Innovation

A student uses technology and digital connections to review public health data at the University of Michigan School of Public Health

7 Ways the Pandemic Changed Global Public Health for the Future

Chinyere Neale

The romanticism of global public health work, says Chinyere Neale, will not survive the pandemic nor the new forms of collaboration it has demanded of researchers. Knowing that we can do really good work from anywhere in the world—including our current location—is a good thing for public health.

A doctor consults with mother and children about HIV/AIDS at Pepo La Tumaini Jangwani, HIV/AIDS Community Rehabilitation Program, Orphanage and Clinic. Nairobi, Kenya, Africa

The Future of Universal Health Coverage in Africa

Utibe Effiong, MPH ’14, Fejiro Nwoko, and Uju Okeke

While COVID stretches already stretched health care systems across Africa, the future of Africa’s health care insurance systems is full of opportunity, promising improved coverage and creative care delivery across all sectors of society.

Katherine Hoffman at her desk in the biostatistics and epidemiology division at Weill Cornell Medicine.

On the Sidelines: New York's COVID-19 Outbreak from the Eyes of a Biostatistician

Katherine Hoffman, MS ’18

It's March. An early-career biostatistician at a large medical facility, alum Katherine Hoffman is living through New York City’s explosive COVID-19 outbreak. As the statistician for a pulmonary and critical care team, she is quickly pulled into COVID-19 work. Her hospital is running out of ventilators. She is told to drop all other research projects for COVID-19 work. This is her story.

Mosquito sitting on a leaf

Do Africans Want Genetically Modified Mosquitoes?

Utibe Effiong, MPH ’14

Genetically modifying mosquitoes to control infectious disease is not a new idea. But all consequences—the good and the bad—of such an intervention must be adequately vetted. And importantly, argues physician and alum Utibe Effiong, local communities should have a say in the process.

Presenters and other participants in the University of Michigan’s Conference on Race and the Incidence of Environmental Hazards in front of the Dana Building, 1990.

Grass Roots: The Sustainable Shifts that Lead to Environmental Justice

Todd Ziegler, MS ’15

When civil rights leaders, environmentalists, and researchers converged on the university in 1990 for the Conference on Race and the Incidence of Environmental Hazards, they were part of a much larger movement focusing the nation on environmental justice.

Illustration of people talking

Changing the Narrative around a Changing Climate

Ashley Bieniek-Tobasco, BS ’11, MPH ’13, DrPH

Do fear-inducing representations of climate change actually motivate people to take action? As the influence of popular media grows, communicators across the sciences have an opportunity and a responsibility to shift climate conversations from messages of doom to narratives of hope.