Health Management and Policy Fall Term Courses

HMP517 Issues in Public Health Genetics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Citrin, Toby; Modell, Stephen;
  • Not offered 2018-2019
  • Prerequisites: EPID 515 or Perm Instr
  • Description: This course focuses on ethical, legal, and social issues and analysis arising from the increasing application of genetic technologies to the health of individuals and populations. The four course segments cover the technical and social background of population-based genetic interventions, decision making criteria used in assessing the feasibility of proposed genetic screening programs and gene therapy trials, policy frameworks, such as cost-effectiveness analysis and ethical reasoning, which can aid in the selection and design of genetic programs and policies, and the deliberative processes decision making bodies can use in resolving differing interests as policy is developed and adopted. Each segment involves didactic presentations and class exercises in which students will grapple with current and anticipated publicized dilemmas. The segments collectively are linked by examples common to each portion of the course.
  • Syllabus for HMP517

HMP600 The Health Services System I

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Dotson, Ebbin
  • Prerequisites: Enrollment in HMP or Perm Instr
  • Description: First part of two-course sequence focusing on major issues in the organization of a health services system: role of values; assessment of health status; analysis of need, access and use of services; current supply and distribution of health resources; analysis of health care costs and expenditures. Students enrolling in HMP 600 are expected to also complete HMP 601.
  • Syllabus for HMP600

HMP604 Organization and Management of Health Advocacy and Community-Based Non-profits

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Banaszak-Holl, Jane
  • Prerequisites: HMP Graduate Standing or PI
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course is one of two HMP courses that fulfills the organization theory/management degree requirement. These courses provide knowledge of the theories of organizations, the use of leadership, management processes, and organizational structures and outcomes. Specific topics include governance, strategic management and marketing, human resources management, and process improvement. Nonprofit advocacy and community-based organizations face unique challenges related to their mission and ownership, including a greater need to motivate employees through culture and to integrate volunteers into the workforce and to manage complex stakeholder relations within communities. All this must be done with scarce resources and frequently, small budgets and workforces. This course includes analysis of the goals, environmental conditions and organizational structures of nonprofit health organizations, including a variety of smaller (and largely, non-medical) community-based nonprofits. Examples of the best managerial practices for these types of organizations and of commonly known NGOs and other nonprofits are used throughout the course.
  • Syllabus for HMP604

HMP606 Managerial Accounting for Health Care Administrators

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Singh, Simone
  • Prerequisites: Intermediate microeconomics theory
  • Description: Concepts and techniques of managerial accounting for generalist health care administrators. Topics covered include full cost measurement, differential cost measurement and analysis, sources of revenue, price setting, budgeting and control, costs and decision-making fund accounting

HMP608 Health Care Financial Accounting

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1-2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Comstock, Matthew
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course provides an overview of financial accounting for students interested in health care management and policy. It is designed to serve the needs of both students who have never had a course in financial accounting (for 2 credits) and students who have had an introductory course in financial accounting but without health care applications (for 1 credit).

HMP610 Cost-Effectiveness Analysis in Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Hutton, David
  • Prerequisites: Perm. Instr
  • Description: HMP 610 focuses on the use of cost effectiveness analysis to inform decisions about improving health. The course also covers a number of related analytical tools such as cost benefit analysis, decision analysis, and sensitivity analysis. Students will learn theoretical justifications for these tools as well as their limitations. The main goal is for students to understand when cost effectiveness analysis and related tools are appropriate and how to apply them in practice to a broad range of health issues.
  • Syllabus for HMP610

HMP615 Introduction to Public Health Policy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Jarman, Holly
  • Offered every year
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: Describes the nature of public policy interventions within the various domains of public health, the theoretical motivations for undertaking them, the influence of the political, bureaucratic, and social environmental in which policy decisions are made, the consequences of such decisions, and the key dimensions of analysis of the effects of public health policies. In addition to conceptual discussion of each of the above, the course includes evaluation of several case studies of public health policy decisions and their implications.
  • Syllabus for HMP615

