Health Behavior and Health Education

A teenager wearing a mask outside

A Teenager's Guide to Coping with the Pandemic

Q&A with Alison Miller

As case numbers continue to drop, it’s important to remember that the pandemic isn’t over yet. With that in mind, how can teenagers—who are highly social and highly conscientious—be positive community leaders in our ongoing efforts to get back to some sense of normal. Read more

Map of global dots connected by lines

It's Time to Rethink Capacity Building in Global Health Work

K. Rivet Amico

Capacity building is a ubiquitous phrase in grant applications, communications, and guidelines for many global health initiatives. Too often the phrase connotes an assumption that “established” US partners build knowledge or practice in “less-resourced” communities. What language can we use to more honestly recognize the value and contributions of all collaborators? Read more

Martin Luther King, Jr.

Reflecting on Dr. King's Legacy and the Field of Public Health

Enrique W. Neblett Jr., PhD

To learn more about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s ongoing impact on human health, we asked Enrique Neblett, professor of Health Behavior and Health Education at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, to share how Dr. King’s legacy informs and inspires his own work in the fields of public health and the social sciences. Read more

René Pitter, MPH '09, finishes the Race against Hate

Movements toward Health and Each Other

Renée Pitter, MPH ’09

An effort to spread health positivity among Black Michigan alums became a huge success. In the face of so many stories about health inequities and trauma in Black communities, a growing group of Black alums is moving their way to connection, awareness, health, and healing. Read more

A provider goes over a health resource with a patient or parent

Screening for Social Determinants of Health in Pediatric Settings

Phoebe Trout, Rebeccah Sokol, Julia Ammer, Layla S. Mohammed, Rachel Varisco, Sara F. Stein, and Alison L. Miller

Early screening and intervention, including in the doctor’s office, can help address health inequities and mitigate their impact. The negative effects of childhood adversity extend to a variety of health outcomes. Screening promotes well-being by ensuring families have the resources they need to maintain a healthy environment for their child. Read more