MI CReSS Data Reports

Michigan COVID-19 Recovery Surveillance Study - Data Report 4: Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Differences in Access to Care, Recovery, and the Social Impact of COVID-19 - February 2022

Hispanic and Non Hispanic White Key Findings:
  • More Hispanic than NH White respondents reported very severe symptoms (25.6% vs. 11.4%). In addition, among hospitalized respondents, Hispanic respondents were more likely than NH White respondents to have a hospital stay lasting longer than one week (74.1% vs. 36.7%).
  • More Hispanic (10.8%) than NH White (1.6%) respondents reported that their COVID-19 testing or treatment made them feel emotionally upset due to how they were treated based on their race.
  • Hispanic respondents were more likely than NH White respondents to report that their stress levels worsened during the pandemic (67.0% vs. 54.6%).
  • More Hispanic than NH White respondents reported increased social stressors since the start of the pandemic, such as being unable to pay important bills, get enough food or healthy food, access clean water, arrange childcare, and get needed medications.
  • Among employed respondents, more Hispanic (84.8%) than NH White respondents (66.5%) took sick leave during their illness. However, paid sick leave was less common for Hispanic than NH White respondents (65.4% vs. 79.8%).
  • Among employed respondents, Hispanic respondents reported that they never or rarely had access to personal protective equipment at work more often than NH White respondents (29.2% vs. 14.9%).
US-born Hispanic and Foreign-born Hispanic Key Findings:
  • Fewer US-born than foreign-born Hispanic respondents reported increased social stressors since the start of the pandemic, such as being unable to pay important bills or difficulty getting places due to less access to public transportation or concerns about safety.
  • Among employed respondents, fewer US-born (75.6%) than foreign-born Hispanic respondents (90.6%) took sick leave during their illness; paid sick leave was more common for US-born than foreign-born Hispanic respondents (76.3% vs. 59.7%).
  • Among employed respondents, 24.9% of US-born and 31.8% of foreign-born Hispanic respondents reported that they never or rarely had access to personal protective equipment at work.

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Estudio de Vigilancia sobre Recuperación de COVID-19 de Michigan (MI CReSS, por sus siglas en inglés) - 4to reporte de resultados: Diferencias en el acceso a la atención, la recuperación y el impacto social de COVID-19 entre hispanos y blancos no hispanos - Febrero 2022

Resultados principales entre hispanos y blancos no hispanos:
  • Una mayor proporción de los encuestados hispanos reportó síntomas muy severos por COVID-19 en comparación con los encuestados blancos no hispanos (25.6% vs 11.4%). Adicionalmente, entre los encuestados que requirieron hospitalización los hispanos reportaron en mayor proporción tener una estadía de más de una semana en el hospital, en comparación con los encuestados blancos no hispanos (71.4% VS 36.7%).
  • Una mayor proporción de encuestados hispanos (10.8%) reportó sentir molestia emocional debido a la forma en que fueron tratados en función de su raza o grupo étnico en comparación con solo el 1.6% de los encuestados blancos no hispanos.
  • Los encuestados hispanos reportaron que sus niveles de estrés empeoraron durante la pandemia en mayor proporción en comparación con los encuestados blancos no hispanos (67.0% vs 54.6%).
  • Los encuestados hispanos reportaron que las dificultades para el pago de facturas importantes y el acceso a servicios básicos (alimentos saludables, agua limpia, servicios de cuidado de niños, medicamentos necesarios y transporte público) aumentaron desde el inicio de la pandemia en mayor proporción en comparación con los encuestados blancos no hispanos.
  • Entre los encuestados empleados, el 84.8% de los hispanos se ausentaron del trabajo durante su enfermedad de COVID-19 en comparación con el 66.5% de los blancos no hispanos. Sin embargo, la ausencia por enfermedad pagada fue menos común para los encuestados hispanos que para los blancos no hispanos (65.4% vs 79.8%; respectivamente).
  • Entre los encuestados empleados, el 29.2% de los hispanos informaron que nunca o casi nunca tuvieron acceso a equipo de protección personal en el trabajo contra COVID-19, en comparación con el 14.9% reportado por los encuestados blancos no hispanos.
Resultados Principales entre Hispanos nacidos en EE. UU. e Hispanos nacidos en el extranjero:
  • Los encuestados hispanos nacidos en EE. UU. reportaron que las dificultades para el pago de facturas importantes y el acceso al transporte público aumentaron desde el inicio de la pandemia en menor proporción, en comparación con los encuestados hispanos nacidos en el extranjero.
  • Entre los encuestados empleados, los hispanos nacidos en EE. UU. (75.6%) se ausentaron menos al trabajo en comparación con los hispanos nacidos en el extranjero (90.6%) durante su enfermedad por COVID-19. Sin embargo, la ausencia por enfermedad pagada fue más común para los encuestados hispanos nacidos en los EE. UU. en comparación con los hispanos nacidos en el extranjero (76.3% vs. 59.7%).
  • Entre los encuestados empleados, el 24.9% de los hispanos nacidos en EE. UU. y el 31.8% de los hispanos nacidos en el extranjero informaron que nunca o casi nunca tenían acceso a equipo de protección personal en el trabajo. 