HMP620 Professional Development

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Killaly, Catherine
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course is designed for HMP students to synthesize, integrate learning and to foster professional development and lifelong learning habits.
  • Course Goals: This course will allow HMP students to synthesize, integrate learning and to foster professional development and lifelong learning habits.
  • Competencies: Domain: Leadership C.3 Accountability: Hold self and others accountable to standards of performance; encourage commitment to the long-term good of the organization. C.6 Impact and Influence: Persuade and convince others, both individuals and groups, to support a point of view, position, or recommendation. Domain: Professional Development E.1 Actively seek feedback from others, reflecting and learning from successes and failures. E.2 Develop an accurate view of own strengths and developmental needs, including the impact one has on others. E.3 Continuously push self to raise personal standards of performance and exceed expectations. E.4 Address knowledge, skills, and other developmental gaps through reflective, self-directed learning, and by trying new approaches. E.5 Establish, build, and sustain a network for professional development.
  • Syllabus for HMP620

HMP622 Qualitative Methods for Health Policy Research

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Jarman, Holly
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: During the course, students will gain experience in creating a research plan, conducting interviews, analyzing interview data, and presenting their qualitative findings to an audience.
  • Course Goals: Understand how knowledge is generated from qualitative sources in public health and health services research; Evaluate qualitative research done by others in the discipline; Identify appropriate research methods and begin to design and conduct their own qualitative research projects on a basic level; Appreciate ethical questions raised by qualitative research and address them through research design.
  • Competencies: Identify appropriate sources and gather information, effectively and efficiently. ?Appraise literature and data critically.Understand the policy-making process and the role of politics; assess a problem and identify and compare potential policy solutions; and understand and critically assess methods to evaluate policy impact.Plan, oversee, and successfully execute large-scale projects involving significant resources, scope and impact.

HMP623 Principles and Practice of Preventive Medicine

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Power, Laura
  • Not offered 2018-2019
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course is intended to introduce preventive medicine residents and graduate students to the principles of preventive medicine and public health via a seminar approach.
  • Course Goals: Goal: To introduce preventive medicine residents and public health graduate students to the principles of preventive medicine and public health via a seminar approach. Course Objectives (course competencies): 1.Individual seminars are facilitated by residency physician faculty and other invited physician faculty who provide guidance and oversight to the presenting resident for a given session. 2. Students will develop presentations that are based on peer review papers selected by the residents who also facilitate the participation of non-physicians enrolled in the course. 3.Students will present on topics including, but not limited to, emerging infectious diseases, cancer epidemiology, public health policy, preventive health services and management, immunizations, cardiovascular disease, and genomics.
  • Competencies: EPID: 2. Discuss population patterns of vital statistics, outbreaks, and health outcomes in terms of person, place and time. 8.Understand basic aspects of applied epidemiology in population, community, and/or hospital settings...and the relative use of epidemiological, clinical and laboratory information specific to each. 9.Demonstrate written and oral communication skills related to epidemiological sciences within the context of public health. HMP: 6. Understand and apply basic epidemiological principles, measures, and methods to assess the health status of a population; identify risk factors in individuals and communities; evaluate the impact of population-based interventions and initiatives. 8. Speak and write in a clear,logical;, and grammatical manner in formal and informal situations; prepare cogent business presentations; facilitate an effective group process. 10. Analyze the business, demographic, ethnocultural, political and regulatory implications of decisions and develop strategies that continually improve the long-term success and viability of the organization.
  • This course is cross-listed with EPID 650.

HMP626 Race, Ethnicity, Culture and Policy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Creary, Melissa
  • Prerequisites: Graduate Standing
  • Description: This course is writing intensive and will critically examine aspects of health and policy reform from state and federal perspective. Taught primarily from a US perspective, topics with an international lens will be covered to explore domestic policy and international implications of policies and structures.

HMP630 Business of Biology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • This course is cross-listed with BA 518 in the Business Administration department.

HMP633 Health Insurance in America. How Did We Get Into This Mess? How Do We Get Out?

