Nutritional Sciences Winter Term Courses

NUTR510 Nutrition in the Life Cycle

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Olivia
  • Prerequisites: Introductory biology and introductory chemistry
  • Description: Nutrition in the Life Cycle will cover nutritional needs of individuals during critical stages of development. Students will learn about the biological basis for nutritional requirements in normal development and maintaining health in adulthood. Consequences of over- and under-nutrition and how to identify and address these issues will be discussed.
  • Course Goals: -Identify the macro- and micronutrients critical for normal human growth and development -Develop an understanding for the biological basis of nutrient requirements during pregnancy and lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and older adulthood (65+) -Recognize the health consequences of under or excess nutrient intake at critical life stages -Understand the rationale for development of dietary guidelines and major nutritional interventions -Understand how additional lifestyle factors (e.g., sleep, exercise) can affect nutrient requirements -Identify socioeconomic and cultural barriers to meeting nutrient needs -Develop an understanding of methodological aspects of the research regarding nutrition in the life cycle
  • Competencies: -Explain the importance of nutrient intake for normal human development and health maintenance throughout the life cycle -Apply biological knowledge of nutrient requirements during critical life stages to address health consequences of a nutrient imbalance -Explain the purpose of dietary guidelines in the United States -Discuss the justification for major nutritional interventions that have occurred in the United States to address health concerns due to nutritional imbalance -Evaluate lifestyle factors when considering nutritional needs of individuals across the life cycle -Demonstrate knowledge and awareness of barriers in our society that prevent individuals to meet nutritional needs -Demonstrate interpretation of methodological aspects and results of the research regarding nutrition in the life cycle
  • This course is cross-listed with PUBHLTH310.

NUTR540 Maternal and Child Nutrition

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Cole, Suzanne
  • Description: This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the nutritional requirements of pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Main topics include: physiologic and metabolic adaptations of pregnancy and lactation, maternal nutrition during pregnancy and lactation, composition of human milk and formula, feeding practices of infants and toddlers, and the nutrient requirements of infants, children, and adolescents. At the conclusion of this course, students will have gained a sufficient foundation in maternal and child nutrition to better understand the relevant scientific literature. Didactic lectures and guest presentations accompanied by class discussions will provide a breadth of maternal and child nutrition knowledge.

NUTR578 Practical Projects

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-4 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Description: Practical Projects is the application of theory and principles of Nutritional Sciences to individual community-based public health settings. Course requirements include an approved practical project related to Nutritional Sciences in consultation with a faculty advisor. The experience is documented in an integrative paper demonstrating the scientific application of NS theories and principles to the practical project. May be elected more than once. Enrollment is limited to NS students with at least two full terms completed prior to registration.
  • Course Goals: To provide students with the opportunity to apply theory and principles of Nutritional Sciences to individual community-based public health settings.
  • Competencies: Depending upon the agency and type of work, the following competencies will be met: 1.Gather, evaluate and interpret nutrition information to assess, plan, implement, and evaluate food and nutrition programs. 2.Utilize appropriate nutritional assessment methods to prioritize nutrition concerns of individuals and target populations. 3.Assess populations in organizational and population-based settings through collection of quantitative and qualitative data. 4.Apply theoretical frameworks and research evidence to inform public health actions. 5.Apply epidemiologic and statistical methods to nutrition assessment, action, and/or evaluation.

NUTR585 Food Service Management

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Haas, Lindsay
  • Offered every year
  • Last offered Winter 2015
  • Prerequisites: Grad status
  • Description: This course examines the principles of food systems management, defing and applying management theories and functions in food and nutrition settings. Human, material and facility management will be discussed. Students gain an understanding of the tools available for managing effective and efficient food and nutrition organizations. Purchasing and inventory techniques will be examined. Using the foodservice systems model as a guide, it shows students how to transform the human, material, facility and operational inputs of the system into outputs of meals, customer satisfaction, employee satisfaction and financial accountability. This course will cover cost control, methods that are specific to managing food service operations, including food waste and theft.

