Global Public Health

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Singapore's COVID resurgence highlights need to protect vulnerable populations

Mohamad Ramli

In the fall of 2021, Singapore had one of the highest national vaccination rates around the globe. Despite this success, and vigilant COVID-19-related safety measures, the small nation has continued to struggle under the burden that the pandemic has put on its various care systems. One social worker reflects on the impact experienced by some of the country's vulnerable populations.

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Recognizing Michigan Public Health's Online Learning Community

The University of Michigan School of Public Health proudly celebrates National Distance Learning Week from November 8 - 13, 2021. During National Distance Learning Week we recognize the students, faculty, and staff who make up our online public health community.

A student uses technology and digital connections to review public health data at the University of Michigan School of Public Health

7 Ways the Pandemic Changed Global Public Health for the Future

Chinyere Neale

The romanticism of global public health work, says Chinyere Neale, will not survive the pandemic nor the new forms of collaboration it has demanded of researchers. Knowing that we can do really good work from anywhere in the world—including our current location—is a good thing for public health.

College Street, North Kolkata, India. Photo by Pratiti Ghosh.

Where Science Meets Humanity: A Story of Suffering and Love in India

Mousumi Banerjee

India’s coronavirus problem is everyone’s problem. When a virus ravages one country this badly, it will affect others—and well beyond the spread of a disease. We must and will act on the responsibilities we have as a global community because disease is disease, love is love, and both are highly infectious.

Map of global dots connected by lines

It's Time to Rethink Capacity Building in Global Health Work

K. Rivet Amico

Capacity building is a ubiquitous phrase in grant applications, communications, and guidelines for many global health initiatives. Too often the phrase connotes an assumption that “established” US partners build knowledge or practice in “less-resourced” communities. What language can we use to more honestly recognize the value and contributions of all collaborators?