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Measuring the effects of vaccines in randomized and observational contexts: challenges and ways forward

Ann Arbor MI 10-17-2019 10-17-2019

Marc Lipsitch is Professor of Epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Director of the Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics (CCDD). He is an author of more than 300 peer-reviewed publications on the impact of medical and public health interventions on the spread and evolution of infectious disease agents, and the consequences of these changes for human health. He has played a leading role in epidemiologic responses to infectious disease outbreaks, from SARS to pandemic influenza and Ebola. Ongoing studies of pandemic preparedness and response focus on preparedness for clinical trials in outbreaks. In addition, current research includes the application of population genomics to understand the spread of infections and the changes produced in bacterial population by human immunity, and modeling the effects of pneumococcal vaccination. He has contributed to our understanding of influenza seasonality, disease burden estimation, epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance, and novel methods for infectious disease epidemiology and modeling. Experimentally, his laboratory studies the immunity and antimicrobial resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae, combining molecular biology and animal studies with population genomics, epidemiology and mathematical modeling. Dr. Lipsitch is a member of the American Academy of Microbiology and has served on the editorial advisory boards/associate editor of eLife, PLoS Medicine, the Journal of Infectious Diseases, American Journal of Epidemiology, Epidemiology, and Epidemics. He was a member of the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology Working Group on H1N1 Influenza, as well as CDC’s Team B for the 2009 H1N1 pandemic and the Wellcome Trust/CIDRAP Team B for Ebola. He has provided advice on antimicrobial resistance, SARS or influenza to the Food and Drug Administration, World Health Organization, Centers for Disease Control, Congressional Budget Office, Defense Science Board, and the governmen

Epidemiology Seminar Series with Marc Lipsitch

icon to add this event to your google calendarOctober 17, 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
3755 SPH I
1415 Washington Heights
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029

Sponsored by: Epidemiology
Contact Information: Stacy Babcock (734) 764-5435

Marc Lipsitch is Professor of Epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Director of the Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics (CCDD). He is an author of more than 300 peer-reviewed publications on the impact of medical and public health interventions on the spread and evolution of infectious disease agents, and the consequences of these changes for human health. He has played a leading role in epidemiologic responses to infectious disease outbreaks, from SARS to pandemic influenza and Ebola. Ongoing studies of pandemic preparedness and response focus on preparedness for clinical trials in outbreaks. In addition, current research includes the application of population genomics to understand the spread of infections and the changes produced in bacterial population by human immunity, and modeling the effects of pneumococcal vaccination. He has contributed to our understanding of influenza seasonality, disease burden estimation, epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance, and novel methods for infectious disease epidemiology and modeling. Experimentally, his laboratory studies the immunity and antimicrobial resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae, combining molecular biology and animal studies with population genomics, epidemiology and mathematical modeling. Dr. Lipsitch is a member of the American Academy of Microbiology and has served on the editorial advisory boards/associate editor of eLife, PLoS Medicine, the Journal of Infectious Diseases, American Journal of Epidemiology, Epidemiology, and Epidemics. He was a member of the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology Working Group on H1N1 Influenza, as well as CDC’s Team B for the 2009 H1N1 pandemic and the Wellcome Trust/CIDRAP Team B for Ebola. He has provided advice on antimicrobial resistance, SARS or influenza to the Food and Drug Administration, World Health Organization, Centers for Disease Control, Congressional Budget Office, Defense Science Board, and the governmen

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