Adolescent Health

Childhood photo of the author sitting at table eating a sandwich.

The smallest in the class

Hailey Jurgens

“Growing up, I was always the smallest child in the class. Not only was I short, but I was also thin, sometimes surprisingly so. Doctors were always scaring my parents by telling them that I was falling behind the “normal” growth chart and encouraging them to make me eat more.”

Water trickles out of the end of a rusty pipe

Lead exposure may alter the body's response to stress

Chris Giang and Olivia M. Halabicky, PhD, RN

The water crisis in Flint, Michigan garnered national attention, but there are thousands of cities in the US with even higher levels of lead poisoning. Despite knowing lead is harmful, we still don’t know how lead causes such harmful health outcomes. Identifying potential biological pathways is key for developing interventions to mitigate health risk.

A fieldworker holds a box of freshly harvested strawberries

Pesticide Exposure May Be a Risk Factor for Poor Sleep Health

Astrid Zamora

Nutritional Sciences PhD candidate Astrid Zamora has vivid memories of her Abuela coming home from working in the fields, experiencing intense pain, burning sensations, and trouble breathing. These ailments were the result of long-term exposure to pesticides. Now, an extensive body of research shows that occupational exposure to pesticides is detrimental to human health, including sleep health. Zamora explores two studies she was involved in exploring the links between pesticide exposure and poor sleep health.

A teenager wearing a mask outside

A Teenager's Guide to Coping with the Pandemic

Q&A with Alison Miller

As case numbers continue to drop, it’s important to remember that the pandemic isn’t over yet. With that in mind, how can teenagers—who are highly social and highly conscientious—be positive community leaders in our ongoing efforts to get back to some sense of normal.

A provider goes over a health resource with a patient or parent

Screening for Social Determinants of Health in Pediatric Settings

Phoebe Trout, Rebeccah Sokol, Julia Ammer, Layla S. Mohammed, Rachel Varisco, Sara F. Stein, and Alison L. Miller

Early screening and intervention, including in the doctor’s office, can help address health inequities and mitigate their impact. The negative effects of childhood adversity extend to a variety of health outcomes. Screening promotes well-being by ensuring families have the resources they need to maintain a healthy environment for their child.