Precision Health Sept. Seminar: Mobile Technology for Precision Mental Health Care

Ann Arbor MI 09-25-2019 09-25-2019

Depression, sleep concerns, addiction, and anxiety are leading and growing causes of disability, productivity loss, and premature mortality globally. The number of behavioral health clinicians available to provide face-to-face, traditional care is woefully inadequate to meet the growing need. Further, a substantial proportion of patients who receive traditional care do not get better. With inadequate evidence to meaningfully guide treatment decisions and few available objective measures of mental health symptoms, choice of treatment is often based on clinician preference and simple heuristics. More than any other advance that has emerged in the past four decades, mobile technology has the potential to address the dual problems of limited clinical capacity and inadequate and untimely data. As part of Precision Health at the University of Michigan, the PROviding Mental health Precision Treatment (PROMPT) Precision Health Study will test wearable and mobile technology as a means to reduce mental health symptoms among patients waiting for mental health care. Furthermore, data derived from mobile technology, genomics, and patient report will be used to predict response to clinic-based treatments.

Presented by Amy Bohnert, PhD, MHS, Associate Professor, Psychiatry; Corey Lester, MS, PhD, PharmD, Research Assistant Professor, Pharmacy; Srijan Sen, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, Psychiatry

September 25, 2019
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
University Hospital, 2nd Floor, Ford Auditorium, 1500 E Medical Center Dr
Sponsored by: Precision Health
Contact Information: Tina Creguer, 734-615-2024 or tcreguer@umich.edu

More Information & Registration

Depression, sleep concerns, addiction, and anxiety are leading and growing causes of disability, productivity loss, and premature mortality globally. The number of behavioral health clinicians available to provide face-to-face, traditional care is woefully inadequate to meet the growing need. Further, a substantial proportion of patients who receive traditional care do not get better. With inadequate evidence to meaningfully guide treatment decisions and few available objective measures of mental health symptoms, choice of treatment is often based on clinician preference and simple heuristics. More than any other advance that has emerged in the past four decades, mobile technology has the potential to address the dual problems of limited clinical capacity and inadequate and untimely data. As part of Precision Health at the University of Michigan, the PROviding Mental health Precision Treatment (PROMPT) Precision Health Study will test wearable and mobile technology as a means to reduce mental health symptoms among patients waiting for mental health care. Furthermore, data derived from mobile technology, genomics, and patient report will be used to predict response to clinic-based treatments.