Health for Women

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Study Finds Consuming More Fruits and Vegetables Can Improve Sleep

New research from Erica Jansen

A new study published in Sleep Health Journal found increasing consumption of fruit and vegetables improved insomnia-related symptoms in young adults, especially young women. Findings from the research highlight dietary improvement as another therapeutic recommendation for women experiencing insomnia. Read more

Beth Brines uses technology on campus to connect with global partners

Remote Global Health Internship Is Not an Oxymoron

Q&A with Elizabeth Brines

Global internships this summer were rather different from what students might have envisioned. With a creative spirit, adaptable skills, and a passion for moving public health forward, Michigan students spent their summer months connecting with and learning from a variety of global health partners. Read more

Image of a pregnant woman

Coronavirus: What Pregnant Women Should Know

Q&A with Miatta Buxton

Nearly 4 million babies are born each year in the United States. In the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, pregnant women are concerned about their health and the health of their children. University of Michigan maternal and child health expert Miatta Buxton, an assistant research scientist in the Department of Epidemiology at the School of Public Health, discusses the issue. Read more

Woman on bridge in the forest.

PFAS Exposure May Lead to Early Menopause in Women

New research from Ning Ding and Sung Kyun Park

Women exposed to PFAS may experience menopause two years earlier than other women, according to a new University of Michigan School of Public health study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Read more

Nurse practitioner

Advancing Care: Nurse Practitioners, At-Risk Communities, and the Ever-Expanding Education that Puts Nurses at the Heart of Serving Communities in Need

Nurses have been playing a unique and vital role in our battles against disease for centuries. Since the 1960s in the US, nurses have been at the forefront not only of health care services but also of health care administration and management. Nurses continue evolving their skills and the profession itself to meet needs beyond even their own imaginations and comfort levels. Read more