Nutritional Sciences Fall Term Courses

NUTR547 Food Science

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Aaronson, Susan
  • Offered every other year
  • Last offered Fall 2009
  • Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry
  • Description: An examination of food composition and the chemical and physical changes that result from food processing, preparation and cooking. Discussion of foods as complex systems containing a wide variety of chemicals including nutrients, phytochemicals, functional ingredients, natural or transferred toxins and additives. Discussion of changes in chemicals with different types of food preservation. Consideration of health risks associated with dietary exposure to selected nutrients and other chemicals. Exploration of the role of sensory analysis related to food acceptance. Overview of important regulations related to the content of food products.

NUTR555 Foundations of Sustainable Food Systems

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Jones, Andrew
  • Prerequisites: None.
  • Description: This course teaches about food systems through interdisciplinary, experiential learning and dialogue-based inquiry. In addition to learning how to bridge worldviews and apply systems thinking, students will study the unique perspectives of public health nutritionists involved in addressing complex food systems problems.
  • Course Goals: During this course, students will: 1) study the characteristics, outcomes, objectives and values of different contemporary food systems in the Global North and South; 2) analyze and critique peer-reviewed literature examining the processes and outcomes of food systems models through an interdisciplinary lens; 3) practice communicating ideas about food systems in oral presentations to peers in a group setting; 4) participate as a member of a multidisciplinary team; 5) engage with food systems stakeholders in classroom and field settings; and 6) explore their own and others' diverse values and viewpoints about food systems based on supporting evidence.
  • Competencies: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) describe key concepts across disciplines and perspectives related to sustainable food systems; 2) evaluate assumptions and values about food systems that underpin one's own thinking and that of others; 3) apply and synthesize scientific evidence in support of arguments that address food systems research questions; 4) analyze and critically evaluate food systems research results for evidence-based assessments and ethical decision-making; 5) communicate clearly and effectively about food systems through writing and oral presentations in a professional setting of diverse peers; and 6) engage in respectful dialogue, collaborative teamwork, and problem-solving with those of differing viewpoints and backgrounds.

NUTR578 Practical Projects

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Practical Projects is the application of theory and principles of Nutritional Sciences to individual community-based public health settings. Course requirements include an approved practical project related to Nutritional Sciences in consultation with a faculty advisor. The experience is documented in an integrative paper demonstrating the scientific application of NS theories and principles to the practical project. May be elected more than once. Enrollment is limited to NS students with at least two full terms completed prior to registration.
  • Course Goals: To provide students with the opportunity to apply theory and principles of Nutritional Sciences to individual community-based public health settings.
  • Competencies: Depending upon the agency and type of work, the following competencies will be met: 1.Gather, evaluate and interpret nutrition information to assess, plan, implement, and evaluate food and nutrition programs. 2.Utilize appropriate nutritional assessment methods to prioritize nutrition concerns of individuals and target populations. 3.Assess populations in organizational and population-based settings through collection of quantitative and qualitative data. 4.Apply theoretical frameworks and research evidence to inform public health actions. 5.Apply epidemiologic and statistical methods to nutrition assessment, action, and/or evaluation.

NUTR600 Professional Development in the Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Olivia
  • Prerequisites: Grad Status, Completion of approved internship, research or practical experience
  • Description: This is a capstone course for Nutritional Sciences Master of Public Health students as they transition from a novice to an expert from the first to second year of the degree program. In this course, students will apply the knowledge learned from the curriculum and field experience to real-life applications.

NUTR621 Eating Disorders Prevention & Treatment

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Sonneville, Kendrin
  • Prerequisites: STAT250 or STAT280 or BIOSTATS501/521 (concurrent)
  • Undergraduates are allowed to enroll in this course.
  • Description: This course is designed to introduce students to eating disorders using a public health framework. Students will examine primary, secondary, and tertiary approaches to eating disorders prevention and will be exposed to topics relevant to public health, including integrating obesity and eating disorders prevention.