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Udow-Phillips, Marianne
  • Not offered 2018-2019
  • Prerequisites: HMP 600
  • Description: This course explores the history, structure and likely future trends of health insurance in the U.S. The course includes policy analyses of health insurance related issues focusing on potential solution alternatives to political and practical problems. It provides in depth overview of basic features of private and public health insurance.
  • Course Goals: The major objective of the course is to provide the student with a comprehensive understanding of how the United States public/private health insurance system functions. It will provide future health services leaders with a working knowledge of the interrelationships between public programs and private insurance and approaches to cost control using risk management, provider reimbursement, benefit design and other approaches.
  • Competencies: 1. Improvement in writing, presentation and analytic skills, focused on framing issues and developing logical approaches to the resolution of issues. 2. Practical understanding of how the private insurance market functions, including how the market is segmented and the competencies required for each segment. 3. Understanding of the impact of risk on private insurance and techniques that are utilized to manage and mitigate the influence of risk selection. 4. Identification of the different international models for health care financing and coverage and the unique aspects of the American system. 5. Appreciation of the distinction between lowering costs to improve competitive advantage and lowering overall health care costs and the tactics and strategies that could be developed for each approach. 6. Understanding of the challenges that confront the future viability of public health insurance programs, including assessment of the options that will be considered, and the strengths and weaknesses of centralized versus decentralized administrative models. 7. Improved skills in working with groups to evaluate and craft potential solutions to policy issues. 8. Recognize the challenges inherent in balancing affordability, access and quality in public and private health insurance programs and the tradeoffs that are required to achieve a mix that meets purchaser and political requirements.
  • Syllabus for HMP633

HMP636 Risk Management and Policy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Vinsel, Lee
  • Not offered 2018-2019
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: Modern societies are dealing with a growing array of risks, including environmental pollution, communicable diseases, new technologies, and complex financial systems. Students will learn how governments try to manage risks through policymaking. How do they protect citizens and maintain their legitimacy and credibility without unduly restricting freedoms or stifling innovation?
  • Course Goals: To teach students: 1) theoretical approaches to risk and governance. 2) to introduce students to different ways that governments deal with risk and society; to help students understand policy controversies related to risk. 3) to discuss alternative possibilities for policy related to risk.
  • Competencies: There are no required prerequisites for the course but an understanding of the policy process is recommended. Students will develop their political and policy analysis and oral/written communication skills in the course.
  • This course is cross-listed with PubPol 659.

HMP643 Managing People in Health Organizations

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Dotson, Ebbin
  • Prerequisites: grad status
  • Description: This course provides the knowledge and skills for understanding and effectively managing individuals and groups within health care organizations. We consider a wide variety of motivations that draw individuals to their jobs and keep them productive. We also consider why organizations form small groups and the dynamics of these groups over time. Students learn techniques for persuasive communication and conflict management, develop strategies for dealing with interpersonal problems in an organizational setting, and processes for handling work teams. Common organizational problems that students solve include choosing the right person through the hiring process, evaluating employee performance, and negotiating contracts.
  • Syllabus for HMP643

HMP644 Strategic Planning and Marketing in Health Care

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Banaszak-Holl, Jane
  • Prerequisites: HMP 600, HMP 601 or HMP 602 or PI
  • Description: Covers general concepts of strategic planning for business development and marketing as applied to health care settings. Topics include: assessing and understanding the needs of key customer groups; health consumer behavior; market segmentation and targeting; clinical staff needs and relations; forecasting service demand; new product development; product pricing and distribution; advertising and public relations; analysis of collaborative and competitive environments, and strategy formulation. Potential conflicts between an organization's business objectives and its participation with competitors in collaborative community benefit programs are also explored. In the 3 credit hour version of the course, extra emphasis is placed on experiential learning methodologies for developing health services strategic plans and the exploration of topics key to successful strategic positioning, business development, and marketing in the management of health care services.

HMP652 Health Law

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Haffajee, Rebecca
  • Prerequisites: HMP 600, 601
  • Description: The purpose of this course is to introduce public health students, especially those interested in health administration and management, to the legal issues they are likely to face in managing a health care organization. The goals of the course are for students to understand generally: the functions of and interaction between courts, legislatures, regulators; the role of the courts in health policy and health care delivery; how to recognize legal issues and communicate with attorneys; how law will affect students as strategic thinkers in health care positions; how to apply basic tort and contract principles; and how to apply basic corporate law and antitrust principles. Specific topics will vary, but will usually include: liability; health care institutions as corporations; antitrust; tax exemption; privacy and confidentiality; regulatory oversight of health care systems, including quality of care; legal requirements for access to health care; nondiscrimination; and general employment issues. This class can be taken as an elective or in fulfillment of the law/politics requirement.
  • Syllabus for HMP652

