A health policy hurricane: Promoting health in a changing climate

Ann Arbor MI 10-17-2019 10-17-2019 The California Wildfires of 2018 and Hurricanes Irma, Harvey and Maria in 2017 pushed the US’s disaster response system to its limit. My work uses novel methods and sources of data to understand how disasters affect health beyond the immediate after-effects of a disaster, with the aim of healthy and resilient communities. Reception and networking to immediately follow the presentation. Dr. Sue Anne Bell is a nurse scientist and family nurse practitioner, with expertise in disaster preparedness and response, community health and emergency care. Her research, supported by an NIH K23 award, focuses on the health effects of disasters and the impact of climate change on human health within a health equity framework. She is particularly interested in the long-term impact of disasters and aging, in developing policy that protects and promotes health throughout the disaster management cycle, and in the relationship between community resilience, health disparities and disasters. She is active in multiple emergency preparedness and response activities, including serving on the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s National Advisory Council, and on the National Academy of Science and Medicine’s Committee on Best Practices to Assess Morbidity and Mortality after Large Scale Disasters. She is clinically active in disaster response through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service’s National Disaster Medical System with recent deployments to Hurricane Irma, Hurricane Maria and the California wildfires. The IHPI Research Seminar Series is a lecture-based program designed to share innovative health services research topics, studies, and programs, with clinicians, faculty, research staff, and students from a variety of disciplines.

IHPI Seminar Series

October 17, 2019
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
NCRC B10 Research Auditorium
Sponsored by: Institute for Healthcare Policy & Innovation
Contact Information: strosell@umich.edu

More Information

The California Wildfires of 2018 and Hurricanes Irma, Harvey and Maria in 2017 pushed the US’s disaster response system to its limit. My work uses novel methods and sources of data to understand how disasters affect health beyond the immediate after-effects of a disaster, with the aim of healthy and resilient communities. Reception and networking to immediately follow the presentation. Dr. Sue Anne Bell is a nurse scientist and family nurse practitioner, with expertise in disaster preparedness and response, community health and emergency care. Her research, supported by an NIH K23 award, focuses on the health effects of disasters and the impact of climate change on human health within a health equity framework. She is particularly interested in the long-term impact of disasters and aging, in developing policy that protects and promotes health throughout the disaster management cycle, and in the relationship between community resilience, health disparities and disasters. She is active in multiple emergency preparedness and response activities, including serving on the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s National Advisory Council, and on the National Academy of Science and Medicine’s Committee on Best Practices to Assess Morbidity and Mortality after Large Scale Disasters. She is clinically active in disaster response through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service’s National Disaster Medical System with recent deployments to Hurricane Irma, Hurricane Maria and the California wildfires. The IHPI Research Seminar Series is a lecture-based program designed to share innovative health services research topics, studies, and programs, with clinicians, faculty, research staff, and students from a variety of disciplines.