Coronavirus

illustration of the COVID-19 coronavirus

COVID-19, Aerosols, and Ventilation

As we continue through these winter months, we find ourselves inside for longer periods of time. How can we avoid aerosolized droplets becoming a problem for disease transmission in our public buildings? We have many layers to consider for minimizing risk, but in many ways it starts with the ventilation systems in these buildings. To learn more about the connection between air ventilation and the COVID-19 pandemic, we spoke with Dr. Aurora Le, assistant professor of Environmental Health Sciences at the School of Public Health and an expert on biocontainment and biosafety procedures. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and many other public health experts, close contact with another person, and specifically through the spread of respiratory droplets is considered the primary cause of infection from COVID-19. However,mounting evidence points to aerosolized droplets—much smaller droplets that remain in the air, sometimes for hours—as a concerning source of transmission for coronavirus, especially in what are known as superspreader events, where many people are infected by just a few or even one known source. Read more

illustration of the COVID-19 coronavirus

What You Should Know about the COVID-19 Vaccine

In this episode infectious disease expert Dr. Arnold Monto discusses the safety and efficacy of the COVID-19 vaccines. Monto is a Professor of Epidemiology and Global Public Health at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. Throughout his seven decade career, Monto has been involved in pandemic planning and emergency response to influenza and other respiratory virus outbreaks, including the 1968 Hong Kong influenza pandemic, Avian Influenza, SARS, MERS and the COVID-19 pandemic. He currently serves as acting chair of the vaccines and related biological products Advisory Committee, which provides advice to the Food and Drug Administration on the authorization and licensure of vaccines to prevent COVID-19. Read more

illustration of the COVID-19 coronavirus

A Personal and Professional Journey to India During the COVID-19 Pandemic

As global coronavirus cases spiked, University of Michigan School of Public Health Biostatistics chair and professor Bhramar Mukherjee traveled to India to continue her critical work on the pandemic and reunite with family. In this episode, Mukherjee joins us from her home in India to discuss the pandemic on the ground there, the differences between pandemic response in India and the United States, and the challenges facing both countries as they begin the distribution of vaccines and look to end the pandemic. Read more

illustration of the COVID-19 coronavirus

An Inside Look at the COVID-19 Vaccine Development and Approval Process

In this episode infectious disease expert Arnold Monto discusses the COVID-19 vaccine development and approval process. Monto is a Professor of Epidemiology and Global Public Health at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. Also in this episode, Dr. Emily Martin, an associate professor of epidemiology at Michigan Public Health, helps guide us through some commonly asked questions about the safety and distribution of the new vaccine. Read more

illustration of the COVID-19 coronavirus

Keeping Kids Active at Home and All Year

In this episode, Rebecca Hasson, assistant professor of Nutritional Sciences at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, talks about programs that help teachers, superintendents, and school boards ensure students are reaching their learning outcomes. And she shares a range of ways for families with children trying to stay active. To find out more about the coronavirus pandemic in Latin America, we spoke to Joe Eisenberg, a professor and the chair of Epidemiology at the University of Michigan School of Public Health and an expert on infectious disease research in the region. He provides insight on current figures and how various national responses have shaped the status of the pandemic in Latin American countries. Read more

illustration of the COVID-19 coronavirus

Debunking Misinformation About COVID-19

We live in a connected time. The information age has brought with it unparalleled access to other people through telecommunications, email, social media, and so on. Someone half a world away can post something on their social platforms, and you could see it almost instantly seen where you are. This access can be an amazing resource. But on the flipside, instant access to people's thoughts and opinions can sometimes skew toward rumor or gossip and upend rigorously researched truths. More than just being a source of confusion, misinformation can cause huge problems. This has been made painfully apparent during the current COVID-19 pandemic. In this episode, we take a look at some of the more popular misconceptions and questions about COVID-19 from a public health standpoint. Read more