- The Dark Side Of Marketplace Coverage

    "There's quite a number of people who are either temporarily uninsured or they move into different plans" each year. And I'm guessing this year that will be much greater, given all the changes that are happening in the marketplace plans," said Marianne Udow-Phillips, director of the Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation and Lecturer in Health Management and Policy, on consumers switching health coverage during open enrollment.

    Fri, 08 Dec 2017 08:47:11 -0500

  • 6 signs that your job is taking a toll on your mental health6 signs that your job is taking a toll on your mental health

    Employees who do not have job security are significantly more likely to meet the criteria for depression than employees who feel secure in their careers, according to research by Sarah Burgard, associate professor of sociology, epidemiology and population studies, and Lucie Kalousova, doctoral student in health management and policy and sociology.

    Fri, 08 Dec 2017 08:42:05 -0500

  • Health Policy: Solutions for Reducing Gun Violence in the United StatesHealth Policy: Solutions for Reducing Gun Violence in the United States

    University of Michigan experts served on the Health Policy Student Association Panel (HPSA) Panel "Health Policy: Solutions for Reducing Gun Violence in the United States" on November 29, 2017.

    Tue, 05 Dec 2017 12:59:05 -0500

  • In Ads, Tobacco Companies Admit They Made Cigarettes More AddictiveIn Ads, Tobacco Companies Admit They Made Cigarettes More Addictive

    If you read a newspaper yesterday, you might have seen a full-page ad warning of the dangers of smoking--black text on an otherwise blank page telling people smoking kills about 1,200 Americans every day. You'll be seeing and hearing more of them, too. The ads were court ordered more than a decade ago. Kenneth Warner, emeritus professor of health management and policy, talks to NPR about the campaign.

    Wed, 29 Nov 2017 14:37:56 -0500

  • Consumer Engagement in Healthcare Decisions in High Deductible Health PlansConsumer Engagement in Healthcare Decisions in High Deductible Health Plans

    HSOP student Betsy Cliff, Mark Fendrick and several others from UM just published on Consumer Behaviors Among Individuals Enrolled in High-Deductible Health Plans in the United States.

    Wed, 29 Nov 2017 10:49:21 -0500

  • University of Michigan Teach-Out to Focus on Opioid EpidemicUniversity of Michigan Teach-Out to Focus on Opioid Epidemic

    The University of Michigan's Office of Academic Innovation, in collaboration with the Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation, hopes to answer questions surrounding the opioid crisis through a teach-out on the crisis. Faculty experts from across the university will share their research and expertise on opioids, and put the epidemic into perspective.

    Tue, 28 Nov 2017 10:02:48 -0500

  • ACA Program to Reduce Hospital Readmissions Not All It's Cracked Up To BeACA Program to Reduce Hospital Readmissions Not All It's Cracked Up To Be

    A federal program that has been shown to reduce hospital readmissions may not have been as successful as it appears, University of Michigan researchers report in the latest issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine.

    Mon, 13 Nov 2017 16:49:45 -0500

  • Star Wars Science with Flintstones Delivery: Why Precision Benefit Design Is Critical to Precision HealthStar Wars Science with Flintstones Delivery: Why Precision Benefit Design Is Critical to Precision Health

    "Genetic testing and precision treatments are very expensive," says Mark Fendrick, professor of internal medicine and health management and policy at the University of Michigan. "We need to ensure we're providing these tests and treatments to the right people at the right time. The only way we're going to be able to cover those costs is to stop paying for low-value services that people don't need--and that are sometimes even harmful. This is how we can create headway for innovation and pay for things that we know are valuable but that are also very expensive."

    Wed, 08 Nov 2017 15:10:11 -0500

  • Tackling the opioid epidemic: Using alternative therapies and new technologies to curb a national crisisTackling the opioid epidemic: Using alternative therapies and new technologies to curb a national crisis

    Researchers at the University of Michigan School of Public Health are working to better understand various aspects of the opioid epidemic. Among them are a chronic disease expert exploring opioid alternatives for people with chronic pain and a health policy researcher looking into how states can best monitor prescribing to curb the crisis on both a population and an individual level.

    Wed, 25 Oct 2017 12:15:50 -0400

  • The opioid crisis may be declared a national emergency, but what does that mean?The opioid crisis may be declared a national emergency, but what does that mean?

    The opioid epidemic is a critical emergency on a national scale, but does a proper solution involve a national emergency declaration from the White House similar to ones surrounding major hurricanes or virus outbreaks? Rebecca Haffajee, assistant professor of health management and policy, and other experts weigh in.

