New Methods Mini-Talks: The Use of Satellite Imagery to Assess the Patterns and Effects of Urban Decline

Ann Arbor MI 03-14-2019 03-14-2019 Though empty lots and abandoned homes make it easy to observe Detroit's urban decline in person, frequent, consistent, high quality data that can empirically capture patterns of decline over time are relatively rare. Many surveys offer too little coverage to allow conclusions at the neighborhood level, while surveys with larger sample sizes - like the census - are too infrequent to capture the mico-processes of change. This event will feature two mini-talks, by Arthur Endsley (PhD Candidate, School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Michigan) and Daniel Katz (Postdoctoral Fellow, School of Public Health, University of Michigan), that highlight the potential of rich, recurrent satellite data to measure the patterns and effects of Detroit's decline. In his work, Endsley uses satellite images to examine how changes in neighborhood social conditions are reflected in changes in urban vegetation. Similarly, Katz's work uses satellite data to consider how demolition and the proliferation of vacant lots in Detroit may lead to especially high pollen production in certain neighborhoods, potentially contributing to the city's disproportionately high asthma and allergy rates.

The Detroit School Series seeks to stimulate an interdisciplinary conversation on how research on Detroit—a city often seen as an extreme outlier of decline—can produce knowledge that is original and

March 14, 2019
3:15 pm - 5:00 pm
Room 4 (1st Floor) in the Michigan League (Ann Arbor Central Campus)
Contact Information: detroitschool@umich.edu

Though empty lots and abandoned homes make it easy to observe Detroit's urban decline in person, frequent, consistent, high quality data that can empirically capture patterns of decline over time are relatively rare. Many surveys offer too little coverage to allow conclusions at the neighborhood level, while surveys with larger sample sizes - like the census - are too infrequent to capture the mico-processes of change. This event will feature two mini-talks, by Arthur Endsley (PhD Candidate, School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Michigan) and Daniel Katz (Postdoctoral Fellow, School of Public Health, University of Michigan), that highlight the potential of rich, recurrent satellite data to measure the patterns and effects of Detroit's decline. In his work, Endsley uses satellite images to examine how changes in neighborhood social conditions are reflected in changes in urban vegetation. Similarly, Katz's work uses satellite data to consider how demolition and the proliferation of vacant lots in Detroit may lead to especially high pollen production in certain neighborhoods, potentially contributing to the city's disproportionately high asthma and allergy rates.