NUTR622 Weight Bias & Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Sonneville, Kendrin
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTATS521 and/or 501
  • Description: This course is designed to introduce students to the pervasiveness and consequences of weight bias. Students will be introduced to weigh-inclusive alternatives (e.g. Health at Every Size) to weight-normative approaches common in public health and health care and will examine issues such as size diversity through a social justice lens.
  • Course Goals: By critically discussing both seminal and cutting-edge papers, students will develop a thorough understanding of the history and origin of weight bias, its pervasiveness, and its consequences.
  • Competencies: Communicate audience-appropriate public health content, both in writing and through oral presentation
  • Learning Objectives: Discuss the science of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention in population health, including health promotion, screening, etc. Explain behavioral and psychological factors that affect a population's health

NUTR626 Controversial topics in the role of nutrition on chronic disease

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Baylin, Ana
  • Prerequisites: EPID 600/503 or equivalent or and BIOSTAT 501/521 or equivalent
  • Description: This public health oriented course will provide students the opportunity to advance their knowledge in nutrition and chronic disease research from a population perspective and help them to better interpret epidemiologic studies on nutrition and chronic disease.
  • Course Goals: Introduce students to the current state of knowledge regarding nutrition and chronic disease.
  • Competencies: Demonstrate a working knowledge of the basic principles of nutrition research, including basic pathophysiology. Demonstrate ability to synthesize and interpret the scientific literature on nutrition and chronic disease. Understand methodological concepts on nutrition and chronic disease research. Be able to evaluate nutritional prevention strategies and dietary guidelines implemented to reduce the burden of chronic disease.
  • This course is cross-listed with EPID 625 in the Epidemiology department.

NUTR631 Metabolism of Vitamins & Minerals

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Cole, Suzanne
  • Prerequisites: EHS 630
  • Description: This course provides an in-depth introduction to vitamin and mineral metabolism with particular emphasis on nutrient bioavailability and absorption, transport and tissue accumulation, regulation of nutrient metabolism and homeostasis, and nutrient function. Other topics include the health effects of inadequate and excessive micronutrient intake, methods used to estimate nutrient requirements and establish nutrient intake reference and upper limit levels. The depth of micronutrient metabolism covered in this course will provide a sufficient background for students to better understand the scientific literature of individual micronutrients. The course will consist of lectures on the major metabolic/regulatory topics for each micronutrient as well as discussions of nutrient-related topics from the current scientific literature.

NUTR633 Evaluation of Global Nutrition Programs

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Jones, Andrew
  • Description: This course will provide students with an understanding of the principles of program evaluation with an emphasis on global nutrition programs. The course will create a space for discussion and practice in which knowledge can be applied to current global nutrition issues through research and critical analysis.
  • Course Goals: By the end of this course students are expected to be able to: 1) identify key principles related to the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of global nutrition interventions; 2) apply and synthesize these principles to develop a global nutrition intervention as well as a comprehensive, field-ready monitoring and evaluation plan; 3) formulate evaluation research questions based on a review of scientific literature; 4) develop an analysis plan for and analyze data from a publicly available global nutrition data set; 5) analyze evaluation research results published in a peer-reviewed document through the critical application of evidence-based evaluation principles; 6) communicate project narratives and research findings clearly, concisely and confidently in oral presentations to a group of peers in a professional setting; 7) lead and collaborate effectively as a member of a multidisciplinary team; 8) communicate in a professional manner with a "client" organization and identify how evaluation data would serve their needs; 9) conduct key informant interviews with stakeholders from a "client" organization; 10) engage in respectful classroom and online discussions with peers using scientific evidence to communicate and support diverse viewpoints.
  • Competencies: Upon completion of this course, students will have acquired experience in the following competencies: 1) understand key concepts and programs across the landscape of current global nutrition issues and interventions (aligned with Certificate in Global Health: Competency #1); 2) develop an appropriate global nutrition intervention and a plan for the monitoring and evaluation of the intervention (aligned with Certificate in Global Health: Competency #5); 3) apply epidemiological principles to the analysis of a quantitative data set in the public domain (aligned with Certificate in Global Health: Competency #3); 4) analyze and critically evaluate research results for making evidence-based policy recommendations; 5) communicate clearly and effectively in a professional setting of peers; 6) engage in respectful dialogue and collaborative teamwork with those of differing viewpoints and backgrounds.

NUTR637 Medical Nutrition Therapy II

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Han-Markey, Theresa
  • Prerequisites: EHS 636
  • Description: Applies nutrition support principles to various clinical disease states. Covers topics such as regulation of fluid and electrolytes in nutrition support, acid-base balance, and other aspects of parenteral nutrition. In addition, the pathophysiology and medical nutrition therapy for diabetes, renal and liver disease is taught.

NUTR646 Approaches in Nutrition Counseling

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Sonneville, Kendrin
  • Prerequisites: NUTR 636: Medical Nutrition Therapy I
  • Description: The aim of this course is to familiarize dietetics students with counseling strategies that can be used for nutrition behavior change. The course will emphasize both the art and the science of nutrition counseling, as well as the practical aspects of implementing counseling for dietary change.