HMP654 Operations Research and Control Systems

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Hutton, David; Mendez, David;
  • Prerequisites: Biostat 503 or Biostat 553 or equiv and Grad Status
  • Description: Provides rational framework for decision making for both operating and control systems in the hospital environment. Emphasizes basic modeling techniques and examples of actual hospital applications. Aims at thorough understanding of concepts of total value analysis, objective function formation, and exception reporting. Students become familiar with operations research techniques of inventory modeling, queuing, computer simulation, PERT/CPM, mathematical programming, and quality control. Presentation emphasizes objectives, constraints, and required assumptions of each of these techniques as applied to specific hospital examples.
  • Syllabus for HMP654

HMP660 Economics of Health Management and Policy I

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Hirth, Richard
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course covers the principles of microeconomic theory and the fundamental concepts of the field of health economics. The purpose of the course is to give you experience analyzing health management and health policy issues using economic tools.
  • Syllabus for HMP660

HMP661 Managing Health Informatics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Adler-Milstein, Julia
  • Prerequisites: Introduction to Health Informatics
  • Description: The course will prepare students to take on management challenges faced in health informatics leadership roles within a variety of organizational settings. It will be a highly interactive course in which students will have the opportunity to apply theory when discussing real-world health informatics scenarios from a variety of perspectives.
  • Course Goals: (1) To equip students with the relevant theories and health informatics content knowledge to become effective leaders within health-related organizations. (2) To expose students to real-world managerial decisions in the health informatics domain. (3) To enable students to consider multiple dimensions of decisions in uncertain and ambiguous scenarios and articulate the justification for their chosen approach.
  • Competencies: Domain 1: Measurement and Analysis Measurement: A.8 Operational analysis: Analyze, design, or improve an organizational process, including the use of quality management, process improvement, marketing and information technology principles and tools. A.10 Decision Making: Implement a decision-making process that incorporates evidence from a broad analysis that includes uncertainty, risk, stakeholders, and organizational values. Domain 2: Communication B.1 Convey: Speak and write in a clear, logical, and grammatical manner in formal and informal situations; prepare cogent business presentations; facilitate an effective group process.* B.2 Listen: Receive, process, and respond appropriately to information conveyed by others. B.3 Interact: Perceive and respond appropriately to the spoken, unspoken or partly expressed thoughts, feelings, and concerns of others.* Domain 3: Leadership C.1 Organizational Vision: Through effective governance, establish an organization's values, vision, and mission; systematically enhance performance and human, material and knowledge resources. C.2 Strategic Orientation: Analyze the business, demographic, ethno-cultural, political, and regulatory implications of decisions and develop strategies that continually improve the long-term success and viability of the organization.* C.4 Change Leadership: Energize stakeholders and sustain their commitment to the organization while adapting to changes in the environment.* C.6 Impact and Influence: Persuade and convince others, both individuals and groups, to support a point of view, position, or recommendation.* C.7 Organizational Awareness: Understand and learn from governance structures, formal and informal decision-making structures, and power relationships in an organization, industry, or community. C.8 Project Management: Plan, oversee, and successfully execute large-scale projects involving significant resources, scope and impact.* Domain 5: Professional Development Self-Awareness: E.2 Develop an accurate view of own strengths and developmental needs, including the impact one has on others.* E.3 Continuously push self to raise personal standards of performance and exceed expectations. E.4 Address knowledge, skills, and other developmental gaps through reflective, self-directed learning, and by trying new approaches.*
  • This course is cross-listed with SI 661.

HMP668 Introduction to Health Informatics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Graduate status
  • Description: This course introduces students to the concepts and practices of health informatics. Topics include: a) an introduction to the health informatics field; b) major applications and commercial vendors; c) decision support methods and technologies; d) analysis, design, implementation, and evaluation of healthcare information systems; and e) new opportunities and emerging trends. A semester-long group project provides students with hands-on experience in planning and building healthcare information systems; associated ethical and legal topics, software engineering and human-computer interaction issues, and user adoption and outcome evaluation methodologies will also be addressed.
  • This course is cross-listed with SI542, BI668 in the School of Information, School of Medicine (tentative), and Bioinformatics Graduate Program at Center for Computational Medicine and Biology (tentative) department.
  • Syllabus for HMP668

HMP669 Database Systems and Internet Applications in Health Care

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Not offered 2018-2019
  • Prerequisites: Grad status
  • Description: This course covers relation database theory and database-web systems with applications to health care. The students are expected to develop a working knowledge of design, implementation, administration and maintenance of small to medium relational database systems. The students will also be exposed to current technology for deployment, use and administration of relational databases through the Internet.
  • Syllabus for HMP669

HMP677 Health Care Organization: An International Perspective

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Liang, Jersey
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Description: Course examines health care systems in approximately eight developed and developing nations (e.g., United States, Germany, Japan, Canada, United Kingdom, China, Mexico, and Kenya). Comparisons made in: population health, health care financing and control,health professionals and their patients, health care organization, and health system performance and reform strategies.