NUTR624 Nutritional Epidemiology

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Baylin, Ana
  • Prerequisites: EPID503, EPID 600 or EPID 601
  • Description: This course is designed for Master students in the Department of Nutritional Sciences who are interested in conducting or better interpreting epidemiologic studies on nutrition and disease. The course will review methodological issues involved in the design, conduct, analysis and interpretation of studies investigating the relationship between diet and disease.
  • Course Goals: 1. Understand methodological concepts on Nutritional Epidemiology 2. Demonstrate a working knowledge of the main methods used in Nutritional Epidemiology 3. Synthesize and interpret the scientific literature on Nutritional Epidemiology.

NUTR625 Nutrition and the Immune Response

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mancuso, Peter
  • Prerequisites: any BIOLOGY course from 100-400
  • Description: Food and nutritional status have a profound influence on immune function. Food and nutritional status can maintain immune homeostasis, contribute to immune suppression, enhance chronic inflammation, or provoke an allergic response.The course consists of lectures on basic principles of immunology and presentations and discussion of peer-reviewed literature.

NUTR630 Principles of Nutritional Science

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Olivia; Bridges, Dave;
  • Description: This course presents foundational knowledge on nutritional metabolism of macronutrients. The digestion, absorption, transport, utilization and storage of macronutrients in humans are the focus. This course integrates biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrient utilization, interactions and metabolic regulation in humans.

NUTR636 Medical Nutrition Therapy I

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Hudson, Liz
  • Prerequisites: EHS 630
  • Description: Medical nutrition therapy and disease pathophysiology taught for malnutrition, starvation, metabolic stress, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, pulmonary and neoplasm. Current controversies are briefly introduced. Clinical nutrition screening, assessment, use of clinical laboratory data, and physical assessment are also introduced.

NUTR638 Nutrigenomics

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Seo, Young-Ah
  • Description: This course aims to understand, in depth, the influence of genetics on micronutrient metabolism, and implications for human diseases including inherited inborn disease, metabolic disease, cancer, neurodevelopment, and neurodegenerative diseases, etc.
  • Course Goals: Students taking this course are expected to learn about: 1. Etiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of micronutrient related human genetic disorders 2. Interactions of micronutrients with human disease states 3. Influence of genetic variation on nutritional requirement 4. Role of genetics in human nutrient metabolism 5. Regulation of genetics on cellular and molecular metabolism
  • Competencies: After taking this course, students should be able to: 1. Understand etiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of human genetic disorders 2. Understand interactions of micronutrients with human disease 3. Identify clinical symptoms associated with the pathophysiology of human genetic disorders 4. Understand the cellular and physiological mechanisms that cause human genetic disorders 5. Suggest potential mechanisms by which specific dietary factors contribute to treatment of diseases
  • Learning Objectives: Students taking this course are expected to learn about: 1. Etiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of micronutrient related human genetic disorders 2. Interactions of micronutrients with human disease states 3. Influence of genetic variation on nutritional requirement 4. Role of genetics in human nutrient metabolism 5. Regulation of genetics on cellular and molecular metabolism

NUTR639 Pathophysiology of Obesity

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mancuso, Peter
  • Prerequisites: NUTR 630
  • Description: This course provides a framework for understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of obesity. The course content will emphasize the influence of physiologic factors that contribute to overconsumption of food, the pathophysiologic consequences of obesity, and current methods of treatment.
  • Course Goals: The goal for students taking this course is to learn about: 1) Assessment and interpretation of body composition in adult and pediatric populations; 2) the influence of diet behavioral modification pharmacologic and surgical interventions.
  • Competencies: Following the completion of this course students who complete this course are expected to be able to: 1) Define categories of overweight or obesity given body composition information; 2) Identify important contributing factors to weight gain and the inappropriate consumption of food; 3) Suggest appropriate strategies in the prevention of obesity; 4) Identify eating disorders and suggest appropriate intervention; 5) Understand the neurophysiologic mechanisms that control feeding behavior; 6) Describe how endocrine and adipose derived factors influence food intake and the development of chronic disease; 7) Identify clinical symptoms associated with the pathophysiology of obesity; 8) Suggest potential mechanisms by which specific dietary behavioral factors and physical activity contribute to weight gain and loss; and 9) Apply knowledge of the role of environment food and lifestyle choices to develop interventions to affect change and enhance wellness in diverse individuals and populations.

