Faculty Profile

Jon  Zelner, PhD

Jon Zelner, PhD

Assistant Professor, Epidemiology
  • 2667 SPH Tower
  • 1415 Washington Heights
  • Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2029

Prior to returning to U-M, Jon completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the Dept. of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases at the Yale School of Public Health (2016), was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health and Society Scholar at Columbia University (2014-16), and was an NIH Research and Policy for Infection Disease Dynamics (RAPIDD) postdoctoral fellow in the Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Princeton University (2011-2014).

PhD, Sociology and Public Policy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 2011

MSW, Social Work, (concentration in health) Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, 2005

BA, Sociology, Haverford College, Haverford, PA, 2003

Jon Zelner is a social epidemiologist focused on understanding and targeting the joint social and biological drivers of infectious disease risk. His work blends theory and methods from sociology and epidemiology, with an emphasis on the development and use of novel computational and statistical methods for integrating social and biological data.

Recent projects include: 1) Modeling racial disparities in Tuberculosis mortality in the early 20th century United States, 2) Modeling the joint contributions of household and community exposure to tuberculosis infection risk in Lima, Peru. 3) Understanding weather and climate factors driving spatial variability in pediatric diarrheal disease risk in Vietnam, 4) Modeling spatial and genetic ‘hotspots’ of multi-drug resistant Tuberculosis risk in Lima, Peru.

Zelner JL, Murray MB, Becerra MC, Galea J, Lecca L, Calderon R, Yataco R, Zhang Z, Manjourides J, Grenfell BT, Cohen T.  (2016). Linking spatial and molecular genetic data to identify hotspots of transmitted multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: a prospective cohort study. Journal of Infectious Diseases. 213(2):287-294.

Morris SE*, Zelner JL*, Fauquier DA, Rowles TK, Rose PE, Gulland F, Grenfell BT. (2015). Partially observed epidemics in wildlife hosts: modelling an outbreak of dolphin morbillivirus in the northwestern Atlantic, June 2013–2014. Journal of the Royal Society Interface. 12(112). (*Authors contributed equally.)

Thompson C*, Zelner JL* Hoang Nhu TD, Phan MV Le Phuc H, Hung NT, Duong VT, Ngoc NM, Tuan HM Tu VHT, Vi LL, Chau NVV, Hien TT, von Clemm E, Storch H, Thwaites G, Grenfell BT, Baker S. (2015). Modeling the impact of environmental and climatic variation on the spatiotemporal trends of hospitalized pediatric diarrhea in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Health and Place. 35:147-154. (*Authors contributed equally.)

Zelner JL, Murray MB, Becerra MC, Galea J, Lecca L, Calderon R, Yataco R, Zhang Z, Grenfell BT, Cohen T. (2014). Age-specific risks of tuberculosis infection from household- and community-exposures suggest opportunities for interventions in a high-burden setting. American Journal of Epidemiology. 180(8):853-861.

Zelner JL, Murray MB, Becerra MC, Galea J, Lecca L, Calderon R, Yataco R, Zhang Z, Grenfell BT, Cohen T. (2014). Protective effects of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination and isoniazid preventive therapy among the household contacts of diagnosed tuberculosis cases: A cohort study. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 189(7):853-859.