A Conversation With Dr. William G. Anderson
Med Sci 2 North Lecture Hall
Med Sci 2 North Lecture Hall

Please join us to hear Dr. William Anderson discuss the challenges he surmounted prior to and after becoming a physician. Born in 1927 as the grandson of slaves, he served in the US Navy during World War II. After obtaining an undergraduate degree from Alabama State University, he graduated from Des Moines University College of Osteopathic Medicine in 1949. After completing his residency in Flint Michigan, he was initially prevented from treating patients due to segregationist policies. He became a leader in the civil rights movement, taking part in hundreds of civil rights marches and was imprisoned. He was a friend and physician to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Jackie Robinson, and Rosa Parks. He supported protesters from the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee which staged sit-ins at establishments across the south. He continues to teach at Michigan State University’s College of Osteopathic Medicine.

No need to bring a chair or blanket; seating is available in the lecture hall

UMMS Paths of Excellence and Office of Medical School Education

A Conversation With Dr. William G. Anderson

Physician to Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks & Jackie Robinson

icon to add this event to your google calendarSeptember 23, 2021
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Med Sci 2 North Lecture Hall
Sponsored by: UMMS Paths of Excellence and Office of Medical School Education
Contact Information: Lisa Schneider lisaschn@umich.edu

More Information & Registration

Please join us to hear Dr. William Anderson discuss the challenges he surmounted prior to and after becoming a physician. Born in 1927 as the grandson of slaves, he served in the US Navy during World War II. After obtaining an undergraduate degree from Alabama State University, he graduated from Des Moines University College of Osteopathic Medicine in 1949. After completing his residency in Flint Michigan, he was initially prevented from treating patients due to segregationist policies. He became a leader in the civil rights movement, taking part in hundreds of civil rights marches and was imprisoned. He was a friend and physician to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Jackie Robinson, and Rosa Parks. He supported protesters from the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee which staged sit-ins at establishments across the south. He continues to teach at Michigan State University’s College of Osteopathic Medicine.

No need to bring a chair or blanket; seating is available in the lecture hall