NUTR640 Nutritional Assessment

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Cole, Suzanne
  • Prerequisites: EHS 630, Nutrition Science
  • Description: This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the methods and approaches for conducting nutrition assessment of individuals and populations throughout the lifecycle. The course is structured into three assessment components: dietary, biochemical, and body size and body composition. Main topics include in-depth overview of the assessment methods, strengths and limitations of methodology, evaluation and interpretation of assessment data, sources of measurement errors, validity of assessment methods, and basic analytical approaches used to interpret assessment data.

NUTR642 Community Nutrition

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Cole, Suzanne
  • Prerequisites: EHS 630
  • Description: This course is a discussion of the principles and programs developed to improve the dietary intake and the nutritional status of individuals and groups within a community. Primary topics covered include: government and nongovernment nutrition-related programs, groups at nutritional risk, nutritional issues/concerns across the lifecycle, and an introduction to developing community-based nutrition intervention programs (needs assessment, intervention, and evaluation). Didactic lectures and guest presentations accompanied with an in-depth needs assessment and intervention project and a community service-learning component will provide students the opportunity to integrate and apply knowledge through a hands-on approach.

NUTR644 Global Food Systems Policy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Jones, Andrew
  • Prerequisites: None.
  • Description: This course will explore the process of developing policies in low- and middle-income countries that are targeted at altering the nature and functioning of food systems. We will assess policy contexts, stakeholders' priorities, the translation of policies into programs, and the impacts of policies on nutrition and health outcomes.
  • Course Goals: During this course, students will: 1) read and critically analyze food systems policy analysis and policy case studies; 2) practice communicating critical analysis of research and policies through formal presentations; 3) facilitate in-class discussion amongst peers; 4) practice designing and developing policy case studies that involve critical analysis of the policy process; 5) practice receiving constructive feedback from peers and incorporating it into theoretical thinking and writing; and 6) provide respectful and thoughtful feedback to their peers.
  • Competencies: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 1) understand definitions, concepts, and principles related to the policy process, the formation of food systems policies globally, and their impacts on nutritional outcomes relevant to public health; 2) analyze and critically evaluate food systems policies; 3) apply and synthesize evidence to design and develop policy recommendations for food systems change that have direct relevance to public health nutrition; 4) communicate clearly and effectively through oral presentations and discussions with diverse peers; and 5) engage in respectful dialogue with those of differing viewpoints and backgrounds.
  • Syllabus for NUTR644

NUTR688 Research Topics in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Seo, Young-Ah
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course will introduce students to current topics in nutrition research. Students will attend seminars focused on research that will demonstrate the impact of nutrition on human health. Students are encouraged to pose questions to the speaker and write 5-7 bullet points that provide a summary of each presentation.

NUTR697 Readings in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Supervised study/review of a selected topic in nutritional sciences. May be elected more than once for a maximum of six credits.

NUTR698 Research in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Original research investigation of a special topic in nutritional sciences.

NUTR699 Masters Thesis in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm of Thesis Advisor
  • Description: This course shall be elected by students enrolled in Master's degree programs that require a formal written thesis as a condition of program completion. The thesis shall be defended in front of the student's thesis committee. The course grade will reflect the student's accomplishments relative to the thesis and its defense. The course is to be elected only once.

