Webinar: Implications of human microbiome research for epidemiology and public health
Online
Online
Applications of high throughput ‘omics technologies to the microbes living in and on humans (the microbiota) are rapidly changing our perspectives of the importance of microbiota to human health. If microbiota enhance or reduce the effects of pathogens, drugs or other exposures on the host, we might manipulate the microbiota for our benefit. Alternatively, or in addition, microbiota might respond to exposure-induced changes in host functions, and thus microbiota characteristics could be used as a diagnostic or prognostic tool. I will provide examples of ongoing epidemiologic studies of the human microbiome, and comment on the promise and challenges of the microbiome for Epidemiology and Public Health. M-LEEaD Omics and Bioinformatics Core

Webinar: Implications of human microbiome research for epidemiology and public health

Betsy Foxman, PhD - Professor of Epidemiology, Director of the Center for Molecular and Clinical Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases, University of Michigan School of Public Health.

June 30, 2020
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Online
Sponsored by: M-LEEaD Omics and Bioinformatics Core
Contact Information: Katie Zarins (kmrents@umich.edu)

More Information & Registration

Applications of high throughput ‘omics technologies to the microbes living in and on humans (the microbiota) are rapidly changing our perspectives of the importance of microbiota to human health. If microbiota enhance or reduce the effects of pathogens, drugs or other exposures on the host, we might manipulate the microbiota for our benefit. Alternatively, or in addition, microbiota might respond to exposure-induced changes in host functions, and thus microbiota characteristics could be used as a diagnostic or prognostic tool. I will provide examples of ongoing epidemiologic studies of the human microbiome, and comment on the promise and challenges of the microbiome for Epidemiology and Public Health.