Biostatistics

Katherine Hoffman at her desk in the biostatistics and epidemiology division at Weill Cornell Medicine.

On the Sidelines: New York's COVID-19 Outbreak from the Eyes of a Biostatistician

Katherine Hoffman, MS ’18

It's March. An early-career biostatistician at a large medical facility, alum Katherine Hoffman is living through New York City’s explosive COVID-19 outbreak. As the statistician for a pulmonary and critical care team, she is quickly pulled into COVID-19 work. Her hospital is running out of ventilators. She is told to drop all other research projects for COVID-19 work. This is her story. Read more

1970 Diag Rally

50 Years Later, the Future Awaits

Dean F. DuBois Bowman and Dean Jonathan Overpeck

Fifty years after a Michigan “teach-in” provided a blueprint and momentum for thousands of other events around the country, we must continue looking forward to new iterations of environmental consciousness and care as we seek to be part of the solutions to global climate change. Read more

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One Family, Three Disciplines: An Intergenerational Conversation on Public Health

Michael Boehnke, Betsy Foxman, and Kevin Foxman Boehnke

We asked a family of public health researchers about big-picture changes in the field, how they decide which questions to pursue, and what they make of specialization in the sciences. Their conversation both lifts up and itself embodies the interdisciplinary nature of public health. Read more

public health data visualization

How Does Public Health Use Big Data?

Part 4 in Our 'What Is Public Health?' Video Series

We live in a world full of data, but how do we use it effectively? In this new installment in our 'What Is Public Health?" video series, see how public health professionals build the tools that help communities, physicians, individuals, and others harness data to improve health everywhere. Read more

biobank

What's a Biobank, and How Can My Health Record Support Research?

Max Salvatore and Lauren Beesley

Advances in genetic science provide us more and more information about our health. Biobanks are increasing the organization of that data so we can ask and answer crucial health questions more rapidly, from diseases we might have to how we might respond to certain drug treatments. Read more