Reproductive Health

A black mother stands on a beach while holding her infant

Infant Mortality among Black Babies

Utibe Effiong, MPH ’14, Ekemini Hogan, and Obasi Okorie

It’s a painful statistical fact that Black babies die at higher rates than White babies—a fact all the more painful and tragic for those living with the realities of infant mortality. The difference in death rates is shared by developing and developed nations alike. But the trend can and must change. Read more

Antibiotic pills displayed in a pill bottle

Antibiotic Use during Pregnancy: Too Much of a Good Thing?

Lixin Zhang, PhD ’99

The discovery and use of antibiotics is one of public health’s great achievements, but antibiotic use is not without its problems. At therapeutic doses, antibiotics exert a strong selection pressure on the microbial community. When antibiotics interact with an infant’s developing microbiome, they can affect gut health and with it the child’s health for years to come. Read more

Black Mother holding a newborn baby

State of Maternal Mortality: The Inequitable Burden on Black Mothers

Kyle Simone Nisbeth

In the US, Black women die from pregnancy-related complications at a much higher rate than the rest of the population. The majority of these deaths are preventable, introducing tough questions for health care. Through awareness and advocacy, says Kyle Nisbeth, we can ensure that these burdens are mitigated and that Black mothers and babies receive the care they need to thrive. Read more

Kelly Gonzalez presenting to a group of students.

Healing in Public Health: Oppression, Trauma, and Resilience

An Interview with Kelly Gonzales and Jillene Joseph

Two leaders in Native American communities discuss intergenerational trauma, oppression and dehumanization, decolonization, and how to be agents of healing, hopeful change, and health for all. Read more

Menstrual Products

Changing the Cycle: Period Poverty as a Public Health Crisis

Ashley Rapp and Sidonie Kilpatrick

With 1 in 5 girls missing school due to lack of menstrual products, period poverty is an important, yet often ignored, public health crisis. Michigan Public Health students Ashley Rapp and Sidonie Kilpatrick explore the issue, and the ways public health professionals can work toward menstrual equity. Read more