NUTR796 Special Topics in Nutritional Sciences

NUTR830 Advanced Topics in Macronutrient Metabolism

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Bridges, Dave
  • Prerequisites: NUTR630 and NUTR631
  • Description: This course is an elective designed for research-based molecular nutrition students. It will introduce topics and methods in biochemical and molecular nutrition research. We will use group discussions and individual projects to enhance critical analysis skills and learn how to follow in the rapidly advancing field of molecular nutrition.
  • Course Goals: * To provide advanced knowledge on macromolecular nutrition. * Learn to evaluate research articles in molecular nutrition. * Familiarize students with current methods in molecular nutrition research.
  • Competencies: * Generate out a literature review on a emerging topic related to molecular nutrition. * Produce a review of a research article on the basis of its premise, methods, interpretation and congruence with previous results. * Formulate alternative methods to assess or advance a finding. * Generate a research proposal that would test a novel hypothesis and propose methodologies to test it. * Evaluate a research proposal according to NIH criteria including assessment of novelty and proposed approach. * Participate in a mock review panel to judge an innovative research proposal. * Analytically discuss research with colleagues and future employers.
  • Learning Objectives: * Develop high critical thinking skills such as synthesis and projecting future studies within recent macromolecular nutrition topics. * Learn how to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of nutrition research. * Gain fluency in the molecular nutrition literature including how to assess the validity of claims. * Familiarize yourself with the process of developing research grant proposals and reviews. * Identify limitations in research articles, and how this affects the rigor and universality of their conclusions. * Interpret and evaluate modern molecular nutrition methods based on their implementation and appropriate controls. * Evaluate emerging themes in macromolecular nutrition that affect individual responses to the diet.

NUTR869 Innovations in Nutrition Research

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Perng, Wei; Peterson, Karen; Staff;
  • Prerequisites: Doctoral, MPH and MS student with demonstrated interest in Nutritional Sciences research (with permission),Doctoral, MPH and MS student with demonstrated interest in Nutritional Sciences research (with permission)
  • Description: The course will include: -integrative discussions of dissertation research projects -presentations of research findings -in-depth literature reviews and critiques -manuscript reviews in Nutritional Sciences
  • Course Goals: Using the techniques that are discussed in the course description and with assistance from the assigned faculty mentor.
  • Competencies: Critical analysis of relevant literature.Practice and refine oral speaking while disseminating scientific information related to research interests in Nutritional Sciences.

NUTR899 Advanced Research in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Must be a PhD student in Nutritional Sciences
  • Description: Original investigations of a specific research topic in Nutritional Sciences. Designed for doctoral students performing research prior to passing their qualifying exams. Students will complete two separate rotations with faculty members for a minimum of 1 credit each. This course may be elected more than once.
  • Course Goals: Expose PhD students to Nutritional Sciences research opportunities in order to assist students in exploring interest areas and a dissertation topic.
  • Competencies: To be determined with the faculty member and the student based upon the research rotation.

NUTR990 Dissertation Research/Pre-Candidate

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Nutritional Sciences Doctoral Student
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to status as a candidate.

NUTR995 Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Nutritional Sciences Doctoral Student
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student who has been admitted to status as a candidate

PUBHLTH511 Nutrition and Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Peterson, Karen; Leung, Cindy;
  • Prerequisites: SPH MPH and SPH MHSA Residential Students Only or By Instructor Permission
  • Description: Introduce MPH students to important topics in nutrition and public health, program planning and program evaluation. PUBHLTH511 is an introductory course to nutrition research and will cover topics, such as healthful diet patterns, methods of dietary assessment, nutritional epidemiology, nutrition through the life cycle, and nutritional needs of diverse populations. This course will have a hybrid style (online & in-class) of instruction.
  • Course Goals: ? Students should be able to apply nutrition indicators for different public health purposes, including: estimating prevalence, monitoring and surveillance, and investigating diet and disease relationships, identifying atrisk individuals and groups, and evaluating programs. ? Students should be able to apply public health conceptual frameworks and nutrition research evidence to inform public health actions. ? Students should be able to use evidence-based knowledge to develop nutrition programs and interventions for diverse populations. ? Students should be able to develop appropriate designs to rigorously monitor and evaluate nutrition programs and policies in diverse contexts.
  • Competencies: Students will learn to assess population needs, assets and capacities that affect communities' health; apply awareness of cultural values and practices to the design or implementation of public health policies or programs; design a population-based policy, program, project or intervention, and select methods to evaluate public health programs.
  • Learning Objectives: Students will be able to: 1) apply nutrition indicators for different public health purposes, including: estimating prevalence, monitoring and surveillance, and investigating diet and disease relationships, identifying at-risk individuals and groups, and evaluating programs; 2) apply public health conceptual frameworks and nutrition research evidence to inform public health actions; 3) use evidence-based knowledge to develop nutrition programs and interventions for diverse populations; and 4) develop appropriate designs to rigorously monitor and evaluate nutrition programs and policies in diverse contexts.