NUTR650 Socio-ecological Approaches to Child and Adolescent Nutrition

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Bauer, Kate
  • Prerequisites: graduate student status,graduate student status
  • Description: This course utilizes a socio-ecological approach to provide a comprehensive introduction to issues and current debates related to public health nutrition among children and adolescents. Throughout the semester, woven through all of these topics, there will be extensive consideration of appropriate research methodologies and critical reading of current scientific literature.
  • Syllabus for NUTR650

NUTR651 Physical Activity and Nutrition

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Mancuso, Peter
  • Prerequisites: NUTR 630 KINES 540,,NUTR 630 KINES 540,NUTR 630 KINES 540,,NUTR 630 KINES 540
  • Description: Students will learn about the impact of physical activity on the nutrition requirements in active individuals and special populations with chronic disease. Students will also learn how to use exercise and diet modification for weight loss and maintenance through lectures and hands on activities.
  • Course Goals: 1) To understand nutrition, fluid and electrolyte requirements in sport, exercise and recovery; 2) To describe safety considerations for exercise in untrained, aged, and chronically ill; 3) To develop exercise prescriptions and understand the unique nutrition requirements for individuals with chronic illness; and 4) Use body composition data to design nutrition plans and prescribe exercise for weight loss and maintenance
  • Competencies: Students who have completed this course will be able to: 1) Describe the macro-and micro-nutrient and fluid and electrolyte requirements for exercise and recovery; 2)Develop safety guidelines for exercise in the untrained, aged, and chronically ill; 3)Develop meal plans that meet the nutritional requirements for individuals who are healthy and clinical populations with chronic disease engaged in exercise programs;4) Develop exercise prescriptions for special clinical populations with chronic illness; and 5) Interpret body composition data in order to develop meal plans and prescribe exercise for weight loss and maintenance
  • This course is cross-listed with KINES 543 in the Kinesiology department.

NUTR657 Nutrition, the Environment, and Cancer

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Zick, Suzanna; Colacino, Justin;
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 502 or 522 or equivalent; EPID 503 or equivalent; and PHYSIO 502 or equivalent
  • Description: A large amount of research indicates that dietary and environmental factors impact the development and recurrence of various types of cancer. This course will survey both classic and emerging literature relevant to this topic in a structured discussion and journal club format.
  • Course Goals: The course will provide students with an opportunity to critically examine and discuss methodological issues around study design and analysis, to understand key concepts of, and to explore the biological mechanisms underlying the associations between diet, the environment, and cancer.,The course will provide students with an opportunity to critically examine and discuss methodological issues around study design and analysis, to understand key concepts of, and to explore the biological mechanisms underlying the associations between diet, the environment, and cancer.
  • Competencies: 1.) Identify sources of bias in nutrition and cancer research and anticipate their potential effects on estimates of association 2.) Weight evidence of the relationship between diet and cancer according to the relative methodological strength of scientific reports 3.) Understand the effects of timing, frequency, duration, and magnitude of exposure to nutrients and environmental exposures on the development of cancer. 4.) Link indicators used in epidemiological and clinical studies with the underlying biological processes they intend to measure. 5.) Integrate evidence from different sources into conceptual frames on nutrition, the environment, and cancer topics. 6.) Understand different strategies for analysis of epidemiological and clinical data in nutrition, the environment, and cancer research. 7.) Envision potential "next steps" to follow (what should be the next study) to build a complete conceptual frame on given cancer and nutrition or cancer and the environment topics.,1.) Identify sources of bias in nutrition and cancer research and anticipate their potential effects on estimates of association 2.) Weight evidence of the relationship between diet and cancer according to the relative methodological strength of scientific reports 3.) Understand the effects of timing, frequency, duration, and magnitude of exposure to nutrients and environmental exposures on the development of cancer. 4.) Link indicators used in epidemiological and clinical studies with the underlying biological processes they intend to measure. 5.) Integrate evidence from different sources into conceptual frames on nutrition, the environment, and cancer topics. 6.) Understand different strategies for analysis of epidemiological and clinical data in nutrition, the environment, and cancer research. 7.) Envision potential "next steps" to follow (what should be the next study) to build a complete conceptual frame on given cancer and nutrition or cancer and the environment topics.

NUTR677 Physical Growth and Maturation

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Peterson, Karen
  • Prerequisites: BIOSTAT 501 or 521
  • Description: This course provides a comprehensive overview of the principles and methods to assess human physical growth and maturational tempo from conception through adolescence and among women of reproductive age. The selection, measurement, and interpretation of anthropometric indicators of growth and maturational tempo are discussed in detail. Public health applications are considered, including the use and limitations of reference growth curves; population trends in obesity, maturation, and stature; growth monitoring in the U.S. and in international public health settings and environmental influences on physical growth and maturation. Students will gain technical expertise in basic analysis and interpretation of growth data from population studies.

