Faculty Profile

J. Tim  Dvonch, PhD

J. Tim Dvonch, PhD

  • Associate Professor, Environmental Health Sciences
  • Associate Chair, Strategic Initiatives, Environmental Health Sciences
  • 6627 SPH Tower
  • 1415 Washington Heights
  • Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2029

Dr. Tim Dvonch is Associate Professor of Environmental Health Sciences at the University of Michigan School of Public Health.  He holds a B.S. in Chemistry, as well as M.S. and PhD degrees in Environmental Health Sciences from the University of Michigan, where he also completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Environmental Science, Engineering, and Technology.  Dr. Dvonch’s research includes exposure assessment and health effects of air pollution, with a focus on chemical composition of particulates and source identification, as well as atmospheric transport and fate of toxicants including mercury and other metals across a wide array of environmental systems with the ultimate goal of informing policy and decision-marking processes.

  • PhD, Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan, 1998
  • M.S., Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan, 1994
  • B.S., Chemistry, University of Michigan, 1992

  • Dr. Dvonch's research interests and experience broadly reside in the exposure assessment, source identification, and health effects of air pollutants. For exposure assessment, his specific interests are in the laboratory development and 'real-world' field-evaluation of methodologies and techniques for improved exposure assessment to air pollutants. These primarily include the mass, number, and chemical composition of ambient particles for exposure assessment at the community, micro-environmental, and personal level. His interests in the application of these methods include source identification and apportionment of the pollutants through the use of receptor models. Further, Dr. Dvonch collaborates on several studies looking at the health effects of well-characterized exposures, both through controlled pollutant exposure studies (animals and humans) as well as population-based epidemiological investigations, using biological risk markers and outcomes including but not limited to respiratory and cardiovascular disease.
  • Air Pollutant Exposure Assessment and Source Identification

    Investigation of the mass, number and chemical composition of ambient particles for exposure assessment at the community, micro-environmental and personal level.  Subsequent application of these data and methods for source identification and apportionment of the pollutants through the use of receptor models.

  • Health Effects of Exposure to Air Pollutants

    Investigations of the health effects of well-characterized exposures, both through controlled pollutant exposure studies (animals and humans) as well as population-based epidemiological investigations, using biological risk markers and outcomes including but not limited to respiratory and cardiovascular disease.

  • Atmospheric Sources, Transport, and Fate of Mercury in the Environment

    Studies investigating the emission sources of mercury to the atmosphere, as well as the subsequent atmospheric transport and deposition to sensitive ecosystems, with particular attention to measurement methods development specific to mercury.

  • Hall, N.L., J.T. Dvonch, F.J. Marsik, J.A. Barres and M.S. Landis (2017).  An artificial turf-based surrogate surface collector for the direct measurement of atmospheric mercury dry deposition.  Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health, 14:173-85.
  • Zhou, H., C. Zhou, M.M. Lynam, J.T. Dvonch, J.A. Barres, P.K. Hopke, M. Cohen and T.M. Holsen (2017).  Atmospheric mercury temporal trends in the northeastern United States from 1992 to 2014:  Are measured concentrations responding to decreasing regional emissions?  Environ. Sci. Technol. Letter., 4:91-97.
  • Lynam M.M., J.T. Dvonch, J.A. Barres, M., Morishita, A. Legg and K. Percy (2015). Oil sands development and its impact on atmospheric wet deposition of air pollutants to the Athabasca Oil Sands Region, Alberta, Canada. Environ. Pollut., 206:469-78.
  • Nkhama E., M. Ndhlovu, J.T. Dvonch, S. Siziya and K. Voyi (2015). Prevalence and determinants of mucous membrane irritations in a community near a cement factory in Zambia: a cross sectional study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health, 12:871-87.
  • Schulz, A.J., G. Mentz, N.R. Sampson, J.T. Dvonch, A. Reyes and B. Izumi (2015). Effects of particulate matter and dietary antioxidant intake on blood pressure. American Journal of Public Health, 105(6):1254-61 [doi:10.2105/AJPH.2014.302176].
  • Sherman, L.S., J.D. Blum, J.T. Dvonch, L.E. Gratz and M.S. Landis (2015). The use of Pb, Sr, and Hg isotopes in Great Lakes precipitation as a tool for pollution source attribution. Science of the Total Environment, 502:362-74 [doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2014.09.034].
  • Hicken, M.T, J.T. Dvonch, A.J. Schulz, G. Mentz and P. Max (2014). Fine particulate matter air pollution and blood pressure: The modifying role of psychosocial stress. Environmental Research, 133:195-203.
  • White-Newsome, J.L, S.J. Brines, D.G. Brown, J.T. Dvonch, C.J. Gronlund, K. Zhang, E.M. Oswald and M.S. O'Neill (2013). Validating satellite-derived land surface temperature with in-situ measurements: A public health perspective. Environmental Health Perspective, 121(8):925-31.
  • Pancras, J.P., M.S. Landis, G.A. Norris, R. Vedantham and J.T. Dvonch (2013). Source apportionment of ambient fine particulate matter in Detroit, Michigan, using hourly resolved PM chemical composition data. Science of the Total Environment, 448:2-13.
  • Lewis, T.C., T.G. Robins, G.B. Mentz, X. Zhang, B. Mukherjee, X. Lin, G.J. Keeler, J.T. Dvonch, F.Y. Yip, M.S. O'Neill, E.A. Parker, B.A. Israel, P.T. Max, and A. Reyes (2013). Air pollution and respiratory symptoms among children with asthma: Vulnerability by measures of asthma severity and residence area. Science of the Total Environment, 448:48-55.