Climate Change and Health – What the Science Says and What We Can Do
Palmer Commons (Forum Hall)
Palmer Commons (Forum Hall)

Keynote panel discussion will be live streamed (details forthcoming) with 3 concurrent break-out sessions to discuss solutions and next steps. A reception concludes the event. Summary: our climate is our planet’s life support system. Climate change influences that system and thus human health and disease in numerous ways including impacts from increased extreme weather events, wildfire, decreased air quality, and illnesses transmitted by food, water, and diseases carriers such as mosquitoes and ticks. As described in the National Climate Assessment, some existing health threats will intensify and new health threats will emerge. Not everyone is equally at risk. Important considerations include age, economic resources, and location. Preventive and adaptive actions are needed. Our panel of experts authored the National Climate Assessment Health chapters or are leaders on environmental sustainability. *Registration details forthcoming.

UM Center on Lifestage Environmental Exposures & Disease (M-LEEaD), UM School of Environment & Sustainability, UM SPH Dept of Environmental Health Sciences

Climate Change and Health – What the Science Says and What We Can Do

Summit keynote panel with John Balbus (NIEHS), Kim Knowlton (Columbia) & UM SPH Dean Bowman

February 26, 2019
3:30 pm - 6:00 pm
Palmer Commons (Forum Hall)
Sponsored by: UM Center on Lifestage Environmental Exposures & Disease (M-LEEaD), UM School of Environment & Sustainability, UM SPH Dept of Environmental Health Sciences
Contact Information: Meredith McGehee (mcgehee@umich.edu | 647-0819)
Cost: Free (but registration is required)

More Information & Registration

Keynote panel discussion will be live streamed (details forthcoming) with 3 concurrent break-out sessions to discuss solutions and next steps. A reception concludes the event. Summary: our climate is our planet’s life support system. Climate change influences that system and thus human health and disease in numerous ways including impacts from increased extreme weather events, wildfire, decreased air quality, and illnesses transmitted by food, water, and diseases carriers such as mosquitoes and ticks. As described in the National Climate Assessment, some existing health threats will intensify and new health threats will emerge. Not everyone is equally at risk. Important considerations include age, economic resources, and location. Preventive and adaptive actions are needed. Our panel of experts authored the National Climate Assessment Health chapters or are leaders on environmental sustainability. *Registration details forthcoming.

Event Flyer for Climate Change and Health – What the Science Says and What We Can Do