HMP680 Special Topics in Health Management and Policy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: Lecture, seminars and readings selected on a current or emerging topic or theme in health, management and policy. The specific material and format will vary by semester and instructor.
  • Course Goals: Will vary by topic and instructor.
  • Competencies: Will vary by topic and instructor.

HMP683 Quality of Care

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s):
  • Not offered 2018-2019
  • Prerequisites: HMP 601 or HMP 602
  • Description: Focuses on the concepts and practices of quality of care assessment, control, and improvement in health care delivery settings. Designed to provide an in-depth understanding of basic concepts and frameworks and of their applicability and relevance in specific situations. Covers major approaches to quality of care assessment, improvement, and control currently in use in the health care field.
  • Syllabus for HMP683

HMP690 Readings in Health Management and Policy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status and Perm Instr
  • Description: Directed readings or research on selected topics and problems relevant to health management and policy. May be elected more than once.

HMP693 Mental Health Policy in the United States

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Eisenberg, Daniel
  • Not offered 2018-2019
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status
  • Description: The course uses an interactive, seminar format to analyze major policy problems and opportunities related to mental health. The course focuses on two interrelated questions: which programs and policies represent the best investments in mental health for children and youth, and are we making those investments as a society?
  • Syllabus for HMP693

HMP696 Concepts in Health Informatics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Adler-Milstein, Julia
  • Prerequisites: Graduate status
  • Description: This course provides students a formal framework in which to discuss contemporary topics in health informatics. Topics include: architecture, interoperability, usability, public policy, outreach and patient-centric care and technology-enhanced computation.
  • Course Goals: To provide students an overview of key concepts and methodologies in biomedical (health) informatics research.
  • Competencies: Information seeking; Critical thinking; Qualitative & quantitative analysis; Communication.
  • Learning Objectives: To develop essential skills of conducting successful biomedical (health) informatics research or research-alike activities (e.g., health IT outcomes evaluation) at the technical, sociotechnical, organizational, and system levels to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of adoption of information technologies in healthcare.
  • This course is cross-listed with BIOINF555 in the Bioinformatics Graduate Program, Center for Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, The University of Michigan Medical School. department.
  • Syllabus for HMP696

HMP802 Introduction to Health Services and Policy Research

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Ryan, Andrew
  • Prerequisites: First-year HSOP student or permission of instructor
  • Description: This is a doctoral-level introductory course to health services and policy research. The course involves a general survey of substantive issues in health services and policy research and a critical analysis of theories and research designs that are used to advance knowledge of those issues.
  • Course Goals: The purpose of the course is to foster your development into a health services and policy researcher. To accomplish this, the course involves a general survey of substantive issues in health services research and a critical analysis of theories and research designs that are used to advance knowledge of those issues. By the end of the course you should have knowledge of the main institutions, policy issues, and research areas and questions that pertain to health services research. You should also have an initial understanding of where the most promising and pressing areas of research lie within this field. Thus, this course is about the past, present, and future of the field.
  • Competencies: *Broad knowledge of health services and policy research (main topics, seminal papers, range of disciplinary approaches) *Critical analysis of empirical studies in this field *Conduct of a review synthesizing previous empirical studies

HMP803 Doctoral Seminar in Health Services and Systems Research I

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Liang, Jersey
  • Description: The health services research module will provide an introduction to the philosophy, history, and approaches of health services research and a sample of research topics that have been approached by health services systems researchers.
  • Course Goals: The health services research module will provide an introduction to the philosophy, history, and approaches of health services research and a sample of research topics that have been approached by health services systems researchers.
  • Competencies: This course will contribute to basic knowledge competencies in understanding the field of health services research and its applications, as well as conceptual competencies regarding the framing of useful and answerable questions within this field.
  • Learning Objectives: Students should gain a better understanding of the content of the field of health services research and the diverse approaches and uses of this research.