Descargue el informe en español. Hispanos. Febrero 2022

Disability status before and after COVID-19 illness among Michiganders diagnosed with COVID-19 in 2020 - February 2022

  • After their COVID-19 illness, 27% of all respondents with illness onset between October 1 – November 15, 2020, indicated having some type of disability, compared to 15% before illness.
  • The prevalence of having difficulty walking or climbing stairs; serious difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions; blindness or serious difficulty seeing; or any functional disability was significantly higher after respondents’ COVID-19 illness compared to before their illness.
  • Women, NH White respondents, and respondents with a household income of $75,000 or more had significantly higher prevalence of any functional disability after their COVID-19 illness compared to before their illness. 
  • Prevalence of mobility disability was significantly higher after COVID-19 illness than prior to illness for both men and women, and among respondents who were aged 35 or older, Hispanic, NH White, or had household income less than $75,000.
  • Almost 30% of all NH Black respondents reported having a mobility disability after their COVID-19 illness. Mobility disability prevalence was higher for NH Black respondents compared to NH White respondents both before and after COVID-19 illness.
  • Respondents classified as obese had a significantly higher prevalence of any functional disability and mobility disability after their COVID-19 illness than prior to their illness.

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Michigan COVID-19 Recovery Surveillance Study Data Report 3: Experiences of Working Adults with COVID-19 Onset Prior to June 1, 2020, in Michigan - September 13, 2021

  • Among the 869 adult respondents with COVID-19 onset prior to June 1, 2020 who reported employment status, 72.8% were employed. Employed respondents were predominantly female (56.0%), non-Hispanic White (50.4%) or non-Hispanic Black (24.7%), and 46 years old on average. Prior to their COVID-19 onset, 72.1% of respondents were required to work in-person and 27.9% worked remotely.
  • A disproportionate share of COVID-19 cases among working adults in Michigan were in the Health Care and Social Assistance industry sector, which represented 44.0% of diagnosed COVID-19 cases in Michigan with onset prior to June 1, 2020, but only 15.1% of Michigan’s total employed individuals in 2019.
  • Adequate PPE availability varied greatly across industry. Among Transportation Equipment workers, who reported the lowest PPE availability, only 27.3% reported having adequate PPE “often” or “always.” In Hospitals, where the highest availability of PPE was reported in our sample, 58.9% reported having adequate PPE “often” or “always.”
  • The use of sick leave differed by industry. The proportion of in-person workers who were paid for their time off was lowest among Nursing and Residential Care Facility (73.1%) and Food Manufacturing (74.5%) workers.
  • Among employed respondents who knew the source of their exposure (63.8%), 60.5% said they were exposed at work. The most affected occupation was Healthcare Support, with 81.5% of employed respondents who knew their source of exposure reporting that they were exposed to COVID-19 at work.

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Michigan COVID-19 Recovery Surveillance Study Data Report 2: Black-White Differences in Access to Care, Recovery, and the Social Impact of COVID-19 - January 29, 2021

  • Black COVID-19 survivors had a more severe disease course than White respondents. More Black than White respondents reported severe or very severe symptoms (72.9% vs. 60.5%) or required an overnight hospital stay (45.4% vs. 27.9%).
  • Black respondents reported poorer experiences than White respondents when attempting to access COVID-19 care.
    • 8.7% of Black respondents believed their experiences seeking healthcare were worse than people from other races, while 18.9% of White respondents believed their experiences were better than people from other races.
    • 10.6% of Black respondents (vs. 1.6% of White respondents) reported that their COVID-19 testing or treatment made them feel emotionally upset due to how they were treated based on their race.
  • More Black respondents reported increased social stressors since the start of the pandemic, with 25.6% being unable to pay important bills like mortgage, rent, or utilities (vs. 10.3% of White respondents).
  • More Black respondents (23.0%) were afraid to disclose their COVID-19 status to their friends or family than White respondents (9.8%).

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Michigan COVID-19 Recovery Surveillance Study - October 2020

  • Nearly a quarter (23.0%) of respondents waited more than a week to seek medical care following COVID-19 symptom onset.
  • At the time of survey completion, 26.2% of respondents had not recovered from COVID-19 to their usual state of health. Among those who had recovered, there was a wide range in symptom duration, ranging from less than 1 week to 18 weeks.
  • The COVID-19 outbreak worsened stress levels and mental health for 52.7% of respondents.
  • When asked about challenges faced by themselves or their family members since the pandemic began, nearly 60% reported experiencing a loss of employment or reduction in hours worked and nearly 20% reported being unable to pay important bills.
  • More than two-thirds (68.6%) of employed respondents had to physically report to work following the "Stay Home, Stay Safe" executive order. Among employed respondents, 34.0% did not take sick leave during their COVID-19 illness.

DOWNLOAD THE OCTOBER 2020 REPORT