Health Management and Policy

Dr. Julio Frenk, MPH, PhD, President of the University of Miami, Florida

Leadership to Inspire Global Change

Julio Frenk, MPH ’81, PhD ’83

Julio Frenk’s career has oscillated between health care and higher education. He currently serves as President of the University of Miami and for six years served as Mexico’s Secretary of Health. Whether in the academy or in policymaking, the unifying theme to that career, Frenk says, has been trying to give back through service. Read more

Illustration of a policing situation

Systemic Racism, Policing, and Public Health Advocacy

Q&A with Payton Watt and Jamison Koeman

It can take a long time to develop new policy, and some advocacy roads lead to dead ends. But good advocacy work always makes a difference. As racism, policing, and police reform were becoming the national public health story of the summer, student leaders led a remote advocacy initiative to continue bringing public health insights to the discourse. Read more

Black patient checking blood oxygen levels with a pulse oximeter

Black People Are Three Times More Likely to Experience Pulse Oximeter Errors

Susan Dorr Goold, Michael Sjoding, and Thomas Valley

Pulse oximeters can noninvasively measure blood oxygen levels, a vital biomarker for many. But these devices are imperfect and provide inaccurate readings especially for Black patients. Why are these devices flawed, and how can we improve the technology? Read more

Family member caring for a younger child

Will COVID-19 Be a Catalyst for Paid Family Leave Expansion?

Batsheva Honig

Paid family leave is needed now more than ever. The United States is the only developed country without mandated paid family leave policy for all employees, a fact thrown into sharp relief by the coronavirus pandemic. Read more

Adult daughter and father sitting at a restaurant reading paper.

Caring for Our Caregivers: The Unrecognized and Undervalued Family Caregiver

Minakshi Raj, PhD ’20

For years we have known that the US does not have a sufficient health care workforce to provide adequate health care for older adults. The current pandemic makes the situation all the more pressing. Now is the time to revisit and revise our policies and practices to reduce the burden of suffering for older Americans and their caregivers. Read more