Maternal Health: Improving Well-Being for Moms and Babies

illustration of a mother holding her child

Women think about more than just the pain they may experience during childbirth. They think about the many factors—both environmental and social—that can impact health outcomes for themselves and their children. Experts from the University of Michigan School of Public Health and the School of Nursing discuss how these social factors, environmental exposures, and maternal support can contribute to the overall well-being of moms and babies.

Listen to "Maternal Health: Improving Well-Being for Moms and Babies" on Spreaker.

subscribe social icons

Subscribe and listen to Population Healthy on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, iHeartRadio, YouTube, or wherever you listen to podcasts!

Be sure to follow us at @umichsph on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, so you can share your perspectives on the issues we discussed, learn more from Michigan Public Health experts, and share episodes of the podcast with your friends on social media.


In This Episode

Headshot of Lee RooseveltLee Roosevelt

Clinical Assistant Professor of Health Behavior and Biological Sciences at the University of Michigan School of Nursing

 

 

 

Arline GeronimusArline Geronimus

Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education at the University of Michigan School of Public Health

Arline Geronimus’s research interests include structural and cultural influences on population variation in family structure and age-at-first birth; the effects of poverty, institutionalized discrimination, and aspects of residential areas on health; the collective strategies marginalized communities employ to mitigate, resist, or undo the harmful effects of poverty and structural racism on their health; the trade-offs these strategies reflect; and the effects of public policies on these autonomous protections. Learn more.

Headshot of Brittany McQueerBrittany McQueer

Master’s Student in Health Behavior and Health Education at the University of Michigan School of Public Health and practicing doula

 

 


Deborah WatkinsDeborah Watkins

Research Assistant Professor of Environmental Health Sciences at the University of Michigan School of Public Health

Deborah Watkin’s research is focused on investigating causal relationships between exposure to environmental contaminants during critical periods of development and subsequent health effects. Specifically, she is interested in the molecular mechanisms by which exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals may affect hormonally driven developmental processes, such as growth, neurodevelopment, and puberty, with long-term impacts on health. Learn more.

Related Links