HMP804 Doctoral Seminar in Health Services and Systems Research II

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mendez, David; Hutton, David; Prosser, Lisa;
  • Description: HMP804/Medical Sociology and Organizational Theory Module consists of six 2.5-hour weekly sessions, and it will be conducted as a seminar. Before each session, all students are expected to complete the required reading assignments in preparation for a lively and informed discussion in class. In addition, each student is expected to submit a study log, which should include one's reactions, reflections, and questions for discussion. At each session, there will be a division of labor among students in summarizing the assigned readings and leading a discussion of them. The discussion will center on conceptual, analytical, and applied issues, whereas the instructor will serve as the moderator and a sounding board.
  • Course Goals: Within the HSOP curriculum, students studying sociology can choose to focus on either medical sociology or organizational studies. This module provides all HSOP students to an overview of the theory and methods of each of these sub-fields. Sociology provides a unique set of lenses in defining, understanding, and interpreting issues related to health and health care. The HMP 804 aims to provide an initial overview of medical sociology and organizational studies. In addition, it offers several illustrations of how selected sociological perspectives (i.e., social stratification, life course, and theories of how organizations respond to their environments) can be applied to research in public health and analysis of health policy issues. Finally, a session will allow an in depth discussion of medical sociology and organizational studies as applied to research and policy analysis related to obesity.
  • Competencies: To receive credit for the module, students are expected to attend all sessions, read the assigned articles, and provide feedback that demonstrates an understanding of the key points of the readings and discussion.
  • Learning Objectives: Students will gain an initial understanding of the sociological and organizational approaches in health services research and public health. In particular, the students will be exposed selected sociological paradigms, analytical methods, and how they are applied to the analysis of population health, health care, and related policy issues.
  • Syllabus for HMP804

HMP815 Readings in Medical Care

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Liang, Jersey
  • Prerequisites: Perm Instr
  • Description: Directed readings in special areas. May be elected more than once. Primarily for doctoral students in Health Services Organization and Policy.

HMP827 Advanced Seminar in Health Care Economics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): McCullough, Jeffrey
  • Prerequisites: Econ 501 and Perm Instr
  • Description: Analysis of the application of advanced economic theory to problems in the health services field. Focuses on several health economics issues, including topics of current policy interest as well as topics for which the application of economic theory has been more fully explored, Classes will include a general discussion of the appropriate economic theory and empirical evidence and a critical review of the relevant health economics literature. Students must read approximately 30-40 articles and write several short papers.

HMP833 Research Topics in Sociology and Health Care Organization

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: HMP doctoral students or P.I.
  • Description: HSOP Program requirements. A topic in sociology and health care organization-policy is selected each term for detailed critical, theoretical, and methodological analysis leading to development, in class, of propositions aimed at advancing scientific status of the area of inquiry. Analysis and development of content follows logic of the research paradigm. Required of students with a sociology cognate in the doctoral program in Health Services Organization and Policy

HMP835 Research Practicum

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 3-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: HMP 809, Perm Instr
  • Description: The purpose of this course is to allow each student, early in his or her doctoral career, to gain experience in the actual performance of health services research. The experience will enable students to build sound research skills and to gain knowledge of the nature of inquiry in their discipline as well as in the field of health services research. Each student in the HSOP program is expected to elect a total of 6 credits in HMP 835.

HMP990 Dissertation/Precandidates

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to status as candidate.

HMP995 Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Spring-Summer, Summer term(s)
  • 8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students admitted as candidates

PUBHLTH626 Understanding and Improving the US Healthcare System

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Goold, Susan; Bell Farris, Karen;
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Provides an asynchronous, engaging, and interactive way to understand the U.S. healthcare system and gain insight about the system. This online course requires assigned course work and attendance a 90-minute in-person group session during weeks 4-5 of the course. Registration for group session is required early in the course.

PUBHLTH796 Special Topics in Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-5 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Description: This course will be used by faculty members to teach special or emerging topics related to Public Health. The specific material and format will vary by semester and instructor.
  • Course Goals: Will vary by topic and instructor.
  • Competencies: Will vary by topic and instructor.
  • Learning Objectives: Will vary by topic and instructor.