NUTR688 Research Topics in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Seo, Young-Ah
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: This course will introduce students to current topics in nutrition research. Students will attend seminars focused on research that will demonstrate the impact of nutrition on human health. Students are encouraged to pose questions to the speaker and write 5-7 bullet points that provide a summary of each presentation.

NUTR697 Readings in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-3 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Supervised study/review of a selected topic in nutritional sciences. May be elected more than once for a maximum of six credits.

NUTR698 Research in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: None
  • Description: Original research investigation of a special topic in nutritional sciences.

NUTR699 Masters Thesis in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter term(s)
  • 1 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Perm of Thesis Advisor
  • Description: This course shall be elected by students enrolled in Master's degree programs that require a formal written thesis as a condition of program completion. The thesis shall be defended in front of the student's thesis committee. The course grade will reflect the student's accomplishments relative to the thesis and its defense. The course is to be elected only once.

NUTR796 Special Topics in Nutritional Sciences

NUTR802 Professional Development and Technical Writing

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Sonneville, Kendrin
  • Prerequisites: EHS801
  • Description: Doctoral students must learn to think critically about their own writing, the writing of their peers, and the process of writing in general. This course will center on peer review, written critiques, and lectures from experts to build the skills necessary to craft a piece of writing with these elements.
  • Course Goals: At the end of the course, students should be able to: -Communicate public health research and its implications to a technical audience in a style that engages and connects with the reader. -Develop translatable writing skills for diverse career paths in science.
  • Competencies: Students taking this class are expected on its completion to: -Have a stronger grasp of the basic skills necessary for writing a scientific manuscript. -Understand the structure and expected content in scientific writing, including abstracts, reviews, and articles. -Understand how to critique the writing style, content, organization, and logic in their own and their peers' writing. -Take and give criticism constructively and use it to improve their writing. -Have a polished piece of writing that they can either submit for publication or use for their preliminary exam. -Have developed a regular writing routine that is productive for them.

NUTR803 Effective Teaching in Public Health

  • Graduate Level
  • Winter term(s)
  • 2 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Anderson, Olivia
  • Description: Students will engage in a community of graduate students to explore/prepare for a faculty career, focusing on teaching at a university-level specifically in the public health field. Students will immerse in literature, discussion, and workshops on state-of-the-art pedagogical techniques. Course tangibles include: teaching philosophy statement, course syllabus, and teaching demonstration.
  • Course Goals: 1. Reflect on your own teaching practice; 2. Engage in conversations about teaching and faculty life with faculty and peers; 3. Design a specific course under your nutrition expertise that you could teach at a university institution; 4. Apply research-based inclusive teaching strategies to your teaching-related documents - a teaching philosophy, syllabus, lecture material; 5. Understand the purpose of different types of student learning assessment and apply them to your newly designed course; 6. Identify strategies for success in higher education for your diverse student body
  • Competencies: 1. Articulate your knowledge of effective pedagogical techniques to colleagues and future employers, both in writing and in discussion 2. Exhibit your teaching values and beliefs through course documents (e.g, syllabus, assignments, etc.) 3. Demonstrate your teaching strategies, values, and beliefs through actively practicing teaching 4. Demonstrate your ability incorporate inclusivity in the classroom setting 5. Establish the ability to actively seek feedback to meet and exceed teaching expectations at an institute of higher education
  • This course is cross-listed with PUBHLTH803.

NUTR899 Advanced Research in Nutritional Sciences

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer term(s)
  • 1-6 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Must be a PhD student in Nutritional Sciences
  • Description: Original investigations of a specific research topic in Nutritional Sciences. Designed for doctoral students performing research prior to passing their qualifying exams. Students will complete two separate rotations with faculty members for a minimum of 1 credit each. This course may be elected more than once.
  • Course Goals: Expose PhD students to Nutritional Sciences research opportunities in order to assist students in exploring interest areas and a dissertation topic.
  • Competencies: To be determined with the faculty member and the student based upon the research rotation.

NUTR990 Dissertation Research/Pre-Candidate

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Nutritional Sciences Doctoral Student
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to status as a candidate.

NUTR995 Dissertation Research for Doctorate in Philosophy

  • Graduate Level
  • Fall, Winter, Spring-Summer term(s)
  • 1-8 Credit Hour(s)
  • Instructor(s): Staff
  • Prerequisites: Nutritional Sciences Doctoral Student
  • Description: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student who has been admitted to status as a candidate