Vaccines

Health care worker taking a patient's blood pressure in a clinic

Should I Take the COVID Vaccine as a Minority?

Anita Pandit, MS ’16

How are managing mental health and receiving a COVID vaccine similar? They both require minorities to have some level of trust in health sciences and the people administering their health care. Alum Anita Pandit walks us through the good and the bad reasons not getting a vaccine—and why she will be getting one. Read more

A doctor consults with mother and children about HIV/AIDS at Pepo La Tumaini Jangwani, HIV/AIDS Community Rehabilitation Program, Orphanage and Clinic. Nairobi, Kenya, Africa

The Future of Universal Health Coverage in Africa

Utibe Effiong, MPH ’14, Fejiro Nwoko, and Uju Okeke

While COVID stretches already stretched health care systems across Africa, the future of Africa’s health care insurance systems is full of opportunity, promising improved coverage and creative care delivery across all sectors of society. Read more

Microscopic image of the poliovirus

What the Polio Epidemic Can Teach Us about Vaccine Hesitancy

Samantha Kasselman, Ryan Olivier, Hadley Wallace, Claire Gleason, and Kerry Lindquist

Well before the COVID-19 pandemic, vaccine hesitancy resulted in lower immunization coverage for many vaccine-preventable diseases. Vaccine hesitancy around one of those diseases—polio—can shed light on the challenges we now face with the COVID-19 vaccine. Read more

Graphic showing Benefit–Risk Analysis of Health Benefits versus Excess Risk of SARS-CoV-2 Infection

Outbreaks Inevitable as Childhood Vaccination Rates Decrease

Sarah Javaid and Giovanna Buttazzoni

COVID-19 poses unique challenges to vaccination programs, with children around the world going unvaccinated for a variety of reasons. To prevent childhood deaths and disease spread due to decreased vaccination coverage, immunization programs must continue during the pandemic. Read more

Public health researcher interviews a municipal health officer in the Philippines

It's Time to Rethink Capacity Building in Global Health Work

K. Rivet Amico

Capacity building is a ubiquitous phrase in grant applications, communications, and guidelines for many global health initiatives. Too often the phrase connotes an assumption that “established” US partners build knowledge or practice in “less-resourced” communities. What language can we use to more honestly recognize the value and contributions of all collaborators? Read more