    Mon, 23 Oct 2017 17:20:03 -0400

  • Reducing salt in restaurant food: Some progress made but more neededReducing salt in restaurant food: Some progress made but more needed

    Restaurants are reducing sodium in some newer items on their menus, but when it comes to existing fare and use of sodium overall there has been little change, according to research led by Julia Wolfson, assistant professor of health management and policy and of nutritional sciences at the School of Public Health.

    Thu, 19 Oct 2017 10:41:59 -0400

  • Low-cost, high-volume services make up a big portion of unneeded health care spendingLow-cost, high-volume services make up a big portion of unneeded health care spending

    "Low-value" care, such as unnecessary lab tests, could be reduced safely to cut expenses, according to a new analysis from Mark Fendrick, professor of health management and policy and internal medicine, and colleagues at UCLA.

    Wed, 11 Oct 2017 13:08:31 -0400

  • Profs. Greer and Jarman: Brexit in any form poses major risks to NHS

    Scott Greer, professor of Health Management and Policy, and Holly Jarmin, the John G. Searle Assistant Professor of Health Management and Policy, together with colleagues in the UK authored a paper in the Lancet that argues that Brexit will damage the NHS whichever form it takes, with a 'no deal' being potentially catastrophic.

    Wed, 04 Oct 2017 13:10:53 -0400

  • College of Pharmacy and School of Public Health introduce dual degree programCollege of Pharmacy and School of Public Health introduce dual degree program

    The University of Michigan College of Pharmacy and School of Public Health have announced a new dual degree program that will provide students with a well-rounded educational foundation to prepare them for managerial careers within both pharmaceutical companies and health care provider organizations.

    Thu, 28 Sep 2017 15:40:00 -0400

  • Interactive web tool shows potential impact of tobacco policiesInteractive web tool shows potential impact of tobacco policies

    University of Michigan researchers and the Cancer Intervention and Surveillance Modeling Network (CISNET) lung consortium have created an interactive Tobacco Control Policy tool geared toward decision-makers and public health professionals.

    Wed, 27 Sep 2017 08:43:16 -0400

  • Rich American seniors are getting healthier, leaving the poor behindRich American seniors are getting healthier, leaving the poor behind

    According to new research from University of Michigan professors Matthew Davis and Kenneth Langa, while Americans on the whole are living longer, the health divide is widening across socioeconomic groups. Their work reveals a health disparity echoed in reports by others. In 1980, a wealthy 50-year-old man could expect to live an additional 5.1 years longer than a poor man of the same age. Thirty years later, the life expectancy of two similar men differs by more than a dozen years.

    Mon, 25 Sep 2017 14:10:48 -0400

  • Rich American seniors are getting healthier, leaving the poor behindRich American seniors are getting healthier, leaving the poor behind

    The growing divide in health suggests that there are at least two different Americas. Depending on where an individual sits on the socioeconomic spectrum, he might expect a different length and quality of life.

    Thu, 21 Sep 2017 09:44:00 -0500

  • Do Safety Culture Scores in Nursing Homes Depend on Job Role and Ownership? Results from a National SurveyDo Safety Culture Scores in Nursing Homes Depend on Job Role and Ownership? Results from a National Survey

    Jane Banaszak-Holl and colleagues surveyed nursing home staff (14,177 employees) from 170 of 210 invited facilities using the Nursing Home Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Survey results were merged with data on facility characteristics derived from the Certification and Survey Provider Enhanced Reporting.

    Thu, 21 Sep 2017 09:37:07 -0400

  • The future of long-term care: A public policy assessment of funding and organizationThe future of long-term care: A public policy assessment of funding and organization

    Long-term care services are at the forefront of a new wave of reforms extending public intervention into health care, but it is unclear how the government should intervene to fund and organize such services. This column, co-authored by Edward Norton, professor of Health Management & Policy at the School of Public Health, suggests some strengths and weaknesses of public financing and organization of long-term care.

    Mon, 18 Sep 2017 11:19:19 -0400

  • Legalizing marijuana should not include smoked form, say public health expertsLegalizing marijuana should not include smoked form, say public health experts

    As several states continue the debate over legalizing marijuana for recreational use, three University of Michigan researchers urge policymakers to take lessons learned from the dangers of cigarette smoking into account and consider legalizing only noncombustible forms of the drug.

    Fri, 08 Sep 2017 15:44:00 -0500

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